N Maingi

Kenya Wildlife Service, Nairoba, Nairobi Area, Kenya

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Publications (34)51.29 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is an emerging viral disease spreading throughout Kenya and East Africa causing major losses in the small stock. This study is an attempt to evaluate small stock management practices in Turkana pastoral system, Kenya as predictors of PPR outbreaks. Information on the social practices and the occurrence of PPR outbreaks was obtained by participatory techniques. The small stock management practices, evaluated as factors, in a previous study were simultaneously analyzed with seasons and administrative divisions as the independent risk factors for the presence or absence of PPR outbreaks in 142 Adakars (villages) as the dependent variable. Analyses were carried out for the years 2009 and 2010 combined as one data set and considered as longitudinal repeated data. In the analyses, the presence or absence of PPR outbreaks was the dependent variable. Data were further analyzed separately disaggregated by season where the presence or absence of PPR outbreaks in a season was considered as the dependent variable. All analyses utilized multivariable logistical regression analyses. In the longitudinal analysis, season was the only significant factor associated with PPR outbreak. Disaggregating the data by season revealed that certain seasonal-specific livestock management activities increased the risk of reporting PPR outbreaks: (1) sharing water sources leading to social aggregation of young stock in one point (Factor 3) (odds ratio (OR) = 2.0) in season 2 (wet season) of 2009; (2) sick dams left to nurse their young kids/lambs (Factor 7) (OR=1.62) in the same season in 2010. The finding of diverse risk factors in the same seasons across years suggests temporal heterogeneity in the distribution and occurrence of the determinants of PPR in the Turkana ecosystem. The study discusses the implications of these findings on disease control.
    RESEARCH OPINIONS IN ANIMAL & VETERINARY SCIENCES. 08/2013; 3(9):303-314.
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    The 3rd RUFORUM Biennial Conference, 24th – 28th September 2012 Entebbe; 06/2013
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Taenia solium is an important zoonosis in many developing countries. Cysticercosis poses a serious public health risk and leads to economic losses to the pig production industry. Due to scarcity of data on the epidemiology of porcine cysticercosis in Kenya, the present study was conducted to determine the prevalence and risk factors for porcine cysticercosis within Homa Bay district. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2010, and a total of 392 pigs were recruited in a household survey, with all being tested by ante-mortem lingual palpation (together with questionnaire data on pig production, occurrence and transmission of porcine cysticercosis, risk factors and awareness of porcine cysticercosis collected from the households from which pigs were sampled). Sufficient serum was collected from 232 of the pigs to be tested for the presence of circulating parasite antigen using a monoclonal antibody-based sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Ag-ELISA). RESULTS: Seventy six pigs were found positive by the Ag-ELISA (32.8%, 95% C.I. 26.8-39.2%), while by tongue inspection cysticerci were detected in 22/ 392 pigs (5.6% 95% C.I. 3.6-8.4%).The most important risk factor for porcine cysticercosis in the Homa Bay area was for pigs to belong to a farm where latrine use by members of the household was not evident (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.13--2.37) . CONCLUSION: The present findings indicate that porcine cysticercosis is endemic in Homa Bay District, and that latrine provision, in conjunction with free-range pig keeping contributes significantly to porcine cysticercosis transmission.
    BMC Veterinary Research 12/2012; 8(1):234. · 1.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peste des petit ruminants (PPR), a viral disease of sheep and goats, invaded Kenya through Turkana district in 2006. Kenya had remained uninfected with PPR despite bordering countries (Ethiopia, Sudan and Somalia) that were reported endemic with the disease. This study evaluated the small ruminants’ pastoral management practices of Turkana pastoral herders as part of a participatory risk assessment looking at the social cultural and small stock husbandry activities that may facilitate exposure of sheep and goats to possible Peste des petit ruminants (PPR) infective herds or animals. The social cultural and small stock husbandry activities were represented by 62 variables in Peste des petit ruminants risk assessment questionnaire which were analyzed using factor analysis. The risk assessment questionnaire was developed as a Likert scale based on summated rating scale format. The risk assessment questionnaire was applied to 142 villages (Adakars) across six administrative divisions in north and west of Turkana District. Factor analysis extracted 7 factors that accounted for 45.3% of the variance in the reworked 49 variables analyzed. These extracted factors were thus taken as the salient factors that explained small ruminant pastoral management practices of Turkana pastoral herders as follows: 1 indiscriminate mixing of vulnerable small stock groups with high risk groups within herds; 2 introduction of new animals into the herds; 3 share watering sources leading concentration of vulnerable young stock in one point; 4 foreign livestock from across international borders grazing in local pastures; 5 nomadism and transhumance; 6 local culture of borrowing and loaning of livestock; 7 sick dams left to nurse their young kids and lambs. These seven management factors were evaluated in a regression analysis of PPR as predictors of PPR outbreak in last one and two years. The results are presented in a subsequent paper.
