Borís Burle

Aix-Marseille Université, Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France

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Publications (91)270.5 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Understanding how the brain processes errors is an essential and active field of neuroscience. Real time extraction and analysis of error signals provides an innovative method of assessing how individuals perceive ongoing interactions without recourse to overt behaviour. This area of research is critical in modern Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) design, but may also open fruitful perspectives in cognitive neuroscience research. In this context, we sought to determine whether we can extract discriminatory error-related activity in the source space, online, and on a trial by trial basis from electroencephalography data recorded during motor imagery. Using a data driven approach, based on interpretable inverse solution algorithms, we assessed the extent to which automatically extracted error-related activity was physiologically and functionally interpretable according to performance monitoring literature. The applicability of inverse solution based methods for automatically extracting error signals, in the presence of noise generated by motor imagery, were validated by simulation. Representative regions of interest, outlining the primary generators contributing to classification, were found to correspond closely to networks involved in error detection and performance monitoring. We observed discriminative activity in non-frontal areas, demonstrating that areas outside of the medial frontal cortex can contribute to the classification of error feedback activity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    NeuroImage 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.06.041 · 6.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We focus on the descriptive approach to linear discriminant analysis for matrix-variate data in the binary case. Under a separability assumption on row and column variability, the most discriminant linear combinations of rows and columns are determined by the singular value decomposition of the difference of the class-averages with the Mahalanobis metric in the row and column spaces. This approach provides data representations of data in two-dimensional or three-dimensional plots and singles out discriminant components. An application to electroencephalographic multi-sensor signals illustrates the relevance of the method.
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    ABSTRACT: A deficit in "interference control" is commonly found in adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). This has mainly been interpreted as difficulties in inhibiting inappropriate responses. However, interference control involves processes other than simply the ability to inhibit. Consequently, we used sophisticated analysis to decipher the additional processes of interference control in these patients. We compared interference control between 16 adults with ADHD and 15 control adults performing a Simon task. In most studies, performance is generally reported in terms of mean error rates and reaction times (RTs). However, here we used distribution analyses of behavioral data, complemented by analyses of electromyographic (EMG) activity. This allowed us to better quantify the control of interference, specifically the part that remains hidden when pure correct trials are not distinguished from partial errors. Partial errors correspond to sub-threshold EMG bursts induced by incorrect responses that immediately precede a correct response. Moreover, besides "online" control, we also investigated cognitive control effects manifesting across consecutive trials. The main findings were that adults with ADHD were slower and showed a larger interference effect in comparison to controls. However, the data revealed that the larger interference effect was due neither to higher impulse expression, nor to a deficit in inhibition but that these patients presented a larger interference effect than the controls after congruent trials. We propose and discuss the hypothesis that the interference control deficit found in adults with ADHD is secondary to impairments in sustained attention. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    Acta psychologica 06/2015; 159:85-92. DOI:10.1016/j.actpsy.2015.05.010 · 2.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The main goal of this work is to develop a model for multisensor signals, such as magnetoencephalography or electroencephalography (EEG) signals that account for inter-trial variability, suitable for corresponding binary classification problems. An important constraint is that the model be simple enough to handle small size and unbalanced datasets, as often encountered in BCI-type experiments. The method involves the linear mixed effects statistical model, wavelet transform, and spatial filtering, and aims at the characterization of localized discriminant features in multisensor signals. After discrete wavelet transform and spatial filtering, a projection onto the relevant wavelet and spatial channels subspaces is used for dimension reduction. The projected signals are then decomposed as the sum of a signal of interest (i.e., discriminant) and background noise, using a very simple Gaussian linear mixed model. Thanks to the simplicity of the model, the corresponding parameter estimation problem is simplified. Robust estimates of class-covariance matrices are obtained from small sample sizes and an effective Bayes plug-in classifier is derived. The approach is applied to the detection of error potentials in multichannel EEG data in a very unbalanced situation (detection of rare events). Classification results prove the relevance of the proposed approach in such a context. The combination of the linear mixed model, wavelet transform and spatial filtering for EEG classification is, to the best of our knowledge, an original approach, which is proven to be effective. This paper improves upon earlier results on similar problems, and the three main ingredients all play an important role.
