C G Wood

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, United States

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Publications (12)50.1 Total impact

  • Annals of Oncology 05/2011; 22(5):1243. · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) became a standard procedure in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in the immunotherapy era. Historically, median overall survival (OS) of patients treated with interferon alpha (IFN-α) without CN was 7.8 months. Median OS in patients treated with targeted therapy (TT) without CN is unknown. We retrospectively reviewed records of patients with mRCC who received TT without CN. Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression analysis were used to estimate median OS and identify poor prognostic factors. One hundred and eighty-eight patients were identified. Most patients had intermediate-risk (54.8%) or poor-risk (44.1%) disease. Median OS for all patients was 10.4 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.1-12.5]. By multivariable analysis, elevated baseline lactate dehydrogenase and corrected calcium, performance status of two or more, retroperitoneal nodal metastasis, thrombocytosis, current smoking, two or more metastatic sites, and lymphopenia were independent risk factors for inferior OS. Patients with four or more factors had increased risk of death (hazard ratio 8.83, 95% CI 5.02-15.5, P < 0.001) and 5.5-month median OS. Nineteen patients (10.0%) survived for 2+ years. These data highlight the improved OS of patients with mRCC treated with TT without CN, compared with historical IFN-α treatment, and may guide the design of trials investigating the role of CN in the TT era.
    Annals of Oncology 11/2010; 22(5):1048-53. · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The long-term prognosis for clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is dramatically altered by the development of metastatic recurrence. However, there are very few indicators that can predict which patient will develop a recurrence. MicroRNAs regulate many cellular processes and have been shown to be associated with cancer development and recurrence. More recently it has been shown that microRNA genes can be epigenetically modified in cancer, resulting in aberrant silencing of microRNA genes with tumor suppressor functions. In this study, we show that two genes encoding for hsa-miR-9 are significantly hypermethylated in ccRCC tumors compared with adjacent normal tissues (P-value <0.001 for both miR-9-1 and miR-9-3) resulting in decreased expression, and that the methylation of these genes was more significant in DNA obtained from the primary tumor for patients who developed a recurrence (P-value: 0.012 and 0.009 for miR-9-1 and miR-9-3, respectively) than in tumors from nonrecurrent patients. Furthermore, methylation of miR-9-3 was significantly associated with an increased risk of recurrence (hazard ratio: 5.85, 95% confidence intervals: 1.30-26.35) and high methylation levels of either miR-9-1 or miR-9-3 resulted in a significant, nearly 30-month decrease in recurrence-free survival time (P-value: 0.034 and 0.007 for miR-9-1 and miR-9-3, respectively). Our results demonstrate that hsa-miR-9 is involved in the development of ccRCC while also having a role in the development of metastatic recurrence.
    Oncogene 10/2010; 29(42):5724-8. · 8.56 Impact Factor
  • European Urology Supplements - EUR UROL SUPPL. 01/2010; 9(2):246-246.
  • Annals of Epidemiology - ANN EPIDEMIOL. 01/2008; 18(9):716-716.
  • Annals of Epidemiology - ANN EPIDEMIOL. 01/2008; 18(9):716-716.
  • Article: PD08.01
    Urology 01/2006; 68:28-28. · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Metastases from prostatic adenocarcinoma (prostate cancer) are characterized by their predilection for bone and typical osteoblastic features. An in vitro model of bone metastases from prostate cancer was developed using a bicompartment coculture system of mouse osteoblasts and human prostate cancer cells. In this model, the bone-derived prostate cancer cell lines MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b induced a specific and reproducible increase in osteoblast proliferation. Moreover, these cells were able to induce osteoblast differentiation, as assessed by increased alkaline phosphatase activity, Osteocalcin expression, and calcified matrix formation. This osteoblastic reaction was confirmed in vivo by intrafemoral injection of MDA PCa 2b cells into severe combined immunodeficiency disease mice. In contrast, the highly undifferentiated, bone-derived human prostate cancer cell line PC3 did not produce an osteoblastic reaction in vitro and induced osteolytic lesions in vivo. The osteoblast differentiation induced by MDA PCa 2b cells was associated with up-regulation of the osteoblast-specific transcriptor factor Cbfa1. Moreover, treatment of osteoblasts with conditioned medium obtained from MDA PCa 2b cells resulted in up-regulation of Cbfa1 and Osteocalcin expression. In support of the differentiation studies, a microarray analysis showed that primary mouse osteoblasts grown in the presence of MDA PCa 2b cells showed a shift in the pattern of gene expression with an increase in mRNA-encoding Procollagen type I and Osteopontin and a decrease in mRNA-encoding proteins associated with myoblast differentiation, namely myoglobin and myosin light-chain 2. Taken together, these findings suggest that the bone-derived prostate cancer cells MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b promote differentiation of osteoblast precursors to an osteoblastic phenotype through a Cbfa1-dependent pathway. These results also established that soluble factors produced by prostate cancer cells can induce expression of osteoblast-specific genes. This in vitro model provides a valuable system to isolate molecules secreted by prostate cancer cells that favor osteoblast differentiation. Moreover, it allows to screen for therapeutic agents blocking the osteoblast response to prostate cancer.
    Cancer Research 08/2001; 61(14):5652-9. · 8.65 Impact Factor
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    Prostate cancer and prostatic diseases 01/2001; 3(S1):S34. · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    Prostate cancer and prostatic diseases 12/1999; 2(S3):S27. · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CD66a (human homolog of rat cell-cell adhesion molecule, also known as biliary glycoprotein) is a cell surface protein of the immunoglobulin family. CD66a has been shown to mediate homotypic cell adhesion. Aside from this, no other functions of this molecule have been demonstrated. We have observed previously that CD66a protein expression is lost in most prostate tumors, suggesting that the down-regulation of CD66a is associated with the abnormal growth of prostate cells. CD66a is homologous (65% identity) to rat cell-cell adhesion molecule, which has been shown to have tumor-suppressive activity. This homology suggests the possibility that CD66a might also be a tumor suppressor. In this report, we show that restoring CD66a expression in DU145 human prostate cancer cells by adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene transfer dramatically altered the malignant phenotype of these cells, as evidenced by their reduced ability to form tumors in a xenograft animal model. This result suggests that loss of CD66a protein plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer, and that restoring CD66a expression might provide an effective treatment for prostate cancer. We further explored the possibility of using Ad vectors to deliver CD66a as a potential therapeutic agent for prostate cancer. Direct injection of Ad-CD66a, an Ad vector carrying the CD66a gene, into DU145 tumors in mice significantly suppressed the growth of these tumors. This antitumor activity of CD66a was found to be dose-dependent. These results suggest that CD66a has tumor-suppressive activity and that Ad-CD66a is a potential therapeutic agent for prostate cancer treatment.
    Cancer Gene Therapy 01/1999; 6(4):313-21. · 2.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: C-CAM1 is an epithelial adhesion molecule of immunoglobulin supergene family and has been implicated in the growth suppression of prostate cancer cells. Here we show that C-CAM1 can also suppress the tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells. These observations suggest that C-CAM1 may be a general growth suppressor in epithelial cells. In addition, we have identified the cytoplasmic domain, but not the extracellular adhesion domain, of C-CAM1 as critical for the growth suppression. Thus, the adhesion and the growth suppression functions of C-CAMI are independent of each other. Furthermore, mutation at the tyrosine phosphorylation site in the cytoplasmic domain of C-CAM1 did not obliterate C-CAM1's growth suppression function, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation is not involved in the signal transduction pathway leading to cell growth suppression. These studies provide the structural basis for future development of therapeutics that may selectively activate C-CAM1's growth suppression function.
    Oncogene 05/1997; 14(14):1697-704. · 8.56 Impact Factor