    RESEARCH OPINIONS IN ANIMAL & VETERINARY SCIENCES. 11/2012; 2(9):503-510.
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    ABSTRACT: SUMMARY The sanitary control of threatened wild animals is of pivotal interest for their conservation. This task, however, is highly complex in wildlife/livestock systems. In this paper we report findings from a 2-year cross-sectional study of the epidemiology and attempted control of a Sarcoptes mite infestation in the threatened cheetah population in Masai Mara (Kenya), and discuss its interaction with sympatric wild (lion, wildebeest and Thomson's gazelle) and domestic (dog, cattle and sheep) animals. Sarcoptes scabiei was isolated from cheetahs, Thomson's gazelles, wildebeests, lions, cattle, goats and dogs; Psoroptes ovis, on the other hand, was only isolated from sheep. The prevalence study revealed 12·77% infection rates in cheetahs, 4·7% in dogs, 0·8% in Thomson's gazelles, 0·8% in sheep, 0·09% in cattle, and 0·09% in goats, while it opportunistically affected lions and wildebeest. Our study revealed that prevalence of Sarcoptes mite in cheetah population was not associated with the studied geographical blocks, animal sex or the presence of affected domestic animals. Cheetah infection with S. scabiei was associated with the climatic conditions (dry more than wet season) and the balancing between the total number of Thomson's gazelles and the prevalence of infected individuals. Apparently the high prevalence of mangy gazelles has a negative effect on cheetah; this negative effect was reduced when the number of healthy gazelles was increased. Treatment with injectable ivermectin of the clinically affected wild and domestic animals during the first year of this study was associated with much lower incidence of sarcoptic mange during the second year.
    Parasitology 07/2012; 139(12):1587-95. · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pastoralists in low-income countries usually live in close proximity to their animals and thus represent an important repository of information about livestock disease. Since wild and domestic animals often mix freely whilst grazing, pastoralists are also able to observe first-hand the diseases that are present in wildlife and as such are key informants in disease outbreaks in sylvatic animals. We report here the findings of the first study of the knowledge and role of Masai pastoralists in mange in wildlife and livestock in Masai Mara, Kenya. In this paper we describe the knowledge of mange accrued by 56 Masai pastoralists in Kenya and how they respond to it in both wildlife and livestock. In total, 52 (93%) pastoralists had a clear idea of the clinical appearance of mange, 13 (23%) understood its aetiology and 37 (66%) knew that mites were the causal agent. Thirty-nine (69%) believed that mange cross-infection between domestic and wild animals occurs, while 48 (85%) had observed mange in domestic animals including sheep (77%), goats (57%), dogs (24%) and cattle (14%). The pastoralists had also observed wild animals infected with mange, above all lions (19%), gazelles (14%), cheetahs (12%) and wildebeests (2%). In 68% of cases Masai pastoralists treat mange infection or apply control measures, most commonly via the topical use of acaricides (29%) and/or the reporting of the outbreak to the veterinary authorities (21%). In the period 2007-2011, Kenya Wildlife Service received 24 warnings of 59 wild animals with mange-like lesions from the Masai Mara pastoralist community. The reported species were cheetah, lion, wild dog, Thomson's gazelle and wildebeest. Masai pastoralists have good knowledge of mange epidemiology and treatment. Their observations and the treatments they apply are valuable in the control of this disease in both wild and domestic animals.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(8):e43342. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, there have been attempts to understand the molecular epidemiology of Sarcoptes scabiei, to evaluate the gene flow between isolates of S. scabiei from different hosts and geographic regions. However, to our knowledge, a molecular study has not been carried out to assess the molecular diversity and gene flow of Sarcoptes mite in a predator/prey ecosystem. Our study revealed an absence of gene flow between the two herbivore (Thomson's gazelle and wildebeest)- and between the two carnivore (lion and cheetah)-derived Sarcoptes populations from Masai Mara (Kenya), which is in discrepancy with the host-taxon law described for wild animals in Europe. Lion- and wildebeest-derived Sarcoptes mite populations were similar yet different from the Thomson's gazelle-derived Sarcoptes population. This could be attributed to Sarcoptes cross-infestation from wildebeest ("favourite prey") of the lion, but not from Thomson's gazelle. The cheetah-derived Sarcoptes population had different subpopulations: one is cheetah-private, one similar to the wildebeest- and lion-derived Sarcoptes populations, and another similar to the Thomson's gazelle-derived Sarcoptes mite population, where both wildebeest and Thomson's gazelle are "favourite preys" for the cheetah. In a predator/prey ecosystem, like Masai Mara in Kenya, it seems that Sarcoptes infestation in wild animals is prey-to-predator-wise, depending on the predator's "favourite prey". More studies on the lion and cheetah diet and behaviour could be of great help to clarify the addressed hypotheses. This study could have further ramification in the epidemiological studies and the monitoring protocols of the neglected Sarcoptes mite in predator/prey ecosystems.
    Parasites & Vectors 01/2011; 4:193. · 3.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Conventional treatment that eliminates other gastrointestinal nematodes has failed to show adequate efficacy against Trichuris trichura in non-human primates (NHPs). We investigated the efficacy of albendazole and ivermectin against natural infestation of nematodes in non human primates. 18 vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) and 21 baboons (Papio anubis) were divided into three treatment groups comprising of 6 vervets and 7 baboons per group. Albendazole (ABZ, 7.5mg/kg) was administered orally, and ivermectin (IVM, 300μg/kg) subcutaneously, each for three consecutive days. Group I animals were treated with a combination of albendazole and ivermectin, Group II ABZ alone, while Group III animals were treated with IVM alone. Faecal samples were collected at 0, 7, 14 and 28 days post treatment (dpt) and analysed for the presence of faecal eggs using the McMaster and formol ether acetyl (FEA) methods. Faecal egg count reduction percentage (FECR (%)) and cure rate (CR (%) i.e. percentage of faecal egg negative individuals after treatment) were used to determine the efficacy of the treatment regimens. The FEA method was found to be a more sensitive assessment method than the McMaster technique. When both methods were used the helminths observed included Trichuris trichura (100% in both NHPs) and strongyles (29.4% in vervets and 28.6% in baboons). In vervets, the FECR of T. trichura at 28 dpt was 100% (Group I), 75% (Group II) and 0% (Group III) while the CR (at the same time point) was 100% (Group I), 60% (Group II) and 0% (Group III). In baboons, the FECR% and CR% of T. trichura at 28dpt, for groups I, II, III was 100%, 100%, 0%, respectively. All the three drug regimens were curative (100%) of strongyles at 28 dpt. It is concluded that a combined ivermectin and albendazole treatment for 3 days is effective in treating T. trichura and strongyles infections in vervet monkeys and baboons. Further trials should be conducted using a bigger sample size as well as in other primates including humans.