    Journal of Neural Engineering 05/2015; 12(3):036013. DOI:10.1088/1741-2560/12/3/036013 · 3.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Among the different brain imaging techniques, electroencephalography (EEG) is classically considered as having an excellent temporal resolution, but a poor spatial one. Here, we argue that the actual temporal resolution of conventional (scalp potentials) EEG is overestimated, and that volume conduction, the main cause of the poor spatial resolution of EEG, also distorts the recovered time course of the underlying sources at scalp level, and hence degrades the actual temporal resolution of EEG. While Current Source Density (CSD) estimates, through the Surface Laplacian (SL) computation, is well known to dramatically reduce volume conduction effects and hence improve EEG spatial resolution, its positive impact on EEG temporal resolution is much less recognized. In two simulation studies, we first show how volume conduction and reference electrodes distort the scalp potential time course, and how SL transform provides a much better spatio-temporal description. We then exemplify similar effects on two empirical datasets. We show how the time courses of the scalp potentials mis-estimate the latencies of the relevant brain events and that CSD provides a much richer, and much more accurate, view of the spatio-temporal dynamics of brain activity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 05/2015; 8. DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.05.004 · 2.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Electroencephalography (EEG) is a very popular technique for investigating brain functions and/or mental processes. To this aim, EEG activities must be interpreted in terms of brain and/or mental processes. EEG signals being a direct manifestation of neuronal activity it is often assumed that such interpretations are quite obvious or, at least, straightforward. However, they often rely on (explicit or even implicit) assumptions regarding the structures supposed to generate the EEG activities of interest. For these assumptions to be used appropriately, reliable links between EEG activities and the underlying brain structures must be established. Because of volume conduction effects and the mixture of activities they induce, these links are difficult to establish with scalp potential recordings. We present different examples showing how the Laplacian transformation, acting as an efficient source separation method, allowed to establish more reliable links between EEG activities and brain generators and, ultimately, with mental operations. The nature of those links depends on the depth of inferences that can vary from weak to strong. Along this continuum, we show that 1) while the effects of experimental manipulation can appear widely distributed with scalp potentials, Laplacian transformation allows to reveal several generators contributing (in different manners) to these modulations, 2) amplitude variations within the same set of generators can generate spurious differences in scalp potential topographies, often interpreted as reflecting different source configurations. In such a case, Laplacian transformation provides much more similar topographies, evidencing the same generator(s) set, 3) using the LRP as an index of response activation most often produces ambiguous results, Laplacian-transformed response-locked ERPs obtained over motor areas allow resolving these ambiguities. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.04.022 · 2.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Analyzing RT distributions in the Simon task reveals that congruency effects decrease for the longest RTs. Four experiments were carried out to examine whether this decrease of the congruency effect with response speed was under a top-down control or due to bottom-up mechanisms. We specifically manipulated the availability of attentional resources by requiring participants to perform a Simon task concurrently to different secondary tasks. RT distribution analysis (in particular delta functions) was performed under both single-task and dual-task conditions. Results show that the reduction of the interference effect with time could be affected when the Simon task was performed concurrently with a secondary task. Nonetheless, the type of the secondary task seems to be a critical factor. Therefore, the data suggest that the mechanisms responsible for the reduction of the interference effect with time are under some attentional control but the exact nature of these mechanisms remains to be explored.
    Experimental Psychology 03/2015; 62(2):75-88. DOI:10.1027/1618-3169/a000275 · 2.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To err is human. However, an inappropriate urge does not always result in error. Impulsive errors thus entail both a motor system capture by an urge to act and a failed inhibition of that impulse. Here we show that neuromodulatory electrical stimulation of the supplementary motor complex in healthy humans leaves action urges unchanged but prevents them from turning into overt errors. Subjects performed a choice reaction-time task known to trigger impulsive responses, leading to fast errors that can be revealed by analyzing accuracy as a function of poststimulus time. Yet, such fast errors are only the tip of the iceberg: electromyography (EMG) revealed fast subthreshold muscle activation in the incorrect response hand in an even larger proportion of overtly correct trials, revealing covert response impulses not discernible in overt behavior. Analyzing both overt and covert response tendencies enables to gauge the ability to prevent these incorrect impulses from turning into overt action errors. Hyperpolarizing the supplementary motor complex using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) preserves action impulses but prevents their behavioral expression. This new combination of detailed behavioral, EMG, and tDCS techniques clarifies the neurophysiology of impulse control, and may point to avenues for improving impulse control deficits in various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/333010-06$15.00/0.
