Madhav Thambisetty

National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

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Publications (42)305.78 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Recent evidence indicates that U1-70K and other U1 small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) are sarkosyl-insoluble and associate with tau neurofibrillary tangles selectively in Alzheimer disease (AD). Currently, the mechanisms underlying the conversion of soluble nuclear U1 snRNPs into insoluble cytoplasmic aggregates remain elusive. Based on the biochemical and subcellular distribution properties of U1-70K in AD we hypothesized that aggregated U1-70K itself or other biopolymers (e.g. proteins or nucleic acids) interact with and sequester natively folded soluble U1-70K into insoluble aggregates. Here we demonstrate that total homogenates from AD brain induce soluble U1-70K from control brain or recombinant U1-70K to become sarkosyl-insoluble. This effect was not dependent on RNA, and did not correlate with detergent-insoluble tau levels as AD homogenates with reduced levels of these components were still capable of inducing U1-70K aggregation. In contrast, proteinase K-treated AD homogenates and sarkosyl-soluble AD fractions were unable to induce U1-70K aggregation, indicating that aggregated proteins in AD brain are responsible for inducing soluble U1-70K aggregation. It was determined that the C-terminus of U1-70K, that harbors two disordered low-complexity (LC) domains, is necessary for U1-70K aggregation. Moreover, both LC1 and LC2 domains were sufficient for aggregation. Finally, protein cross-linking and mass spectrometry studies demonstrated that a U1-70K fragment harboring the LC1 domain directly interacts with aggregated U1-70K in AD brain. Our results support a hypothesis that aberrant forms of U1-70K in AD can directly sequester soluble forms of U1-70K into insoluble aggregates.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 10/2014; · 4.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although overweight and obesity are associated with poor health outcomes in the elderly, the biological bases of obesity-related behaviors during aging are poorly understood. Common variants in the FTO gene are associated with adiposity in children and younger adults as well as with adverse mental health in older individuals. However, it is unclear whether FTO influences longitudinal trajectories of adiposity and other intermediate phenotypes relevant to mental health during aging. We examined whether a commonly carried obesity-risk variant in the FTO gene (rs1421085 single-nucleotide polymorphism) influences adiposity and is associated with changes in brain function in participants within the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, one of the longest-running longitudinal aging studies in the United States. Our results show that obesity-related risk allele carriers of FTO gene show dose-dependent increments in body mass index during aging. Moreover, the obesity-related risk allele is associated with reduced medial prefrontal cortical function during aging. Consistent with reduced brain function in regions intrinsic to impulse control and taste responsiveness, risk allele carriers of FTO exhibit dose-dependent increments in both impulsivity and intake of fatty foods. We propose that a common neural mechanism may underlie obesity-associated impulsivity and increased consumption of high-calorie foods during aging.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 27 May 2014; doi:10.1038/mp.2014.49.
    Molecular Psychiatry 05/2014; · 15.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We recently identified U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) tangle-like aggregates and RNA splicing abnormalities in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). However little is known about snRNP biology in early onset AD due to autosomal dominant genetic mutations or trisomy 21 in Down syndrome. Therefore we investigated snRNP biochemical and pathologic features in these disorders. We performed quantitative proteomics and immunohistochemistry in postmortem brain from genetic AD cases. Electron microscopy was used to characterize ultrastructural features of pathologic aggregates. U1-70k and other snRNPs were biochemically enriched in the insoluble fraction of human brain from subjects with presenilin 1 (PS1) mutations. Aggregates of U1 snRNP-immunoreactivity formed cytoplasmic tangle-like structures in cortex of AD subjects with PS1 and amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations as well as trisomy 21. Ultrastructural analysis with electron microscopy in an APP mutation case demonstrated snRNP immunogold labeling of paired helical filaments (PHF). These studies identify U1 snRNP pathologic changes in brain of early onset genetic forms of AD. Since dominant genetic mutations and trisomy 21 result in dysfunctional amyloid processing, the findings suggest that aberrant beta-amyloid processing may influence U1 snRNP aggregate formation.
    Molecular Neurodegeneration 04/2014; 9(1):15. · 5.29 Impact Factor
  • Madhav Thambisetty, Luigi Ferrucci
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 04/2014; 62(4). · 4.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine produced by immune cells and other cell types such as microglia throughout the brain. Higher levels of IL-6 in older adults have been cross-sectionally and longitudinally associated with physical and cognitive impairment, as well as increased dementia risk. The association between IL-6 levels and structural and functional brain changes is less clear. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between IL-6 concentrations and cortical thinning with aging. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging were analyzed for 121 older subjects (M = 69.3; SD = 7.3; range = 56.1–85.9 yrs) who were repeatedly tested over an average period of 7.5 yrs, and who remained non-demented for the entire follow-up period. The Freesurfer longitudinal processing stream was utilized for image processing, and IL-6 measures were based on serum ELISA assays averaged across time points. Results showed that higher mean IL-6 concentrations were associated with accelerated annual rates of cortical thinning in the inferior temporal poles bilaterally. Additional pronounced regions of IL-6 -accelerated thinning included the transverse frontopolar gyri within the left hemisphere, and subcentral gyrus and sulcus within the right hemisphere. Our results indicate that sustained high levels of the inflammatory biomarker IL-6 are associated with regionally increased rates of age-related cortical thinning. These data build on previous findings that link IL-6 to chronic disease and demonstrate one mechanism through which high levels of inflammation may have adverse effects on physical and cognitive function.
    Translational Neuroscience. 03/2014; 5(1):1-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and has no cure. Genetic, cell biological, and biochemical studies suggest that reducing amyloid-β (Aβ) production may serve as a rational therapeutic avenue to delay or prevent AD progression. Inhibition of RhoA, a Rho GTPase family member, is proposed to curb Aβ production. However, a barrier to this hypothesis has been the limited understanding of how the principal downstream effectors of RhoA, Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) 1 and ROCK2, modulate Aβ generation. Here, we report that ROCK1 knockdown increased endogenous human Aβ production, whereas ROCK2 knockdown decreased Aβ levels. Inhibition of ROCK2 kinase activity, using an isoform-selective small molecule (SR3677), suppressed β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) enzymatic action and diminished production of Aβ in AD mouse brain. Immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analyses revealed that SR3677 alters BACE1 endocytic distribution and promotes amyloid precursor protein (APP) traffic to lysosomes. Moreover, SR3677 blocked ROCK2 phosphorylation of APP at threonine 654 (T654); in neurons, T654 was critical for APP processing to Aβ. These observations suggest that ROCK2 inhibition reduces Aβ levels through independent mechanisms. Finally, ROCK2 protein levels were increased in asymptomatic AD, mild cognitive impairment, and AD brains, demonstrating that ROCK2 levels change in the earliest stages of AD and remain elevated throughout disease progression. Collectively, these findings highlight ROCK2 as a mechanism-based therapeutic target to combat Aβ production in AD.
    Journal of Neuroscience 12/2013; 33(49):19086-98. · 6.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many neurodegenerative disorders involve the abnormal accumulation of proteins. In addition to the pathologic hallmarks of neurofibrillary tangles and β-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD), here we show that abnormal accumulations of gephyrin, an inhibitory receptor-anchoring protein, are highly correlated with the neuropathologic diagnosis of AD in 17 AD versus 14 control cases. Furthermore, gephyrin accumulations were specific for AD and not seen in normal controls or other neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson disease, corticobasal degeneration, and frontotemporal degeneration. Gephyrin accumulations in AD overlapped with β-amyloid plaques and, more rarely, neurofibrillary tangles. Biochemical and proteomic studies of AD and control brain samples suggested alterations in gephyrin solubility and reveal elevated levels of gephyrin lower-molecular-weight species in the AD insoluble fraction. Because gephyrin is involved in synaptic organization and synaptic dysfunction is an early event in AD, these findings point to its possible role in the pathogenesis of AD.
    Journal of neuropathology and experimental neurology. 10/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Abberant lipid metabolism is implicated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathophysiology, but the connections between AD and lipid metabolic pathways are not fully understood. To investigate plasma lipids in AD, a multiplatform screen (N=35 by LC-MS and N=35 by NMR) was developed which enabled the comprehensive analysis of plasma from three groups (AD, MCI and age matched control). This screen identified three phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules that were significantly diminished in AD cases. In a subsequent validation study (N=141), PC variation in a bigger sample set was investigated. These three PCs were again significantly lower in AD cases: PC 16:0/20:5 (p<0.001), 16:0/22:6 (p<0.05) and 18:0/22:6 (p<0.01). A receiver operated characteristic (ROC) analysis of the PCs combined with ApoE data produced an area under the curve predictive value of 0.828. Confirmatory investigations into the background biochemistry indiciated no significant plasma change in three further PCs of similar structure, total choline containing compounds or three fatty acid side chains, adding to the evidence that specific PCs play a role in AD pathology.
    Neurobiology of Aging 09/2013; · 4.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE Peripheral glucose homeostasis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). The relationship among diabetes mellitus, insulin, and AD is an important area of investigation. However, whether cognitive impairment seen in those with diabetes is mediated by excess pathological features of AD or other related abnormalities, such as vascular disease, remains unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between serial measures of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance and in vivo brain β-amyloid burden, measured with carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B (11C-PiB), and AD pathology at autopsy. DESIGN Scores calculated from the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) and Braak criteria were correlated with measures of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance in 197 participants who underwent autopsy after death and who had undergone 2 or more oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) using grouped analyses and a continuous mixed-models analysis. The same measures of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance were also correlated with brain 11C-PiB retention in an additional 53 living subjects from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging neuroimaging study. SETTING Prospective, serially assessed cohort of community-dwelling subjects. PARTICIPANTS Cohort 1 consisted of 197 participants enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging who had 2 or more OGTTs during life and a complete brain autopsy after death. Cohort 2 consisted of 53 living subjects who had 2 or more OGTTs and underwent brain 11C-PiB positron emission tomography. EXPOSURES Autopsy and 11C-PiB positron emission tomography. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The correlation of brain markers of AD, including CERAD score, Braak score, and 11C-PiB retention, with serum markers of glucose homeostasis using grouped and continuous mixed-models analyses. RESULTS We found no significant correlations between measures of brain AD pathology or 11C-PiB β-amyloid load and glucose intolerance or insulin resistance in subjects who had a mean (SD) of 6.4 (3.2) OGTTs during 22.1 (8.0) years of follow-up. Thirty subjects with frank diabetes mellitus who received medications also had AD pathology scores that were similar to those of the cohort as a whole. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In this prospective cohort with multiple assessments of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, measures of glucose and insulin homeostasis are not associated with AD pathology and likely play little role in AD pathogenesis. Long-term therapeutic trials are important to elucidate this issue.
    JAMA neurology. 07/2013;
  • Madhav Thambisetty, Yang An, Toshiko Tanaka
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the recent identification of several novel risk genes for Alzheimer's disease (AD), little is known about their influence on the age at onset (AAO) of AD. The AAO is a phenotype with a heritable component distinct from disease risk and may be a useful trait to study in the context of developing interventions for delaying the onset of AD. We studied the influence of 10 recently identified AD risk genes and APOE in relation to AAO in a large cohort of AD patients (N = 2569). We find that the novel AD risk gene, PICALM, exerts a small effect on the AAO of AD with earlier disease onset in risk allele carriers. In addition, we confirmed the previously reported association between the APOE ε4 allele and earlier disease onset. None of the other AD risk genes influenced AAO of AD. Our results suggest that besides APOE, other genes associated with AD risk do not exert large effects on the AAO phenotype of AD.
    Neurobiology of aging 07/2013; · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated whether individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in midlife subsequently show regionally specific longitudinal changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) relative to those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Sixty-four cognitively normal participants in the neuroimaging substudy of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging underwent serial (15)O-water positron emission tomography scans (age at first scan, 69.6 ± 7.5 years) and oral glucose tolerance tests 12 years earlier (age at first oral glucose tolerance test, 57.2 ± 11.1 years). Using voxel-based analysis, we compared changes in rCBF over an 8-year period between 15 participants with IGT in midlife and 49 with NGT. Significant differences were observed in longitudinal change in rCBF between the IGT and NGT groups. The predominant pattern was greater rCBF decline in the IGT group in the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortices. Some brain regions in the frontal and temporal cortices also showed greater longitudinal increments in rCBF in the IGT group. Our findings suggest that IGT in midlife is associated with subsequent longitudinal changes in brain function during aging even in cognitively normal older individuals.
    Neurobiology of aging 04/2013; · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has provided some of the most prom-ising source of validated biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Such bio-markers are critical to the development of novel disease modifying treatments for use in research and clinical practice. There is great interest in specific CSF protein candidates for measuring the earliest stages of disease progression and improving the clinical utility of traditional AD biomarkers for accurate diagnosis. Methods: Data acquired from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging (ADNI) study was used in this study. Levels of 159 CSF ana-lytes were measured using the Rules Based Medicine (RBM, Austin, TX) Hu-man Discovery Multi-Analyte Profile 1.0 panel. Global volumetric and regional thickness MRI measurements were determined in 295 ADNI subjects (AD¼65, MCI¼142, HC¼88) acquired at baseline using Freesurfer 5.1.0. The multiplex analyte panel was used to identify a subset of proteins predictive of hippocampal and entorhinal cortex (ERC) atrophy. Another avenue of study also examined the combination of the analyte panel with traditional CSF bio-markers (Ab142, p-tau, t-tau) and structural MRI measures to 1) distinguish between AD and healthy controls subjects and 2) predict future MCI to AD conversion at a one year follow up. Results: Multiple linear regression anal-ysis by cross validation identified a subset of analytes (FABP, predictive of hippocampal atrophy (5 fold cross validation R 2 ¼ 35.6%). Several of these analytes (FABP, CgA, prolactin, apoD, TM, NGAL, clusterin) were also predictive of ERC thickness atrophy (5 fold cross validation R 2 ¼ 30.2%) and related to rapid clinical progression in AD. Com-bining the analyte panel with MRI and traditional CSF biomarkers (Ab 1-42, p-tau 181, and t-tau) produced the best model for distinguishing between AD and HC subjects at baseline (92.7%) and predicting MCI conversion to AD at a one year follow up (82.4%). Conclusions: Novel analyte candidates in CSF were identified in relation to brain atrophy and complement existing AD biomarkers for AD classification and future MCI conversion predic-tion. This may suggest a role of these proteins in AD pathogenesis and disease progression. Further work is required in independent samples to replicate these findings.
    AD/PD 2013, Florence Italy; 03/2013
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The rs3818361 single nucleotide polymorphism in complement component (3b/4b) receptor-1 (CR1) is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although this novel variant is associated with a small effect size and is unlikely to be useful as a predictor of AD risk, it might provide insights into AD pathogenesis. We examined the association between rs3818361 and brain amyloid deposition in nondemented older individuals. METHODS: We used (11)C-Pittsburgh Compound-B positron emission tomography to quantify brain amyloid burden in 57 nondemented older individuals (mean age 78.5 years) in the neuroimaging substudy of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. In a replication study, we analyzed (11)C-Pittsburgh Compound-B positron emission tomography data from 22 cognitively normal older individuals (mean age 77.1 years) in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative dataset. RESULTS: Risk allele carriers of rs3818361 have lower brain amyloid burden relative to noncarriers. There is a strikingly greater variability in brain amyloid deposition in the noncarrier group relative to risk carriers, an effect explained partly by APOE genotype. In noncarriers of the CR1 risk allele, APOE ε4 individuals showed significantly higher brain amyloid burden relative to APOE ε4 noncarriers. We also independently replicate our observation of lower brain amyloid burden in risk allele carriers of rs3818361 in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative sample. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest complex mechanisms underlying the interaction of CR1, APOE, and brain amyloid pathways in AD. Our results are relevant to treatments targeting brain Aβ in nondemented individuals at risk for AD and suggest that clinical outcomes of such treatments might be influenced by complex gene-gene interactions.
    Biological psychiatry 09/2012; · 8.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Changes in brain amyloid burden have been shown to relate to Alzheimer's disease pathology, and are believed to precede the development of cognitive decline. There is thus a need for inexpensive and non-invasive screening methods that are able to accurately estimate brain amyloid burden as a marker of Alzheimer's disease. One potential method would involve using demographic information and measurements on plasma samples to establish biomarkers of brain amyloid burden; in this study data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative was used to explore this possibility. Sixteen of the analytes on the Rules Based Medicine Human Discovery Multi-Analyte Profile 1.0 panel were found to associate with [(11)C]-PiB PET measurements. Some of these markers of brain amyloid burden were also found to associate with other AD related phenotypes. Thirteen of these markers of brain amyloid burden - c-peptide, fibrinogen, alpha-1-antitrypsin, pancreatic polypeptide, complement C3, vitronectin, cortisol, AXL receptor kinase, interleukin-3, interleukin-13, matrix metalloproteinase-9 total, apolipoprotein E and immunoglobulin E - were used along with co-variates in multiple linear regression, and were shown by cross-validation to explain >30% of the variance of brain amyloid burden. When a threshold was used to classify subjects as PiB positive, the regression model was found to predict actual PiB positive individuals with a sensitivity of 0.918 and a specificity of 0.545. The number of APOE ϵ 4 alleles and plasma apolipoprotein E level were found to contribute most to this model, and the relationship between these variables and brain amyloid burden was explored.
    PLoS ONE 09/2012; 7(9):e44260. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several studies have reported changes in emotional memory and processing in people with ALS (pwALS). In this study, we sought to analyse differences in emotional processing and memory between pwALS and healthy controls and to investigate the relationship between emotional memory and self-reported depression. Nineteen pwALS and 19 healthy controls were assessed on measures of emotional processing, emotional memory, verbal memory and depression. Although pwALS and controls did not differ significantly on measures of emotional memory, a subgroup of patients performed poorly on an emotional recognition task. With regard to emotional processing, pwALS gave significantly stronger ratings of emotional valence to positive words than to negative words. Higher ratings of emotional words were associated with better recall in controls but not pwALS. Self-reported depression and emotional processing or memory variables were not associated in either group. In conclusion, the results from this small study suggest that a subgroup of pwALS may show weakened 'emotional enhancement', although in the current sample this may reflect general memory impairment rather than specific changes in emotional memory. Nonetheless, different patterns of processing of emotionally-salient material by pwALS may have care and management-related implications.
    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis 08/2012; 13(6):592-8. · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND A blood-based test that could be used as a screen for Alzheimer disease (AD) may enable early intervention and better access to treatment. OBJECTIVE To apply a multiplex immunoassay panel to identify plasma biomarkers of AD using plasma samples from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative cohort. DESIGN Cohort study. SETTING The Biomarkers Consortium Alzheimer's Disease Plasma Proteomics Project. PARTICIPANTS Plasma samples at baseline and at 1 year were analyzed from 396 (345 at 1 year) patients with mild cognitive impairment, 112 (97 at 1 year) patients with AD, and 58 (54 at 1 year) healthy control subjects. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Multivariate and univariate statistical analyses were used to examine differences across diagnostic groups and relative to the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype. RESULTS Increased levels of eotaxin 3, pancreatic polypeptide, and N-terminal protein B-type brain natriuretic peptide were observed in patients, confirming similar changes reported in cerebrospinal fluid samples of patients with AD and MCI. Increases in tenascin C levels and decreases in IgM and ApoE levels were also observed. All participants with Apoϵ3 /ϵ4 or ϵ4 /ϵ4 alleles showed a distinct biochemical profile characterized by low C-reactive protein and ApoE levels and by high cortisol, interleukin 13, apolipoprotein B, and gamma interferon levels. The use of plasma biomarkers improved specificity in differentiating patients with AD from controls, and ApoE plasma levels were lowest in patients whose mild cognitive impairment had progressed to dementia. CONCLUSIONS Plasma biomarker results confirm cerebrospinal fluid studies reporting increased levels of pancreatic polypeptide and N-terminal protein B-type brain natriuretic peptide in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment. Incorporation of plasma biomarkers yielded high sensitivity with improved specificity, supporting their usefulness as a screening tool. The ApoE genotype was associated with a unique biochemical profile irrespective of diagnosis, highlighting the importance of genotype on blood protein profiles.
    Archives of neurology 07/2012; · 7.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We examined the effect of the novel Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk variant rs11136000 single nucleotide polymorphism in the clusterin gene (CLU) on longitudinal changes in resting state regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during normal aging and investigated its influence on cognitive decline in presymptomatic stages of disease progression. METHODS: Subjects were participants in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. A subset of 88 cognitively normal older individuals had longitudinal (15)O-water positron emission tomography measurements of rCBF at baseline and up to eight annual follow-up visits. We also analyzed trajectories of cognitive decline among CLU risk carriers and noncarriers in individuals who remained cognitively normal (n = 599), as well as in those who subsequently converted to mild cognitive impairment or AD (n = 95). RESULTS: Cognitively normal carriers of the CLU risk allele showed significant and dose-dependent longitudinal increases in resting state rCBF in brain regions intrinsic to memory processes. There were no differences in trajectories of memory performance between CLU risk carriers and noncarriers who remained cognitively normal. However, in cognitively normal individuals who eventually converted to mild cognitive impairment or AD, CLU risk carriers showed faster rates of decline in memory performance relative to noncarriers in the presymptomatic stages of disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: The AD risk variant CLU influences longitudinal changes in brain function in asymptomatic individuals and is associated with faster cognitive decline in presymptomatic stages of disease progression. These results suggest mechanisms underlying the role of CLU in AD and may be important in monitoring disease progression in at-risk elderly.
    Biological psychiatry 07/2012; · 8.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Framingham Heart Study group cardiovascular disease risk profile (FCRP) score was used to assess the relationship between baseline cardiovascular risk and subsequent changes in resting state cerebral blood flow (CBF) in cognitively normal older participants from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Ninty-seven cognitively normal participants underwent annual resting-state positron emission tomography scans at baseline and over a period of up to 8 years (mean interval, 7.4 years). Images quantifying voxel-wise longitudinal rates of CBF change were calculated and used to examine the relationship between baseline FCRP score and changes over time in regional CBF. Individual components of the FCRP score (age, cholesterol, blood pressure, smoking status, and type 2 diabetes) were also correlated with changes in regional CBF to examine the independent contributions of each component to the overall pattern of change. Higher baseline FCRP scores were associated with accelerated longitudinal decline in CBF in orbitofrontal, medial frontal/anterior cingulate, insular, precuneus, and brain stem regions. Of the components that comprise the FCRP score, higher diastolic blood pressure and diabetes were associated independently with greater decline in the medial frontal/anterior cingulate and insular regions, respectively. Baseline cardiovascular risk factors are associated with greater rates of decline in resting state regional brain function. The regions showing accelerated decline participate in higher-order cognitive processes and are also vulnerable to age-related neuropathology. These results, in conjunction with other studies, encourage early treatment of cardiovascular risk factors in older individuals.
    Stroke 04/2012; 43(6):1542-7. · 6.02 Impact Factor
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    Neurobiology of aging 01/2012; 33:1486.e9-15. · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    Neurobiology of aging 01/2012; 33:1486.e9-15. · 5.94 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

693 Citations
305.78 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2014
    • National Institute on Aging
      • Laboratory of Personality and Cognition (LPC)
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
    • ICL
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2006–2010
    • King's College London
      • • Institute of Psychiatry
      • • MRC Centre for Neurodegeneration Research
      London, ENG, United Kingdom