    Scandinavian Journal of Laboratory Animal Science 01/2011; Volume 38(Issue 3):Page 187 - 193. · 0.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Porcine cysticercosis is an emerging zoonosis with public health and economic importance. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to investigate the disease in free-range pigs on 182 smallholder farms in Busia District, Kenya. The survey households were selected using a snowballing technique. Serum samples were obtained from 284 pigs of all ages at farm level and 37 pigs from slaughter slabs in the study area. The samples were analysed for the presence of cysticercus antigen using an antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A structured questionnaire was administered to determine the risk factors for porcine cysticercosis on the study farms. At pig level, the total number of pigs testing positive were 11, resulting in a seroprevalence of 4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.9-6.2%), while the farms with a positive pig were 9% (95% CI: 3.9-14.1%). All pigs examined in the slaughter slab survey were seronegative. The distribution of possible risk factors for porcine cysticercosis that were observed at farm level was as follows: free-range pig keeping (100%), history of human taeniosis infection in a family (51%), slaughtering of pigs at home (20%), lack of meat inspection (15%) and absence of latrines (15%). The only significant (χ2 = 4.4, P = 0.034, odds ratio (OR) = 3.8) risk factor associated with the occurrence of cysticercosis was lack of latrines at household level. The study shows that porcine cysticercosis is prevalent in free-range pigs in Busia District, Kenya and thus control measures need to be instituted.
    Journal of Helminthology 02/2010; 84(4):398-403. · 1.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The characteristics of markets for free-range pigs in Busia District, Kenya were determined using retrospective analysis of veterinary records, key informant interviews and questionnaire survey. A total of 8,377 pigs were slaughtered between 2001 and 2005, which accounted for 27% of all the livestock slaughtered and inspected by the government officers. Loss of fetuses was recorded for 13% of slaughtered pigs and the loss was attributed to ignorance on pregnancy diagnosis. Although most of the money (82%) generated by the veterinary department arose from meat inspection fees, constraints including limited personnel and lack of enough vehicles were observed. The marketing system comprised of farmers, middlemen, slaughter-slab owners and butchers, while the government played the role of meat inspection. Majority of the butchers were males (94%) with a mean age of 39 (range: 21-74) years. The majority (63%) had a primary school level of education. The average net income per annum for each butcher was 887 USD and the profit earned per pig was 3.8 USD. The major constraints which affected the butchery business included conflicts with regulatory authorities, high government levies, erratic number of slaughter pigs mainly due to African Swine Fever (ASF) and poor mode of transportation. There is a need to address these constraints especially the control of ASF, reduction in levies and provision of incentives to improve pig trade in Busia District.
    Tanzania Veterinary Journal. 01/2010; 27.
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of anthelmintics treatments in controlling gastrointestinal nematodes in breeding ewes in a semi-arid area of Kenya were determined. The study carried out during two breeding seasons, between June 2000 and December 2001 where albendazole was administered to groups of ewes, 2 weeks before mating, 3 weeks to lambing and mid lactation indicated significantly lower nematode egg counts in treated than untreated groups of ewes. In the first breeding season, reduced rainfall resulted in pasture scarcity and weight loss in both groups of ewes through out the gestation period, but losses were higher for the untreated group. In the second season, both groups of ewes showed a steady increase in weight gain during the gestation period and post-partum, but weight gains were higher in the treated group. In lambs, weight gains at 6 weeks were higher for treated ewes than control groups, in both breeding seasons. The results of this trial indicate that anthelmintic treatments in breeding ewes in the study area are beneficial in reducing gastrointestinal nematode infections and improving performance of the ewes and their lambs. In addition to the treatments, breeding ewes should be given feed supplementation particularly during periods of pasture scarcity.
    Tropical Animal Health and Production 02/2009; 41(6):921-6. · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An investigation was carried out to assess the effects of weather on the occurrence and magnitude of the periparturient rise (PPR) in trichostrongylid nematode egg output in breeding Dorper ewes. The study was conducted over three breeding seasons on a ranch in the semi-arid area of Kajiado District in Kenya between June 1999 and December 2001. During each breeding season 20 ewes randomly selected from the breeding stock and 20 others selected from the unmated yearlings were monitored for faecal strongyle egg counts every 3 weeks. The lambing seasons were timed to coincide with the onset of the short rains (October-November 1999), the mid-short rains (November-December 2000) and the end of the dry season (September-October 2001). In each season higher egg outputs were recorded in the peri-parturient ewes compared to the unmated yearlings. The highest PPR occurred in September 2001, when lambing coincided with the end of the dry season, possibly as a result of maturation of hypobiotic larvae. The lowest PPR occurred in November 2000 when the onset of lambing coincided with the mid-short rains, possibly owing to low pasture infectivity associated with a long dry spell between January and October of the same year. The results of this study indicate that PPR occurred when lambing coincided with both the wet and the dry seasons. However, the magnitude was greatly influenced by the season when lambing occurred. It was also influenced by resumption of development of hypobiotic larvae and the nutritional status of the ewes. Not only should control of gastrointestinal nematode parasites in this area aim at preventing the occurrence of PPR by treating ewes 2-3 weeks before they are to lamb and during lactation, but the anthelmintic used must also eliminate hypobiotic larvae. In addition, the animals must be given supplementary feeding during this period.