    The Journal of Neuroscience : The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience 02/2015; 35(7):3010-5. DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1642-14.2015 · 6.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In a previous article, (RiSs, Legou, Burle, Alario, & Malfait, 2012), we reported that articulatory processes contribute to the well-established finding that response latencies are longer for picture naming than for word reading. We based this conclusion on the observation that picture naming, as compared with word reading, lengthened not only the interval between stimulus onset and the initiation of lip muscle activation (premotor time), but also the interval between lip muscle activation and vocal response onset (motor time). However, on the basis of our subsequent work in this area, we believe that our original definition of premotor time (and, consequently, of motor time) was suboptimal. On a sizable number of trials, this led to the detection of lip muscle activation (as inferred from surface EMG) that was apparently unrelated to the articulation of the vocal response. Therefore, we believe it is preferable to operationalize premotor time as the interval between stimulus onset and the muscle activation that occurred closest in time to vocal response onset. After reestimating premotor times according to this new definition, we no longer found an effect of our task contrast on the motor time interval. The present article explains the caveats regarding our previous analysis.
    Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 02/2015; 22(1):309-311. DOI:10.3758/s13423-014-0668-4 · 2.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Impulsive actions entail (1) capture of the motor system by an action impulse, which is an urge to act and (2) failed suppression of that impulse in order to prevent a response error. Several studies indicate that dopaminergic treatment can induce action impulsivity in patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD). Whether this effect is due to increased impulse expression or to decreased impulse suppression remains to be deciphered. We used a novel approach based on electromyographic (EMG) analyses to decipher the effects of the patient's usual dopaminergic therapy on the expression and suppression of subliminal erroneous impulses. To this end, we used a within-subject design and took advantage of the Simon task, that elicits prepotent response tendencies. The patients (N = 15) performed the task on their usual dopaminergic medication and after complete medication withdrawal (for at least 12 h). The correction rate that measures the ability to suppress subthreshold impulsive muscle activity was lower when the patients were on medication as compared to their off medication state (p < 0.05). The incorrect activation rate that measures the capture of the motor system by action impulses was unaffected by medication. Dopa therapy affected action impulsivity. Although medication did not influence the incidence of fast action impulses, it significantly reduced patients' ability to abort and suppress muscle activation related to the incorrect response alternative.
    Psychopharmacology 12/2014; DOI:10.1007/s00213-014-3805-x · 3.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the mental architecture between stimulus and response, cognitive models often divide the stimulus-response (SR) interval into stages or modules. Predictions derived from such models are typically tested by focusing on the moment of response emission, through the analysis of response time (RT) distributions. To go beyond the single response event, we recently proposed a method to fractionate verbal RTs into two physiologically defined intervals that are assumed to reflect different processing stages. The analysis of the durations of these intervals can be used to study the interaction between cognitive and motor processing during speech production. Our method is inspired by studies on decision making that used manual responses, in which RTs were fractionated into a premotor time (PMT), assumed to reflect cognitive processing, and a motor time (MT), assumed to reflect motor processing. In these studies, surface EMG activity was recorded from participants' response fingers. EMG onsets, reflecting the initiation of a motor response, were used as the point of fractionation. We adapted this method to speech-production research by measuring verbal responses in combination with EMG activity from facial muscles involved in articulation. However, in contrast to button-press tasks, the complex task of producing speech often resulted in multiple EMG bursts within the SR interval. This observation forced us to decide how to operationalize the point of fractionation: as the first EMG burst after stimulus onset (the stimulus-locked approach), or as the EMG burst that is coupled to the vocal response (the response-locked approach). The point of fractionation has direct consequences on how much of the overall task effect is captured by either interval. Therefore, the purpose of the current paper was to compare both onset-detection procedures in order to make an informed decision about which of the two is preferable. We concluded in favor or the response-locked approach.
    Frontiers in Psychology 10/2014; DOI:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01213 · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: When an on-board system detects a drift of a vehicle to the left or to the right, in what way should the information be delivered to the driver? Car manufacturers have so far neglected relevant results from Experimental Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience. Here we show that this situation possibly led to the sub-optimal design of a lane departure warning system (AFIL, PSA Peugeot Citroën) implemented in commercially available automobile vehicles. Twenty participants performed a two-choice reaction time task in which they were to respond by clockwise or counter-clockwise wheel-rotations to tactile stimulations of their left or right wrist. They performed poorer when responding counter-clockwise to the right vibration and clockwise to the left vibration (incompatible mapping) than when responding according to the reverse (compatible) mapping. This suggests that AFIL implements the worse (incompatible) mapping for the operators. This effect depended on initial practice with the interface. The present research illustrates how basic approaches in Cognitive Science may benefit to Human Factors Engineering and ultimately improve man-machine interfaces and show how initial learning can affect interference effects.
    Frontiers in Psychology 10/2014; 5:1045. DOI:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01045 · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper proposes a new method for constructing and selecting of discriminant space-time-scale features for electroencephalogram (EEG) signal classification, suitable for Error Related Potentials (ErrP)detection in brain-computer interface (BCI). The method rests on a new variant of matrix-variate Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), and differs from previously proposed approaches in mainly three ways. First, a discrete wavelet expansion is introduced for mapping time-courses to time-scale coefficients, yielding time-scale localized features. Second, the matrix-variate LDA is modified in such a way that it yields an interesting duality property, that makes interpretation easier. Third, a space penalization is introduced using a surface Laplacian, so as to enforce spatial smoothness. The pro-posed approaches, termed D-MLDA and D-MPDA are tested on EEG signals, with the goal of detecting ErrP. Numerical results show that D-MPDA outperforms D-MLDA and other matrix-variate LDA techniques. In addition this method produces relevant features for interpretation in ErrP signals.
    ICASSP; 05/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Formal models of decision-making have traditionally focused on simple, two-choice perceptual decisions. To date, one of the most influential account of this process is Ratcliff's drift diffusion model (DDM). However, the extension of the model to more complex decisions is not straightforward. In particular, conflicting situations, such as the Eriksen, Stroop, or Simon tasks, require control mechanisms that shield the cognitive system against distracting information. We adopted a novel strategy to constrain response time (RT) models by concurrently investigating two well-known empirical laws in conflict tasks, both at experimental and modeling levels. The two laws, predicted by the DDM, describe the relationship between mean RT and (i) target intensity (Piéron's law), (ii) standard deviation of RT (Wagenmakers-Brown's law). Pioneering work has shown that Piéron's law holds in the Stroop task, and has highlighted an additive relationship between target intensity and compatibility. We found similar results in both Eriksen and Simon tasks. Compatibility also violated Wagenmakers-Brown's law in a very similar and particular fashion in the two tasks, suggesting a common model framework. To investigate the nature of this commonality, predictions of two recent extensions of the DDM that incorporate selective attention mechanisms were simulated and compared to the experimental results. Both models predict Piéron's law and the violation of Wagenmakers-Brown's law by compatibility. Fits of the models to the RT distributions and accuracy data allowed us to further reveal their relative strengths and deficiencies. Combining experimental and computational results, this study sets the groundwork for a unified model of decision-making in conflicting environments.
    Cognitive Psychology 04/2014; 72C:162-195. DOI:10.1016/j.cogpsych.2014.03.002 · 3.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The capacity to evaluate the outcomes of our actions is fundamental for adapting and optimizing behavior and depends on an action-monitoring system that assesses ongoing actions and detects errors. The neuronal network underlying this executive function, classically attributed to the rostral cingulate zone, is poorly characterized in humans, owing to the limited number of direct neurophysiological data. Using intracerebral recordings, we show that the leading role is played by the supplementary motor area (SMA), which rapidly evaluates successful and erroneous actions. The rostral part of medial prefrontal cortex, driven by the SMA, was activated later and exclusively in the case of errors. This suggests a hierarchical organization of the different frontal regions involved in implementation of action monitoring and error processing.
    Science 02/2014; 343(6173):888-91. DOI:10.1126/science.1247412 · 31.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Formal models of decision-making have traditionally focused on simple, two-choice perceptual decisions. To date, one of the most influential account of this process is Ratcliff’s drift diffusion model (DDM). However, the extension of the model to more complex decisions is not straightforward. In particular, conflicting situations, such as the Eriksen, Stroop, or Simon tasks, require control mechanisms that shield the cognitive system against distracting information. We adopted a novel strategy to constrain response time (RT) models by concurrently investigating two well-known empirical laws in conflict tasks, both at experimental and modeling levels. The two laws, predicted by the DDM, describe the relationship between mean RT and (i) target intensity (Piéron’s law), (ii) standard deviation of RT (Wagenmakers–Brown’s law). Pioneering work has shown that Piéron’s law holds in the Stroop task, and has highlighted an additive relationship between target intensity and compatibility. We found similar results in both Eriksen and Simon tasks. Compatibility also violated Wagenmakers–Brown’s law in a very similar and particular fashion in the two tasks, suggesting a common model framework. To investigate the nature of this commonality, predictions of two recent extensions of the DDM that incorporate selective attention mechanisms were simulated and compared to the experimental results. Both models predict Piéron’s law and the violation of Wagenmakers–Brown’s law by compatibility. Fits of the models to the RT distributions and accuracy data allowed us to further reveal their relative strengths and deficiencies. Combining experimental and computational results, this study sets the groundwork for a unified model of decision-making in conflicting environments.
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    ABSTRACT: Appropriate reactions to erroneous actions are essential to keeping behavior adaptive. Erring, however, is not an all-or-none process: electromyographic (EMG) recordings of the responding muscles have revealed that covert incorrect response activations (termed "partial errors") occur on a proportion of overtly correct trials. The occurrence of such "partial errors" shows that incorrect response activations could be corrected online, before turning into overt errors. In the present study, we showed that, unlike overt errors, such "partial errors" are poorly consciously detected by participants, who could report only one third of their partial errors. Two parameters of the partial errors were found to predict detection: the surface of the incorrect EMG burst (larger for detected) and the correction time (between the incorrect and correct EMG onsets; longer for detected). These two parameters provided independent information. The correct(ive) responses associated with detected partial errors were larger than the "pure-correct" ones, and this increase was likely a consequence, rather than a cause, of the detection. The respective impacts of the two parameters predicting detection (incorrect surface and correction time), along with the underlying physiological processes subtending partial-error detection, are discussed.
    Cognitive Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience 12/2013; 14(3). DOI:10.3758/s13415-013-0232-0 · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In conflict tasks, the irrelevant stimulus attribute needs to be suppressed for the correct response to be produced. In the Simon task, earlier researchers have proposed that this suppression is the reason that, after an initial increase, the interference effect decreases for longer RTs, as reflected by late, negative-going delta plots. This view has been challenged by observations of positive-going delta plots, even for long RTs, in other conflict tasks, despite a similar necessity for suppression. For late negative-going delta plots to be interpreted as reflecting suppression, a necessary, although maybe not sufficient, condition is that similar patterns should be observed for other conflict tasks. We reasoned that a similar suppression could be present, but hidden, in the Eriksen flanker task. By recording and analyzing electromyograms of the muscles involved in response execution, we could compute delta plots separately for trials that elicited a subthreshold incorrect response activation (partial error). Late negative-going delta plots were observable on partial-error trials, although they were weaker than for the Simon task, reducing the impact of this inversion on the overall distribution. We further showed that this pattern is modulated by time pressure. Those results indicate that mechanisms leading to negative-going delta plots, similar to those observed in the Simon task, are also at play in the Eriksen task. The link between negative-going delta plots and executive online control is discussed.
    Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 12/2013; 21(4). DOI:10.3758/s13423-013-0561-6 · 2.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We studied the impact of sleep deprivation on action monitoring. Each participant performed a Simon task after a normal night of sleep and after 26 h of awakening. Reaction time (RT) distributions were analyzed and the sensitivity of the error negativity (Ne/Ne like) to response correctness was examined.Results showed that (1) the Simon effect persisted for the longest RTs only after sleep deprivation and (2) the sensitivity of the Ne/Ne like to correctness decreased after sleep deprivation, especially on incongruent trials. This suggests that after sleep deprivation (1) the ability to inhibit prepotent response tendencies is impaired and (2) the sensitivity of a response monitoring system as revealed by the error negativity is less sensitive to performance.In conclusion, action monitoring was affected by sleep deprivation as revealed by distributional analyses and the sensitivity of the Ne/Ne like to performance, which may be attributed to the fragility of prefrontal structures to sleep deprivation.
    Biological psychology 04/2013; 93(1):237–245. DOI:10.1016/j.biopsycho.2013.02.004 · 3.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cortical regions involved in the different stages of speech production are relatively well-established, but their spatio-temporal dynamics remain poorly understood. In particular, the available studies have characterized neural events with respect to the onset of the stimulus triggering a verbal response. The core aspect of language production, however, is not perception but action. In this context, the most relevant question may not be how long after a stimulus brain events happen, but rather how long before the production act do they occur. We investigated speech production-related brain activity time-locked to vocal onset, in addition to the common stimulus-locked approach. We report the detailed temporal interplay between medial and left frontal activities occurring shortly before vocal onset. We interpret those as reflections of, respectively, word selection and word production processes. This medial-lateral organization is in line with that described in non-linguistic action control, suggesting that similar processes are at play in word production and non-linguistic action production. This novel view of the brain dynamics underlying word production provides a useful background for future investigations of the spatio-temporal brain dynamics that lead to the production of verbal responses.
    PLoS ONE 03/2013; 8(3):e58197. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0058197 · 3.53 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
270.50 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2015
    • Aix-Marseille Université
      • • Laboratoire Cognitive Neuroscience
      • • Laboratoire de Psychologie Cognitive (UMR 7290 LPC)
      • • Laboratoire de Neurobiologie de la Cognition (UMR 7291)
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
  • 1997–2014
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      • Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2009
    • University of Amsterdam
      • Department of Psychology
      Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2005
    • Université de Toulon
      La Garde-près-Toulon, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
  • 2002
    • University of Pennsylvania
      • Department of Psychology
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States