Michel Zummer

Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

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Publications (38)146.22 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objectives Hospitalization is a major factor in health care costs and a surrogate for worse outcomes in chronic disease. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of hospitalization secondary to lupus flare, the causes of hospitalization, and to determine risk factors for hospitalization in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).Methods Data were collected as part of the 1000 Canadian Faces of Lupus, a prospective cohort study, where annual major lupus flares including hospitalizations were recorded over a 3-year period.ResultsOf 665 patients with available hospitalization histories, 68 reported hospitalization related to a SLE flare over 3 years of follow-up. The average annual hospitalization rate was 7.6% (range 6.6-8.9%). The most common reasons for hospitalization were: hematologic (22.1%), serositis (20.6%), musculoskeletal (MSK) (16.2%), and renal (14.7%). Univariate risk factors for lupus hospitalization included (OR [95% CI]; p < 0.05): juvenile-onset lupus (2.2 [1.1-4.7]), number of ACR SLE criteria (1.4 [1.1-1.7], baseline body mass index (BMI) (1.1 [1.0-1.1]), psychosis (3.4 [1.2-9.9]), aboriginal race (3.2 [1.5-6.7]), anti-Smith (2.6 [1.2-5.4]), erythrocyte sedimentation rate >25 mm/hr (1.9 [1.1-3.4]), proteinuria >0.5 g/d (4.2 [1.9-9.3], and SLAM-2 score (1.1 [1.0-1.2]). After multivariate regression only BMI, number of ACR criteria, and psychosis were associated with hospitalization for lupus flare.Conclusions The mean annual rate of hospitalization attributed to lupus was lower than expected. Hematologic, serositis, MSK and renal were the most common reasons. In a regression model elevated BMI, more ACR criteria and psychosis were associated with hospitalization.
    Lupus 09/2013; · 2.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between smoking and cutaneous involvement in SLE. METHODS: We analyzed data from a multicenter Canadian SLE cohort. Muco-cutaneous involvement was recorded at most recent visit, using the SLEDAI-2K (rash, alopecia, oral ulcers), the SLICC/ACR Damage Index (SDI; alopecia, extensive scarring and skin ulceration) and the ACR criteria (malar rash, discoïd rash, photosensitivity, mucosal involvement). Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate independent association between muco-cutaneous involvement and cigarette smoking, age, sex, lupus duration, medications, and laboratory data. RESULTS: In our cohort of 1346 patients, 91.0% were female, with mean age 47.1 years (standard deviation, SD 14.3) and mean disease duration of 13.2 years (SD 10.0). A total of 41.2% reported ever smoking, 14.0% were current smokers and 27.1% were past smokers. Active cutaneous manifestations occurred in 28.4%; cutaneous damage occurred in 15.4%. Regarding ACR criteria, malar rash was noted in 59.5%, discoid rash in 16.9%, and photosensitivity in 55.7%. In multivariate analysis, current smoking was associated with active SLE rash (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.07-2.48). Having ever smoked was associated with the ACR criteria discoid rash (2.36; 1.69-3.29) and photosensitivity (1.47; 1.11-1.95), and with the total cutaneous ACR score (1.50; 1.22-1.85). We did not detect associations between previous smoking and active cutaneous manifestations. No association was found between smoking and cutaneous damage or mucosal ulcers. No interaction was seen between smoking and antimalarials. CONCLUSION: Current smoking is associated with active SLE rash, and ever smoking with cutaneous ACR criteria. This provides additional motivation for smoking cessation in SLE. © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.
    Arthritis care & research. 02/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update estimates of cancer risk in SLE relative to the general population. METHODS: A multisite international SLE cohort was linked with regional tumor registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated as the ratio of observed to expected cancers. RESULTS: Across 30 centres, 16,409 patients were observed for 121,283 (average 7.4) person-years. In total, 644 cancers occurred. Some cancers, notably hematologic malignancies, were substantially increased (SIR 3.02, 95% confidence interval, CI, 2.48, 3.63), particularly non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, NHL (SIR 4.39, 95% CI 3.46, 5.49) and leukemia. In addition, increased risks of cancer of the vulva (SIR 3.78, 95% CI 1.52, 7.78), lung (SIR 1.30, 95% CI 1.04, 1.60), thyroid (SIR 1.76, 95% CI 1.13, 2.61) and possibly liver (SIR 1.87, 95% CI 0.97, 3.27) were suggested. However, a decreased risk was estimated for breast (SIR 0.73, 95% CI 0.61-0.88), endometrial (SIR 0.44, 95% CI 0.23-0.77), and possibly ovarian cancers (0.64, 95% CI 0.34-1.10). The variability of comparative rates across different cancers meant that only a small increased risk was estimated across all cancers (SIR 1.14, 95% CI 1.05, 1.23). CONCLUSION: These data estimate only a small increased risk in SLE (versus the general population) for cancer over-all. However, there is clearly an increased risk of NHL, and cancers of the vulva, lung, thyroid, and possibly liver. It remains unclear to what extent the association with NHL is mediated by innate versus exogenous factors. Similarly, the etiology of the decreased breast, endometrial, and possibly ovarian cancer risk is uncertain, though investigations are ongoing.
    Journal of Autoimmunity 02/2013; · 8.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We aimed to determine disease severity and treatment of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in rheumatology practices in Canada through the PsA Assessment in Rheumatology (PAIR) study. Rheumatologists who were members of the Canadian Rheumatology Association were asked to complete a form for each patient addressing demographic questions, history, clinical examination, and patient-reported outcomes. Results were compared with a cohort seen in a PsA clinic during the same period. From across Canada, 22 rheumatologists from 5 provinces submitted information about 233 consecutive patients with PsA [145 men (62.2%), 88 women (37.8%), mean age 53.2 yrs (±12.7), 88.4% disease duration>2 yrs]. A majority (80.7%) fulfilled ClASsification for Psoriatic ARthritis (CASPAR) criteria, and 30% had taken no disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Clinical joint damage was documented in 60% of the patients, active skin disease in 70%, and nail lesions in 32%. Only 22% were rated as having moderate to high disease activity, while 52% were rated as low disease activity and 26% were deemed in remission. The decision was based on joint counts, patient global assessment, physician global assessment, and acute-phase reactants. Twenty-seven percent of the patients were to have their medications changed based on the current visit, the majority for inadequate response to medications. Patients in the PAIR cohort had more inflamed joints but similar damage to those in the PsA clinic. Patients with PsA seen in regular rheumatology practice fulfill CASPAR criteria, have active disease, and more than half have joint damage. The majority have low activity or are in remission.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 08/2012; 39(9):1850-3. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) has developed recommendations for the pharmacological management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with traditional and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) in 2 parts. Part II, focusing on specific safety aspects of treatment with traditional and biologic DMARD in patients with RA, is reported here. Key questions were identified a priori based on results of a national needs-assessment survey. A systematic review of all clinical practice guidelines and consensus statements regarding treatment with traditional and biologic DMARD in patients with RA published between January 2000 and June 2010 was performed in Medline, Embase, and CINAHL databases, and was supplemented with a "grey literature" search including relevant public health guidelines. Systematic reviews of postmarketing surveillance and RA registry studies were performed to update included guideline literature reviews as appropriate. Guideline quality was independently assessed by 2 reviewers. Guideline characteristics, recommendations, and supporting evidence from observational studies and randomized trials were synthesized into evidence tables. The working group voted on recommendations using a modified Delphi technique. Thirteen recommendations addressing perioperative care, screening for latent tuberculosis infection prior to the initiation of biologic DMARD, optimal vaccination practices, and treatment of RA patients with active or a history of malignancy were developed for rheumatologists, other primary prescribers of RA drug therapies, and RA patients. These recommendations were developed based on a synthesis of international RA and public health guidelines, supporting evidence, and expert consensus in the context of the Canadian health system. They are intended to help promote best practices and improve healthcare delivery for persons with RA.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 06/2012; 39(8):1583-602. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The (ever) prevalence of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) can vary widely depending on the definition used. We determined the prevalence of NPSLE in 1000 Faces of Lupus, a large multicenter Canadian cohort. Adults enrolled at 10 sites who satisfied the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were included. NPSLE was defined as (i) NPSLE by ACR classification criteria (seizures or psychosis), (ii) ACR, SLEDAI (seizure, psychosis, organic brain syndrome, cranial nerve disorder, headache, and cerebrovascular accident (CVA)), SLAM (CVA, seizure, cortical dysfunction, and headache), and SLICC (cognitive impairment, psychosis, seizures, CVA, cranial or peripheral neuropathy, and transverse myelitis) with and (iii) without minor nonspecific NPSLE manifestations (including mild depression, mild cognitive impairment, and electromyogram-negative neuropathies), and (iv) by ACR and SLEDAI neuropsychiatric (NP) indexes alone. Factors associated with NPSLE were explored using regression models. Cohort size was 1253, with mean disease 12 ± 10 years, mean age 41 ± 16 years, and 86% female. Subgroup size was dependent on the specific definition of NPSLE. Prevalence of NPSLE was 6.4% in group (i), n = 1253 (n = 80); 38.6% in group (ii), n = 681(n = 263); 28.7% in group (iii), n = 586 (n = 168); and 10.2% in group (iv), n = 1125 (n = 115). In univariate analysis, Aboriginals had a nearly 2-fold increase in frequency of NPSLE in all groups. Education level and income were not associated with NPSLE (P = 0.32 and 0.03, respectively). As well, number of ACR criteria, SLAM, age at diagnosis, disease duration, and gender were not associated with NPSLE. Anti-Ro was significantly associated in groups (i) and (iv) and antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) were increased in groups (i), (ii), and (iii); however, this lost significance when thromboembolic events were excluded from SLICC, SLEDAI, and SLAM indexes. In group (iv), absence of anti-Sm was significant. In multivariate analysis, anti-Ro and aPL (i) and anti-Ro+ and lack of anti-Sm (iv) were significant. NPSLE was not increased in those with +anti-DNA, La, or ribonucleoprotein (RNP), lupus anticoagulant (LAC), or anticardiolipin (aCL) antibody. The prevalence and factors associated with NPSLE varied depending on the definition used, was highest in Aboriginals, and may be higher if +anti-Ro or aPL are present. SLAM and SLICC include mild subjective disease manifestations, which contributed to a 10% higher prevalence of NPSLE compared to a more strict definition. NPSLE may be less in this database than other publications as its overall prevalence may be decreasing, or because of selection bias inherent to those who enter an observational cohort. NPSLE was associated with aPL and often anti-Ro and varied by ethnicity.
    Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism 05/2012; 42(2):179-85. · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) has developed recommendations for the pharmacological management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with traditional and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) in 2 parts. Part 1 is reported here. The CRA Therapeutics Committee assembled a national working group of RA clinical experts, researchers, patient consumers, and a general practitioner. Treatment questions were developed a priori based on results of a national needs assessment survey. A systematic review of all clinical practice guidelines and consensus statements regarding treatment with traditional and biologic DMARD in patients with RA published between January 2000 and June 2010 was performed in Medline, Embase, and CINAHL databases, and the grey literature. Guideline quality was assessed by 2 independent reviewers, and guideline characteristics, recommendations, and supporting evidence from observational studies and randomized controlled trials were synthesized into evidence tables. The full working group reviewed the evidence tables and developed recommendations using a modified Delphi technique. Five overarching principles and 26 recommendations addressing general RA management strategies and treatment with glucocorticoids and traditional and biologic DMARD were developed for rheumatologists, other primary prescribers of RA drug therapies, and patients with RA. These recommendations were developed based on a synthesis of international guidelines, supporting evidence, and expert consensus considering the Canadian healthcare context with the intention of promoting best practices and improving healthcare delivery for persons with RA.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 09/2011; 39(8):1559-82. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Current clinical trial designs for pharmacologic interventions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) do not reflect the innovations in RA diagnosis, treatment, and care in countries where new drugs are most often used. The objective of this project was to recommend revised entry criteria and other study design features for RA clinical trials. Recommendations were developed using a modified nominal group consensus method. Canadian Rheumatology Research Consortium (CRRC) members were polled to rank the greatest challenges to clinical trial recruitment in their practices. Initial recommendations were developed by an expert panel of rheumatology trialists and other experts. A scoping study methodology was then used to examine the evidence available to support or refute each initial recommendation. The potential influence of CRRC recommendations on primary outcomes in future trials was examined. Recommendations were finalized using a consensus process. Recommendations for clinical trial inclusion criteria addressed measures of disease activity [Disease Activity Score 28 using erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) > 3.2 PLUS ≥ 3 tender joints using 28-joint count (TJC28) PLUS ≥ 3 swollen joint (SJC28) OR C-reactive protein (CRP) or ESR > upper limit of normal PLUS ≥ 3 TJC28 PLUS ≥ 3 SJC28], functional classification, disease classification and duration, and concomitant RA treatments. Additional recommendations regarding study design addressed rescue strategies and longterm extension. There is an urgent need to modify clinical trial inclusion criteria and other study design features to better reflect the current characteristics of people living with RA in the countries where the new drugs will be used.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 07/2011; 38(10):2095-104. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Cananda (SPARCC) is a transdiscliplinary research network of investigators interested in spondyloarthritis. The group has been supported by a new research initiative by The Arthritis Society. SPARCC aims to address the genetic basis of susceptibility of the disease and develop and validate clinical and imaging outcomes to assess disease activity and structural damage over time, the response to therapy, and the clinical burden of illness in terms of quality of life and disability. The first step was to develop a database that would allow ascertainment of phenotype for genetic studies, as well as accurate and detailed longitudinal information for disease expression and outcome studies. This article describes the SPARCC database and outlines difficulties and possible solutions for maintaining such a database.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 04/2011; 38(7):1343-8. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study are to characterize fatigue in patients with spondyloarthropathy (SpA) using a multidimensional assessment and to delineate contributors to dimensions of fatigue. Fatigue in 125 participants with SpA was assessed using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20). Participants completed standardized questionnaires assessing sleep quality, depressed mood, perceived stress, social support, leisure time physical activity, functional capacity, and disease activity. Hierarchical multiple regressions were computed to identify contributors to physical and mental fatigue. Patients scored high on all five MFI-20 fatigue dimensions, with general fatigue and physical fatigue having the highest scores. A hierarchical multiple regression showed that worse functional capacity, greater perceived stress, more depressed mood and less participation in leisure time physical activity contributed to higher physical fatigue scores. The results of the second model found depressed mood to be the strongest determinant of mental fatigue, followed by poorer sleep quality and younger age. These findings indicate that fatigue in SpA is a multidimensional experience, with physical and mental aspects likely having different etiologies. A number of variables potentially amenable to treatment were found to be associated with physical and mental fatigue. A multidimensional assessment of fatigue in SpA is needed to tailor and optimize interventions aimed at alleviating fatigue.
    Rheumatology International 04/2011; 31(4):473-80. · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate factors affecting therapeutic approaches used in clinical practice for the management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), in a multicenter cohort. We combined data from 10 clinical adult SLE cohort registries in Canada. We used multivariate generalized estimating equation methods to model dichotomized outcomes, running separate regressions where the outcome was current exposure of the patient to specific medications. Potential predictors of medication use included demographic (baseline age, sex, residence, race/ethnicity) and clinical factors (disease duration, time-dependent damage index scores, and adjusted mean SLE Disease Activity Index-2K scores). The models also adjusted for clustering by center. Higher disease activity and damage scores were each independent predictors of exposure to nonsteroid immunosuppressive agents, and for exposure to prednisone. This was not definitely demonstrated for antimalarial agents. Older age at diagnosis was independently and inversely associated with exposure to any of the agents studied (immunosuppressive agents, prednisone, and antimalarial agents). An additional independent predictor of prednisone exposure was black race/ethnicity (adjusted RR 1.46, 95% CI 1.18, 1.81). For immunosuppressive exposure, an additional independent predictor was race/ethnicity, with greater exposure among Asians (RR 1.39, 95% CI 1.02, 1.89) and persons identifying themselves as First Nations/Inuit (2.09, 95% CI 1.43, 3.04) than among whites. All of these findings were reproduced when adjustment for disease activity was limited to renal involvement. Ours is the first portrayal of determinants of clinical practice patterns in SLE, and offers interesting real-world insights. Further work, including efforts to determine how differing clinical approaches may influence outcome, is in progress.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 11/2010; 38(2):271-4. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease. Multiple genetic and environmental factors contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. Recent genome-wide association studies have added substantially to the number of genes associated with SLE. To replicate some of these susceptibility loci, single-nucleotide polymorphisms reported to be associated to SLE were evaluated in a cohort of 245 well-phenotyped Canadian SLE trios. Our results replicate previously reported associations to alleles of interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), major histocompatibility complex (MHC), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4), Kell blood group complex subunit-related family member 6 (XKR6), B-cell scaffold protein with ankyrin repeats 1 (BANK1), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22), ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2L 3 (UBE2L3) and islet cell autoantigen 1 (ICA1). We also identify putative associations to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4), a gene associated with several autoimmune disorders, and ERBB3, a locus on 12q13 that was previously reported to be associated with type 1 diabetes. This study confirms the existence of multiple genetic risk factors for SLE, and supports the notion that some risk factors for SLE are shared with other inflammatory disorders.
    Genes and immunity 10/2010; 12(1):51-8. · 4.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our study sought to identify barriers to optimal care for individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our study was set in a population with universal access to comprehensive health care in the context of a university hospital health network. Using purposive sampling, we invited RA patients, health professionals, and decision makers from urban and rural regions to participate in structured focus group interviews. Content analysis was performed to determine themes emerging from the data. We identified four general themes. First, initial barriers to optimal care for people begin before primary care contact, at the level of the general population and/or related to primary care access. Second, many factors (at the patient, physician, and system level) influenced how quickly a patient is referred from primary to specialty care. Third, after referral, multiple comanagement issues influence patient outcomes. Fourth, optimizing RA care requires adequate resources. Participants emphasized the need for more education (of patients, of health care providers, and within the general community), better communication between and among patients and health care providers, and more efficient use of existing resources. Our work provides insights regarding barriers to and facilitators of optimal care in RA. Further work with these stakeholder groups in our health care region will examine potential solutions and the feasibility of their implementation. Our work provides an example of how research can assist stakeholder leaders in creating structured and incremental plans to improve health care delivery for persons with chronic diseases like RA.
    Clinical Rheumatology 06/2010; 29(6):645-57. · 2.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pleuritis is a common manifestation and independent predictor of mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We examined the prevalence of pleuritis and factors associated with pleuritis in a multicenter Canadian SLE cohort. We studied consecutive adults satisfying the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria for SLE who had a completed Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/ACR Damage Index (SDI) score, at least 1 evaluable extractable nuclear antigen assay, and either a SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) or a SLE Activity Measure score. Pleuritis was defined as having pleuritis by satisfying the ACR criteria or the SLEDAI. Factors related to pleuritis were examined using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. In our cohort of 876 patients, 91% were women, 65% Caucasian, mean age (+/- SD) was 46.8 +/- 13.5 years, and disease duration at study entry was 12.1 +/- 9.9 years; the prevalence of pleuritis was 34% (n = 296). Notably, greater disease duration (p = 0.002), higher SDI score (p <or= 0.0001), age at SLE diagnosis (p = 0.009), and anti-Sm (p = 0.002) and anti-RNP (p = 0.002) seropositivity were significantly associated with pleuritis. In multivariate analysis with adjustment for disease duration, age at diagnosis, and SDI score, concomitant seropositivity for RNP and Sm were related to a nearly 2-fold greater prevalence of pleuritis (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.31-2.82). Pleuritis occurred in one-third of this Canadian cohort. Concomitant Sm and RNP seropositivity, greater cumulative damage, longer disease duration, and younger age at SLE disease onset were related to a higher rate of SLE pleural disease.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 04/2010; 37(4):747-53. · 3.26 Impact Factor
  • The Journal of Rheumatology 05/2009; 36(4):852-3; author reply 853-4. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe disease expression and damage accrual in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and determine the influence of ethnicity and socioeconomic factors on damage accrual in a large multiethnic Canadian cohort. Adults with SLE were enrolled in a multicenter cohort. Data on sociodemographic factors, diagnostic criteria, disease activity, autoantibodies, treatment, and damage were collected using standardized tools, and results were compared across ethnic groups. We analyzed baseline data, testing for differences in sociodemographic and clinical factors, between the different ethnic groups, in univariate analyses; significant variables from univariate analyses were included in multivariate regression models examining for differences between ethnic groups, related to damage scores. We studied 1416 patients, including 826 Caucasians, 249 Asians, 122 Afro-Caribbeans, and 73 Aboriginals. Although the overall number of American College of Rheumatology criteria in different ethnic groups was similar, there were differences in individual manifestations and autoantibody profiles. Asian and Afro-Caribbean patients had more frequent renal involvement and more exposure to immunosuppressives. Aboriginal patients had high frequencies of antiphospholipid antibodies and high rates of comorbidity, but disease manifestations similar to Caucasians. Asian patients had the youngest age at onset and the lowest damage scores. Aboriginals had the least education and lowest incomes. The final regression model (R2=0.27) for higher damage score included older age, longer disease duration, low income, prednisone treatment, higher disease activity, and cyclophosphamide treatment. There are differences in lupus phenotypes between ethnic populations. Although ethnicity was not found to be a significant independent predictor of damage accrual, low income was.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 05/2009; 36(6):1200-8. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To characterize sleep complaints and identify biopsychosocial factors associated with sleep problems in patients with spondyloarthropathy (SpA). The sample comprised 125 patients with SpA. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Participants completed standardized questionnaires assessing depressed mood, perceived stress, leisure time physical activity, functional disability and disease activity. A series of hierarchical multiple regressions were computed to examine the determinants of the following sleep parameters: quality, latency, duration and efficiency. The mean global PSQI score was 8.7 (SD = 5.0), with 69% of the sample classified as poor sleepers (PSQI global score >5). Worse functional status was associated with poorer sleep quality (p = 0.006), longer sleep latency (p = 0.004), shorter sleep duration (p = 0.001) and poorer sleep efficiency (p = 0.004). Higher depressed mood scores emerged in the multivariate analyses as a significant determinant of poorer sleep quality (p = 0.010), shorter sleep duration (p = 0.007) and poorer sleep efficiency (p = 0.006). Higher perceived stress was an independent contributor of poorer sleep quality (p = 0.033). The relationships between worse functional status and poorer sleep quality and shorter sleep duration were more pronounced for participants who completed the questionnaires in the English language. Sleep problems are prevalent among patients with SpA. Our findings suggest that multiple factors are associated with sleep complaints in persons with SpA with functional status, depressed mood and stress differentially contributing to specific sleep parameters. Multimodal interventions, which include non-pharmacological methods targeting these biopsychosocial factors, require evaluation to optimize the management of sleep disruptions in SpA.
    Musculoskeletal Care 05/2009; 7(3):143-61.
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    ABSTRACT: To adapt the self-administered comorbidity questionnaire (SCQ) into the Early Inflammatory Arthritis-SCQ (EIA-SCQ) and assess its clinimetric properties in EIA. The EIA-SCQ and indices of disease activity, function, pain, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and health resource utilization were administered to 320 patients with EIA. Twenty patients completed the EIA-SCQ a second time 1 week later. Construct validity was evaluated by testing the hypotheses that a valid comorbidity index would correlate well with age, weakly with HRQoL and recent resource utilization and poorly with indices of disease activity, function and pain. The intra-class correlation coefficient between repeat scores was 0.93 (95% CI 0.83-0.97). Kappa values for individual items ranged from 0.64 to 1.0. EIA-SCQ scores correlated moderately with age (Tau B = 0.29, P < 0.001) and weakly with function (HAQ-DI Tau B = 0.09, P = 0.03), pain (McGill Pain Questionnaire Tau B = 0.09, P = 0.05), some measures of HRQoL [the SF-36 mental component score (MCS) Tau B = - 0.08, P < 0.05; World Health Organization Disease Assessment Schedule II score Tau B = 0.09, P = 0.03] and a measure of resource utilization (number of tests in the last 4 months Tau B = 0.10, P = 0.04). The EIA-SCQ did not correlate with other measures of disease activity, another HRQoL measure [SF-36 physical component score (PCS)] or other measures of resource utilization. The EIA-SCQ is reliable and valid for use in EIA. It has the potential to become a useful measure of comorbidity in outcome studies of EIA when the resources for a full medical chart review are unavailable.
    Rheumatology (Oxford, England) 02/2009; 48(4):390-4. · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the longitudinal relationships, including directionality, among chronic pain, symptoms of depression, and disease activity in patients with early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). One hundred eighty patients with EIA completed an examination, including swollen joint count, and were administered the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) at 2 timepoints 6 months apart. Cross-lagged panel path analysis was used to simultaneously assess concurrent and longitudinal relationships among pain, symptoms of depression, and number of swollen joints. Pain, symptoms of depression, and number of swollen joints decreased over time (p < 0.001) and were prospectively linked to pain, symptoms of depression, and number of swollen joints, respectively, at 6 months. Symptoms of depression and pain were correlated with each other at baseline (0.47) and at 6-month followup assessments (0.28). Baseline symptoms of depression significantly predicted pain symptoms at 6 months (standardized regression coefficient = 0.28, p = 0.001), whereas pain and disease activity did not predict the course of any other variable after controlling for baseline values. Symptoms of depression predicted the trajectory of pain from baseline to 6 months. In addition, there were reciprocal/bidirectional associations between pain and symptoms of depression over time. More research is needed to better understand the relationship between pain and depressive symptoms and how to best manage patients with EIA who have high levels of both.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 01/2009; 36(2):231-9. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the potential benefits of methotrexate in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A 12-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of methotrexate with folic acid was conducted. Intent-to-treat analyses were performed with mixed linear models and alpha = 0.04 (96% confidence interval [96% CI]) to account for interim analysis of longitudinal data to assess the treatment effects on lupus disease activity and daily steroid dose across monthly measurements, and to test if the treatment effects depended on selected participant characteristics. Of 215 participants screened, 94 were excluded, 35 declined, and 86 were randomized (methotrexate = 41, placebo = 45). The groups were balanced for demographic and disease characteristics. Antimalarial use was more frequent in the placebo group, which was adjusted for in multivariable analyses. Sixty participants (27 methotrexate, 33 placebo) completed the study and 26 terminated early. Among participants who had the same baseline prednisone dose, those taking methotrexate received, on average, 1.33 mg/day less prednisone during the trial period (96% CI 0.06, 2.72 mg/day; a 22% reduction of their average-during-trial daily dose) compared with those in the placebo group. For the primary measure of disease activity (revised Systemic Lupus Activity Measure), methotrexate use was also associated with a marginally significant reduction in the mean during-trial score of 0.86 units (96% CI 0.01, 1.71; P = 0.039). A significant interaction between treatment and baseline damage was found (P = 0.001). Methotrexate conferred a significant advantage in participants with moderately active lupus by lowering daily prednisone dose and slightly decreasing lupus disease activity. As a therapeutic option in moderate SLE, methotrexate can be considered to be steroid sparing.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 12/2008; 59(12):1796-804. · 7.48 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

754 Citations
146.22 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2013
    • Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
    • Toronto Western Hospital
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • The Arthritis Society
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2000–2013
    • McGill University
      • • Division of Rheumatology
      • • Department of Medicine
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2012
    • University of Toronto
      • Centre For Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2008–2010
    • McGill University Health Centre
      • Epidemiology Clinic
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada