Yusuke Wakabayashi

Yamaguchi University, Yamaguti, Yamaguchi, Japan

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Publications (6)20.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: There is growing evidence that aberrant transcriptional regulation is one of the key components of the pathophysiology of mood disorders. The repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) is a negative regulator of genes that contain the repressor element-1 (RE-1) binding site. REST has many target genes, including corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), brain-derived neurotrophic factor, serotonin 1A receptor, which are suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression and the action of antidepressants. However, a potential role for REST-mediated transcriptional regulation in mood disorders remains unclear. In this study, we examined the mRNA levels of REST and its known and putative target genes, using quantitative real-time PCR in peripheral blood cells of patients with major depressive and bipolar disorders in both a current depressive and a remissive state. We found reduced mRNA expression of REST and increased mRNA expression of CRH, adenylate cyclase 5, and the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, member 12-13 in patients with major depressive disorder in a current depressive state, but not in a remissive state. Altered expression of these mRNAs was not found in patients with bipolar disorder. Our results suggest that the aberrant REST-mediated transcriptional regulation of, at least, CRH, adenylate cyclase 5, and tumor necrosis factor superfamily, member 12-13, might be state-dependent and associated with the pathophysiology of major depression.
    Journal of Psychiatric Research 10/2009; 44(6):378-84. · 4.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent postmortem brain and imaging studies provide evidence for disturbances of structural and synaptic plasticity in patients with mood disorders. Several lines of evidence suggest that the cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), neural cell adhesion molecules (NCAM) and L1, play important roles in both structural and synaptic plasticity. Although postmortem brain studies have indicated altered expression levels of NCAM and L1, it is still unclear whether these changes are state- or trait-dependent. In this study, the mRNA levels for various CAMs, including NCAM and L1, were measured using quantitative real-time PCR in peripheral blood cells of major depressive disorder patients, bipolar disorder patients and normal healthy subjects. Reduced expression levels of NCAM-140 mRNA were observed in bipolar disorder patients in a current depressive state. In contrast, L1 mRNA levels were increased in bipolar disorder patients in a current depressive state. NCAM-140 and L1 mRNA levels were not changed in bipolar disorder patients in a remissive state, or in major depressive disorder patients. In addition, there were no significant changes in the expression levels of intercellular adhesion molecule -1, vascular cell adhesion molecule -1, E-cadherin, or integrin alphaD among healthy controls, major depressive or bipolar disorder patients. Our results suggest that the reciprocal alteration in the expression of NCAM-140 and L1 mRNAs could be state-dependent and associated with the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder.
    Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry 08/2008; 32(5):1199-205. · 3.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Glyoxalase-1 (Glo1) is an antioxidant enzyme which detoxifies alpha-ketoaldehydes to prevent the accumulation of pro-oxidant compounds, such as methylglyoxal, in all cell types. Glo1 has been suggested to be involved in anxiety disorders, autism, and Alzheimer's disease. Mood disorders have a high rate of comorbidity with anxiety disorders although, to date, little is known of the involvement of Glo1 in the pathophysiology of these conditions. In the present study, we examined the expression levels of Glo1 mRNA in peripheral white blood cells of mood disorder patients to understand the role of Glo1 in mood disorders. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction experiments revealed that reduced expression of Glo1 mRNA was observed in major depressive and bipolar disorder patients in a current depressive state, as compared with healthy control subjects. In contrast, the expression of Glo1 mRNA in major depressive and bipolar patients, in a remissive state, showed no significant alteration when compared with healthy control subjects. These results suggest that the aberrant expression of Glo1 might be involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders.
    Neuroscience Letters 07/2008; 438(2):196-9. · 2.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, we established and characterized an animal model of vulnerability to repeated stress. We found that control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats showed a gradual decrease in the HPA axis response following 14 days of repeated restraint stress, whereas Fischer 344 (F344) rats did not show such HPA axis habituation. Similar habituation was observed in the expression of c-fos mRNA, corticotropin-releasing hormone hnRNA, and phospho-CREB and phospho-ERK proteins in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of SD rats, but not in the F344 rats. In addition, repeatedly restrained F344 rats exhibited decreased cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and increased anxiety-related behaviours, while repeatedly restrained SD rats exhibited a selective enhancement of hippocampal cell proliferation in the ventral area. Moreover, we found a lower expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein, but not mRNA, in the PVN of F344 rats compared to SD rats. We also identified that microRNA (miR)-18a inhibited translation of GR mRNA in cultured neuronal cells and that increased expression of miR-18a in the PVN was observed in F344 rats compared with SD rats. These strain differences in GR protein levels were not found in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, and the expression of miR-18a was much lower in these brain regions than in the PVN. Our results suggest that F344 rats could be a useful animal model for studying vulnerability to repeated stress, and that miR-18a-mediated down-regulation of GR translation may be an important factor to be considered in susceptibility to stress-related disorders.
    European Journal of Neuroscience 06/2008; 27(9):2250-61. · 3.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is an abundance of evidence suggesting the involvement of altered levels of expression of neurotrophic factors in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Although postmortem brain studies have indicated the alterations in the expression levels of neurotrophic factors in mood disorder patients, it is unclear whether these changes are state- or trait-dependent. In this study, we examined the expression levels of the members of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family (GDNF, artemin (ARTN), neurturin, and persephin), brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and neurotrophin-4 mRNAs by using quantitative real-time PCR method in peripheral blood cells of patients with major depressive and bipolar disorders in both a current depressive and a remissive states. Reduced expression levels of GDNF, ARTN, and NT-3 mRNAs were found in patients with major depressive disorder in a current depressive state, but not in a remissive state. Altered expressions of these mRNAs were not found in patients with bipolar disorder. Our results suggest that the changes in the expression levels of GDNF, ARTN, and NT-3 mRNAs might be state-dependent and associated with the pathophysiology of major depression.
    Journal of Psychiatric Research 03/2008; 42(14):1145-53. · 4.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Variations and defects in alternative splicing are well known to be associated with a variety of human diseases and the stress response. We previously reported a decrease in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) alpha, but not GRbeta in mood disorder patients, suggesting an aberrant alternative splicing mechanism. To examine whether altered RNA splicing may underlie the pathophysiology of mood disorder, we evaluated the expression of a variety of SR protein splicing factors, a family of proteins indispensable for proper alternative splicing, in mood disorder patients. We used quantitative real-time PCR to measure expressions of SRp20, SRp30c, SC35, SRp40, SRp46, SRp54, SRp55, SRp75, ASF/SF2, and 9G8 mRNA in peripheral white blood cells of 33 mood disorder patients during a depressive episode. In addition, the expressions of SRp20 and SC35 mRNA were quantified for 78 mood disorder patients in a remissive state, and 32 the first-degree relatives of these mood disorder patients. A significant correlation was observed between SRp30c and the GRbeta/GRalpha ratio in control subjects, but not in mood disorder patients. Increased expression of SRp20 but not SRp30c mRNA was observed in bipolar disorder patients in both the depressive and remissive states. Major depressive disorder patients did not show any significant change in mRNA levels of SR proteins. Subjects were Japanese adults. Patient treatment was not standardized. These results suggest that aberrant alternative splicing machinery caused by increased SRp20 mRNA expression would be associated with the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder.
    Journal of Affective Disorders 03/2008; 110(1-2):62-9. · 3.30 Impact Factor