Hiromi Takaki

Kyushu University, Fukuoka-shi, Fukuoka-ken, Japan

Are you Hiromi Takaki?

Claim your profile

Publications (13)77.86 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: As schizophrenia-like symptoms are produced by administration of phencyclidine (PCP), a noncompetitive antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, PCP-responsive genes could be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We injected PCP to Wistar rats and isolated five different parts of the brain in 1 and 4 hr after the injection. We analyzed the gene expression induced by the PCP treatment of these tissues using the AGILENT rat cDNA microarray system. We observed changes in expression level in 90 genes and 21 ESTs after the treatment. Out of the 10 genes showing >2-fold expressional change evaluated by qRT-PCR, we selected 7 genes as subjects for the locus-wide association study to identify susceptibility genes for schizophrenia in the Japanese population. In haplotype analysis, significant associations were detected in combinations of two SNPs of BTG2 (P = 1.4 × 10(-6) ), PDE4A (P = 1.4 × 10(-6) ), and PLAT (P = 1 × 10(-3) ), after false discovery rate (FDR) correction. Additionally, we not only successfully replicated the haplotype associations in PDE4A (P = 6.8 × 10(-12) ) and PLAT (P = 0.015), but also detected single-point associations of one SNP in PDE4A (P = 0.0068) and two SNPs in PLAT (P = 0.0260 and 0.0104) in another larger sample set consisting of 2,224 cases and 2,250 controls. These results indicate that PDE4A and PLAT may be susceptibility genes for schizophrenia in the Japanese population.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Neuropsychiatric Genetics 12/2011; 156B(7):850-8. · 3.23 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: It has been shown that transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) is critical in the generation of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)-inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs) from naïve CD4(+)T cells. However, in contrast to natural Tregs, TGF-beta1-induced iTregs rapidly lose both Foxp3 expression and suppression activity. We found that TGF-beta1-induced Foxp3 levels were maintained by the addition of the anti-interleukin 4 (IL-4) antibody or by STAT6 gene deletion. Thus, IL-4 is an important suppressor of Foxp3 induction, and T helper 2 development is a major cause for the disappearance of iTreg during long culture. Using promoter analysis in EL4 cells and primary T cells, we identified a silencer region containing a STAT6 binding site. STAT6 binding to this site reduced TGF-beta1-mediated Foxp3 promoter activation and chromatin modification. Retinoic acid has also been shown to suppress loss of Foxp3 induced by TGF-beta1. Retinoic acid in the presence of TGF-beta1 reduced STAT6 binding to the Foxp3 promoter and enhanced histone acetylation, thereby reverting the effect of IL-4. We propose that antagonistic agents for neutralizing IL-4 could be a novel strategy to facilitate inducible Treg cell generation and the promotion of tolerance in Th2-dominated diseases such as allergy.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 06/2008; 283(22):14955-62. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 02/2007; 353(4):1121. · 2.28 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: TGF-beta1 is a well-known immunosuppressive cytokine; however, little is known of the effect of TGF-beta1 on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). In this report, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of the suppressive effects of TGF-beta1 on APCs including dendritic cells and macrophages. Although TGF-beta1 did not greatly affect the activation of APCs, as assessed by the induction of IL-12 or the upregulation of CD40 in response to LPS, it strongly inhibited IFN-gamma-induced nitric oxide (NO) production from macrophages and dendritic cells. Using murine macrophage-like cell line RAW 264.7, we demonstrated that TGF-beta1 not only reduced the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) protein stability but also suppressed the iNOS gene transcription. We also found that TGF-beta1 directly inhibited IFN-gamma-induced STAT1 activation by reducing STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation. The IFN-gamma Type I receptor (IFNGR1) was found to be associated with the TGF-beta1 Type I receptor (TGF-betaRI) and was phosphorylated by the TGF-betaRI. Reduced activation of STAT1 by TGF-beta1 was abrogated by the mutation in the IFNGR1 in which the serine residues of potential sites of phosphorylation by TGF-betaRI were replaced by alanine residues. Thus, multiple mechanisms are present for the TGF-beta1-mediated reduction of iNOS production, and we propose a novel mechanism for regulating inflammatory cytokine by an anti-inflammatory cytokine, TGF-beta1; i.e. suppression of IFN-gamma-induced STAT1 activation by an association of the IFNGR1 with the TGF-betaRI.
    Genes to Cells 09/2006; 11(8):871-82. · 2.73 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role as a sensor of microbial pathogens in the innate immune response. TLRs transmit signals through the recruitment of adaptor proteins including tumor necrosis factor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), which mediates the activation of IkappaB kinase (IKK). TIFA (TRAF-interacting protein with a forkhead-associated (FHA) domain) has been shown to bind to TRAF6 and activate IKK by promoting the oligomerization and ubiquitin-ligase activity of TRAF6. FHA domains preferentially bind to phospho-threonine residues in their targets. Here, we identified a novel zinc finger protein, ZCCHC11, that interacts with TIFA from phosphoproteins of a macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, by using affinity purification with GST-TIFA and mass spectrometric analysis. By a search of the EST database, we found a 200kDa full-length form (ZCCHC11L). ZCCHC11L was mostly located to the nucleus, but translocated into the cytoplasm in response to LPS and bound to TIFA. Overexpression and knockdown by siRNA indicated that ZCCHC11 functions as a negative regulator of TLR-mediated NF-kappaB activation. The N-terminal region (ZCCHC11S) including C2H2-type [corrected] Zn-finger motif was sufficient for suppression of NF-kappaB. We propose that ZCCHC11 is a unique TLR signal regulator, which interacts with TIFA after LPS treatment and suppresses the TRAF6-dependent activation of NF-kappaB.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 07/2006; 344(3):1023-30. · 2.28 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Approximately 20% of human cancers are estimated to develop from chronic inflammation. Recently, the NF-kappaB pathway was shown to play an essential role in promoting inflammation-associated cancer, but the role of the JAK/STAT pathway, another important signaling pathway of proinflammatory cytokines, remains to be investigated. Suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) acts as an important physiological regulator of cytokine responses, and silencing of the SOCS1 gene by DNA methylation has been found in several human cancers. Here, we demonstrated that SOCS1-deficient mice (SOCS1-/- Tg mice), in which SOCS1 expression was restored in T and B cells on a SOCS1-/- background, spontaneously developed colorectal carcinomas carrying nuclear beta-catenin accumulation and p53 mutations at 6 months of age. However, interferon (IFN)gamma-/- SOCS1-/- mice and SOCS1-/- Tg mice treated with anti-IFNgamma antibody did not develop such tumors. STAT3 and NF-kappaB activation was evident in SOCS1-/- Tg mice, but these were not sufficient for tumor development because these are also activated in IFNgamma-/- SOCS1-/- mice. However, colons of SOCS1-/- Tg mice, but not IFNgamma-/- SOCS1-/- mice, showed hyperactivation of STAT1, which resulted in the induction of carcinogenesis-related enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. These data strongly suggest that SOCS1 is a unique antioncogene which prevents chronic inflammation-mediated carcinogenesis by regulation of the IFNgamma/STAT1 pathways.
    Journal of Experimental Medicine 07/2006; 203(6):1391-7. · 13.21 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A recent study has suggested that the methylation silencing of the suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3), a negative regulator of interleukin-6-related cytokines, could be involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the roles of SOCS3 in hepatocellular carcinogenesis and hepatitis have not been established. We investigated the effect of deleting the SOCS3 gene on the development of hepatitis and HCC in hepatitis C virus-infected patients and mouse models. The expression of SOCS genes in HCC and non-HCC regions of patient samples was determined by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. The conditional knockout approach in mice was used to determine the hepatocyte-specific roles of SOCS3. To generate a liver-specific deletion, floxed SOCS3 (SOCS3(fl/fl)) mice were crossed with albumin-Cre transgenic mice. Hepatitis and HCC were induced by administering concanavalin A and diethylnitrosamine, respectively. SOCS3 expression was reduced in the HCC regions compared with the non-HCC regions. Carcinogen-induced hepatic tumor development was enhanced by deletion of the SOCS3 gene, which was associated with higher levels of the targets of signal transducers and activators of transcription (ie, B-cell lymphoma-XL, B-cell lymphoma-2, C-myelocytomatosis, cyclin D1, and vascular endothelial growth factor). In the concanavalin A-mediated hepatitis model, deletion of the SOCS3 gene in the hepatocytes protected against liver injury through suppression of interferon-gamma signaling and induction of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-XL. Deletion of the SOCS3 gene in hepatocytes promotes the activation of STAT3, resistance to apoptosis, and an acceleration of proliferation, resulting in enhanced hepatitis-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.
    Gastroenterology 07/2006; 131(1):179-93. · 12.82 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)3 is a major negative feedback regulator of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3-activating cytokines. Transgenic mouse studies indicate that high levels of SOCS3 in T cells result in type 2 T helper cell (Th2) skewing and lead to hypersensitivity to allergic diseases. To define the physiological roles of SOCS3 in T cells, we generated T cell-specific SOCS3 conditional knockout mice. We found that the mice lacking SOCS3 in T cells showed reduced immune responses not only to ovalbumin-induced airway hyperresponsiveness but also to Leishmania major infection. In vitro, SOCS3-deficient CD4+ T cells produced more transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 and interleukin (IL)-10, but less IL-4 than control T cells, suggesting preferential Th3-like differentiation. We found that STAT3 positively regulates TGF-beta1 promoter activity depending on the potential STAT3 binding sites. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that more STAT3 was recruited to the TGF-beta1 promoter in SOCS3-deficient T cells than in control T cells. The activated STAT3 enhanced TGF-beta1 and IL-10 expression in T cells, whereas the dominant-negative form of STAT3 suppressed these. From these findings, we propose that SOCS3 regulates the production of the immunoregulatory cytokines TGF-beta1 and IL-10 through modulating STAT3 activation.
    Journal of Experimental Medicine 05/2006; 203(4):1021-31. · 13.21 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) is a potent negative regulator of various cytokines and it has been implicated in the regulation of immune responses. However, the role of SOCS1 in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) has not been clarified. To determine the role of SOCS1 in colitis, we generated SOCS1/T-cell receptor alpha (TCRalpha) double knockout (DKO) mice. The depletion of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) and IL-4 was achieved by crossing the DKO mice with IFNgamma knockout (KO) mice and by the administration of anti-IL-4 antibody, respectively. The activation of cytokine-induced transcription factors was determined by Western blotting with phosphorylation-specific antibodies, and the induction of inflammatory factors was measured by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Much more severe colitis developed in 100% of the DKO mice within 9 weeks of age than in TCRalpha-KO mice. Although the proportion and the activation status of CD4(+) TCRalpha(-)beta(+) T cells in DKO mice were similar to those in TCRalpha-KO mice, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1, nuclear factor kappaB, and their target genes were hyperactivated in infiltrated mononuclear cells and colonic epithelial cells in DKO mice. Cytokine-depletion experiments showed that exacerbated colitis in the DKO mice was dependent on both IFNgamma and IL-4. SOCS1-deficient cells were hypersensitive to IFNgamma, IL-4, and lipopolysaccharides, depending on the target genes. SOCS1 plays an important role in preventing murine colitis by restricting the cytokine signals. SOCS1/TCRalpha DKO mice could be a useful model for investigating human IBD.
    Gastroenterology 02/2006; 130(2):373-88. · 12.82 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates macrophages through toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Although the mechanism of the TLR signaling pathway has been well documented, the mechanism of the negative regulation in response to LPS, particularly LPS tolerance, is still poorly understood. In this study we identified and characterized a novel interferon- and LPS-inducible gene, FLN29, which contains a TRAF6-related zinc finger motif and TRAF family member-associated NF-kappaB activator-related sequences. The induction of FLN29 was dependent on STAT1. The forced expression of FLN29 in macrophage-like RAW cells resulted in the suppression of TLR-mediated NF-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, while a reduced expression of FLN29 by small interfering RNA partly cancelled the down-regulation of LPS signaling. Furthermore, we demonstrated that NF-kappaB activation induced by TRAF6 and TAB2 was impaired by co-expression of FLN29, suggesting FLN29 may regulate the downstream of TRAF6. Taken together, FLN29 is a new negative feedback regulator of TLR signaling.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 01/2006; 280(50):41289-97. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) has been suggested to function as a negative regulator of mitogen-stimulated proliferation and the Ras-p42/44 ERK (MAP kinase) pathway in a variety of cell types. However, the molecular basis of this suppression has not been clarified. Spred/Sprouty family proteins are also negative regulators of the ERK pathway by interacting with Raf-1. The Spred/Sprouty family proteins contain a cysteine-rich (CR) domain at the C-terminus, which is thought to be palmitoylated like Cav-1 and necessary for membrane anchoring. In this study, we demonstrated that Spred-1 localized in cholesterol-rich membrane raft/caveola fractions and interacted with Cav-1. To clarify the biological effect of Cav-1/Spred-1 interaction, we used hematopoietic cells that lacked expression of caveolins but expressed Spred-1. Forced expression of Cav-1 suppressed SCF- and IL-3-induced proliferation and ERK activation. Furthermore, forced expression of exogenous Spred-1 in Cav-1-expressing cells further suppressed proliferation and ERK activation. These data suggest that Spred-1 inhibits ERK activation in collaboration with Cav-1.
    Genes to Cells 10/2005; 10(9):887-95. · 2.73 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Immune and inflammatory systems are controlled by multiple cytokines, including interleukins (ILs) and interferons. Many of these cytokines exert their biological functions through Janus tyrosine kinases (JAKs) and STAT transcription factors. The CIS (cytokine-inducible SH2 protein) and SOCS (suppressors of cytokine signaling) are a family of intracellular proteins, several of which have emerged as key physiological regulators of cytokine-mediated homeostasis, including innate and adaptive immunity. We investigated the roles of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCSs) in regulating dendritic cell (DC) maturation and function. We showed that SOCS1-deficient DCs induced stronger Th1-type responses both in vitro and in vivo. SOCS1-deficient DCs induced higher interferon-γ (IFNγ) production from naive T cells than wild-type DCs in vitro. Lymph node T cells also produced higher amount of IFNγ when SOCS1-deficient bone marrow-derived (BM) DCs were transferred in vivo. Moreover, SOCS1−/− BMDCs raised more effective anti-tumor immunity than wild-type BMDCs. On the other hand, SOCS3-deficeint BMDCs expressed lower levels of MHC, co-stimulators and CD40 in response to LPS. SOCS3-deficient DCs induced lower T cell responses. Thus, SOCS1 and SOCS3 reciprocally regulate DC maturation.
    International Congress Series 01/2005; 1285:121-129.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The glutamatergic dysfunction has been implicated in pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The Group III metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGluR4), 6, 7, and 8 are thought to modulate glutamatergic transmission in the brain by inhibiting glutamate release at the synapse. We tested association of schizophrenia with GRM8 using 22 single nucleofide polymorphisms (SNPs) with the average intervals of 40.3 kb in the GRM8 region in 100 case-control pairs for the SNPs. Although we observed significant associations of schizophrenia with two SNPs, SNP18 (rs2237748, allele: P = 0.0279; genotype: P = 0.0124) and SNP19 (rs2299472, allele: P = 0.0302; genotype: P = 0.0127), none of two SNPs showed significant association with disease after Bonferroni correction. Both SNP18 and SNP19 were included in a large region (>330 kb) in which SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium (LD) at the 3' region of GRM8. We also tested haplotype association of schizophrenia with constructed haplotypes of the SNPs in LD. Significant associations were detected for the combinations of SNP5-SNP6 (chi(2) = 18.12, df = 3, P = 0.0004, P corr = 0.0924 with Bonferroni correction), SNP4-SNP5-SNP6 (chi(2) = 27.50, df = 7, P = 0.0075, P corr = 0.015 with Bonferroni correction), and SNP5-SNP6-SNP7 (chi(2) = 23.92, df = 7, P = 0.0011, P corr = 0.0022 with Bonferroni correction). Thus, we conclude that at least one susceptibility locus for schizophrenia is located within the GRM8 region in Japanese.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Neuropsychiatric Genetics 07/2004; 128B(1):6-14. · 3.23 Impact Factor