    Tropical Animal Health and Production 08/2006; 38(5):389-95. · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effectiveness of selective anthelmintic treatments and use of nematophagous fungi Duddingtonia flagrans in reducing levels of gastrointestinal nematodes in goats was investigated at Onderstepoort, South Africa. Nineteen (19) naturally infected indigenous male goats, aged 10 months, were separated into four groups and grazed in separate previously ungrazed paddocks for two worm seasons (February 2002-March 2003). Two groups of goats were fed D. flagrans chlamydospores daily and two groups did not receive fungi. The FAMACHA system was used to determine which goats required anthelmintic treatments. Twice as many goats in the no-fungi fed group required treatments as compared with the fungi fed group. Mean FAMACHA scores in the no-fungi fed group were higher during most of the sampling occasions compared to the group fed fungi, but the difference was not significant. The group-mean faecal egg counts and PCV% were comparable between the two treatment groups throughout the study. Haemonchus was the predominant parasite genus in composite group faecal cultures. Group-mean body weights and body condition scores were higher for the no-fungi fed group from May 2002 up to the end of the study, though statistical differences were not significant. Mean worm burdens indicated that the most abundant species infecting animals were Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus spp. and were higher in the fungi fed group. More animals required individual anthelmintic treatments in the no-fungi fed group. The requirement for extra treatments in the no-fungi fed group must, however, be considered against the financial cost of the fungi, the requirement of daily feeding of the fungi, the lower performance and higher worm burdens in the fungi fed group.
    Veterinary Parasitology 07/2006; 138(3-4):328-36. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A survey on the prevalence and intensity of infection with gastrointestinal helminths of Dorper sheep in relation to age and weather factors was carried out on a ranch in Kajiado district, a semi-arid area of Kenya for a period of 13 months (May 1999 to May 2000). Faecal samples from lambs (3 months to 1 year), yearlings (1-2 years) and adult breeding ewes (2-4 years) were examined for helminth egg output and helminth genus composition at 3-week intervals. The results indicated that the prevalence of strongyle and tapeworms infections were highest for lambs, followed by the adult breeding ewes and then for the yearlings. In all age groups the proportions of infected animals were higher during the wet season than in the dry season for both nematodes and tapeworms. The mean strongyle egg counts were higher during the dry season for lambs, but were higher during the wet season for the other age groups. Mixed strongyle infections were detected, with Trichostrongylus (55 %), Haemonchus (28 %), Cooperia (10.5 %) and Oesophagostomum (6.5 %) being the most frequently encountered genera throughout the study period. The trends in strongyle faecal egg counts indicated the occurrence of hypobiosis, with resumption of development towards the end of the dry season and at the onset of the short rains in October and November. Self-cure was also observed in September and November in all age groups, although less frequently in lactating ewes. The prevalence and intensities of infection with gastrointestinal helminths in this area appeared to be influenced by the age of the host and weather factors.
    The Onderstepoort journal of veterinary research 10/2004; 71(3):219-26. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A study was carried out on a ranch in the semi-arid area of Kajiado District in Kenya during the period July 2000 to June 2001 to determine the seasonal patterns of development and survival of gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep on pastures. A series of plots were contaminated with sheep faeces every month and pasture samples were collected weekly for the recovery and identification of larvae. The availability of infective larvae on naturally contaminated pastures was also monitored on the paddocks grazed by sheep and around the night pen and the watering point every month from July 2000 to June 2001. The results from the examination of the pasture samples indicated that rainfall distribution was the major factor governing the development and survival of the pre-parasitic stages. No parasitic larvae were detected from the plots contaminated during the dry months from July to October 2000, but development and translocation of infective larvae on pastures occurred on plots contaminated during the rainy seasons and soon after when relatively high moisture was present in the herbage (November 2000 to June 2001). During this period, peak larval counts occurred between the first and the second week post contamination, then declined to undetectable levels between week 4 and 16 post contamination. The lack of development of infective larvae during the dry season and the relatively rapid decline of their population during the wet season presents an opportunity for the use of pasture spelling as a means of helminth control in the study area. The availability of infective larvae on naturally contaminated pastures, around the night pen and around the watering point also followed the rainfall distribution pattern. Infective larvae were consistently recovered around the watering point throughout the study period. This indicated that the point is an important source of infection for sheep, especially during the dry season when other pastures are non-infective.
    Veterinary Research Communications 09/2004; 28(6):491-501. · 1.08 Impact Factor
  • R C Krecek, N Maingi
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    ABSTRACT: A laboratory trial to determine the efficacy of two methods in recovering known numbers of third-stage (L3) strongylid nematode larvae from herbage was carried out. Herbage samples consisting almost entirely of star grass (Cynodon aethiopicus) that had no L3 nematode parasitic larvae were collected at Onderstepoort, South Africa. Two hundred grams samples were placed in fibreglass fly gauze bags and seeded with third-stage strongylid nematode larvae at 11 different levels of herbage infectivity ranging from 50 to 8000 L3/kg. Eight replicates were prepared for each of the 11 levels of herbage infectivity. Four of these were processed using a modified automatic Speed Queen heavy-duty washing machine at a regular normal cycle, followed by isolation of larvae through centrifugation-flotation in saturated sugar solution. Larvae in the other four samples were recovered after soaking the herbage in water overnight and the larvae isolated with the Baermann technique of the washing. There was a strong correlation between the number of larvae recovered using both methods and the number of larvae in the seeded samples, indicating that the two methods give a good indication of changes in the numbers of larvae on pasture if applied in epidemiological studies. The washing machine method recovered higher numbers of larvae than the soaking and Baermann method at all levels of pasture seeding, probably because the machine washed the samples more thoroughly and a sugar centrifugation-flotation step was used. Larval suspensions obtained using the washing machine method were therefore cleaner and thus easier to examine under the microscope. In contrast, the soaking and Baermann method may be more suitable in field-work, especially in places where resources and equipment are scarce, as it is less costly in equipment and less labour intensive. Neither method recovered all the larvae from the seeded samples. The recovery rates for the washing machine method ranged from 18 to 41% while those for the soaking and Baermann method ranged from 0 to 27%. Practical application of the two methods to estimate the number of nematode larvae on pastures without applying a correction factor would therefore result in a significant underestimation. This study provides a model, which can be applied in various laboratories to determine the larval recovery rates for techniques being used and the application of a correction factor when estimating the actual numbers of larvae on pasture.
    Veterinary Parasitology 08/2004; 122(3):233-44. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An investigation on the occurrence of peri-parturient rise in trichostrongylid nematode egg output in breeding ewes was carried out on a Ranch in the semi-arid area of Kajiado District in Kenya during the period May 1999-April 2000. During the study, 20 ewes randomly selected from the breeding stock and 20 un-mated female yearlings were monitored for faecal strongyle egg output every 3 weeks. A significant peri-parturient rise in faecal egg output occurred at around the time of lambing and throughout the lactation period in the mated ewes, but not in the un-mated yearlings. The occurrence of peri-parturient rise in breeding ewes towards the end of the dry season and at the onset of the short rains was enhanced by the resumption of development of hypobiotic larvae. Self-cure occurred in the un-mated yearlings in September 1999 during the dry season and in November-December 1999 during the wet season, but was less obvious in the pregnant and lactating ewes. The peri-parturient ewes contributed to higher pasture contamination at a time when highly susceptible lambs were grazing alongside. Therefore, the control of gastrointestinal nematode parasites in ewes in this area should aim at reducing the effects of this phenomenon through treatment of ewes about 2-3 weeks to lambing and during lactation.
    Acta Tropica 01/2004; 92(3):213-8. · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pig production has increased significantly in the Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) region during the past decade, especially in rural, resource-poor, smallholder communities. Concurrent with the increase in smallholder pig keeping and pork consumption, there have been increasing reports of porcine cysticercosis in the ESA region. This article reviews the findings concerning the presence and impact of porcine cysticercosis in seven of the ESA countries. Most of the reported findings are based on surveys utilising lingual palpation and post-mortem examination, however, some also used serological assays. In Tanzania, community-based studies on porcine cysticercosis indicate a prevalence of 17.4% in the northern highlands district of Mbulu and a prevalence range of 5.1-16.9% in the southern highlands. In Kenya recent surveys in the southwestern part of the country where smallholder pig keeping is popular indicate that 10-14% of pigs are positive for cysticercosis by lingual examination. Uganda has the most pigs in Eastern Africa, most of which are kept under smallholder conditions. Preliminary surveys in 1998 and 1999 at slaughterhouses in Kampala indicated a prevalence of porcine cysticercosis between 0.12 and 1.2%, however, a rural survey in northern Uganda in 1999 indicated 34-45% of pigs slaughtered in selected villages were infected. Additionally, a new survey of 297 pigs slaughtered in Kampala in 2002 indicated that pigs from the central region of the country were negative for cysticercosis while 33.7% of the pigs coming from the rural Lira district in the north were positive. Interestingly 8 piglet foetuses removed from an infected slaughtered sow coming from Lira district were all found to harbour cysts of T. solium providing evidence of congenital transmission of porcine cysticercosis. In Mozambique, abattoir records indicate that porcine cysticercosis is present in all provinces of the country. A serological survey on pigs in rural Tete Province found 15% of pigs positive. In Zimbabwe, a retrospective study in official abattoirs around the country from 1994 to 2001 reported a mean prevalence of 0.34% which is in contrast to a post-mortem survey in 1999, which showed that the prevalence of porcine cysticercosis in rural west Zimbabwe where smallholder pig keeping is popular was 28.6%. In Zambia, abattoir records reported porcine cysticercosis in six of the nine provinces. Routine meat inspection of 1316 pigs at a slaughter slab in Lusaka showed that 20.6% of the pigs had cysticercosis whereas serological testing of 874 pigs at the same abattoir indicated that 56.6% were found to have circulating antigens of Taenia solium. Field surveys based on lingual palpation in Southern and Eastern Provinces of Zambia revealed prevalences of 8.2-28.4 and 5.2%, respectively. South Africa has the largest number of pigs in Southern Africa and cysticercosis has been recognised as a problem in the country for many decades. There is strong evidence supporting the high prevalence of neurocysticercosis infecting humans from resource-poor areas of the country where pigs are being raised under smallholder conditions. In spite of this community-based surveys on porcine cysticercosis have never been conducted in South Africa and the last slaughterhouse survey was conducted nearly 40 years ago. The prevalences of porcine cysticercosis found in these ESA countries rank among the highest in the world and the disease is emerging as an important constraint for the nutritional and economic well being of resource-poor smallholder farming communities. The current findings suggest the widespread presence of human tapeworm carriers and thus a high risk of human cysticercosis in both rural areas and urban centres in the ESA region. More research is required in the region to assess the extent and public health and economic impact of T. solium infection in order to determine whether and what prevention and control efforts are needed.
    Acta Tropica 07/2003; 87(1):13-23. · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A retrospective study covering a period of 10 years (1990-1999) was carried out using post mortem meat inspection records at the Veterinary Department Headquarters at Kabete to determine the prevalence and economic importance of bovine fasciolosis in Kenya. Meat inspection records from abattoirs in 38 districts distributed over seven out of the eight provinces of Kenya were examined. Prevalence of fasciolosis was calculated as the number of cattle found to be infected with Fasciola, expressed as a percentage of the total number of cattle slaughtered. Using the average weight and market price of a bovine liver, the monetary loss occasioned by condemnation of Fasciola infected livers was calculated. A survey was also carried out at Dagoretti slaughterhouse complex in Nairobi to determine the relative occurrence of F. gigantica and F. hepatica in slaughtered cattle. Cattle slaughtered at Dagoretti slaughterhouse originate from all parts of the country. A total of 5,421,188 cattle were slaughtered in the seven provinces of Kenya during the 10-year period and 427,931 (8%) of these cattle were infected with Fasciola. The region with the highest prevalence of fasciolosis was Western Province (16%) followed, in descending order, by Eastem Province (11%), Nyanza Province (9%), Rift Valley Province (8%), Central Province (6%), Nairobi Province (4%) and Coast Province (3.5%). The total economic loss incurred by the country during the 10-year period as a result of condemnation of the infected livers was approximately US$2.6 million. The total annual economic losses during this period ranged from approximately US$0.2-0.3 million. The highest total economic losses for the 10-year period were recorded in Western Province (US$0.8 million) and Central Province (US$0.7 million). A total of 1584 cattle originating from five provinces of Kenya were slaughtered at Dagoretti slaughterhouse over a period of two months of which 147 (9.3%) were infected with liver flukes. All the liver flukes obtained from the infected livers were identified as F. gigantica. It is concluded that fasciolosis is prevalent in cattle in all provinces of Kenya, that it causes great economic losses as a result of condemnation of infected livers, and that F. gigantica is the main species of liver flukes affecting cattle in Kenya. Local climatic factors, cattle trade, rustling and population numbers, and the presence of the snail intermediate hosts are probably the main factors influencing the incidence of the disease in the various regions of the country.
    The Onderstepoort journal of veterinary research 01/2003; 69(4):255-62. · 0.55 Impact Factor
  • N Maingi, W K Munyua, M N Gichigi
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    ABSTRACT: The strategic use of moxidectin or closantel in combination with levamisole (LEV) to control gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep in the highlands of central Kenya was examined. Thirty Corriedale female lambs aged between 6 and 8 months were assigned to three treatment groups of ten lambs each. The three groups of lambs were set stocked on separate paddocks for the entire study period of 12 months. Lambs in Group 1 were dewormed strategically with moxidectin at 0.2 mg/kg body weight and those in Group 2 with closantel at 10 mg/kg body weight together with LEV at 7.5 mg/kg body weight. These strategic treatments were given 3 weeks after the onset of both the short and long rains and at the end of the long rainy season. The third group of lambs remained untreated (control group). Nematode infections in the treated groups of lambs and larval infectivity for the pastures on which the lambs were grazing were well controlled compared with the untreated control group. This resulted in higher weight gains and packed cell volume (PCV) in the treated lambs compared with the untreated lambs. These parameters were comparable between the lambs treated with moxidectin and those treated with closantel plus LEV. The estimated monitory benefit per animal from the control of gastrointestinal nematodes using moxidectin or closantel in combination with LEV when compared with animals in the control group were US dollars 26 and 25, respectively. It was concluded that worm control strategies for sheep in the study area, which are based on anthelmintic treatments during the rainy seasons, are effective. Due to the extended period during which pastures remain infective in the high rainfall central highlands of Kenya, anthelmintics with sustained action such as moxidectin or closantel may be most effective. On farms where resistance to the commonly used benzimidazoles or LEV groups of anthelmintics has developed, moxidectin or closantel may be used in helminth control programs for sheep.
    Acta Tropica 12/2002; 84(2):93-100. · 2.79 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

276 Citations
520 Downloads
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51.29 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2012
    • Kenya Wildlife Service
      Nairoba, Nairobi Area, Kenya
  • 1991–2012
    • University of Nairobi
      • • Department of Veterinary Pathology & Microbiology
      • • Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
      Nairobi, Nairobi Province, Kenya
  • 2002–2004
    • University of Pretoria
      • • Department of Zoology and Entomology
      • • Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases
      Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa