Fredrik Vult von Steyern

Lund University, Lund, Skåne, Sweden

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Publications (33)110.85 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The study was designed to investigate the influence of surrogate factors associated with sex (SH) and growth hormones (GH) on the risk of developing soft tissue sarcomas (STS).
    Cancer causes & control : CCC. 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background:Angiosarcomas may develop as primary tumours of unknown cause or as secondary tumours, most commonly following radiotherapy to the involved field. The different causative agents may be linked to alternate tumorigenesis, which led us to investigate the genetic profiles of morphologically indistinguishable primary and secondary angiosarcomas.Methods:Whole-genome (18k) c-DNA-mediated annealing, selection, extension and ligation analysis was used to genetically profile 26 primary and 29 secondary angiosarcomas. Key findings were thereafter validated using RT-qPCR, immunohistochemistry and validation of the gene signature to an external data set.Results:In total, 103 genes were significantly deregulated between primary and secondary angiosarcomas. Secondary angiosarcomas showed upregulation of MYC, KIT and RET and downregulation of CDKN2C. Functional annotation analysis identified multiple target genes in the receptor protein tyrosine kinase pathway. The results were validated using RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Further, the gene signature was applied to an external data set and, herein, distinguished primary from secondary angiosarcomas.Conclusions:Upregulation of MYC, KIT and RET and downregulation of CDKN2C characterise secondary angiosarcoma, which implies possibilities for diagnostic application and a mechanistic basis for therapeutic evaluation of RET-kinase-inhibitors in these highly aggressive tumours.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 1 July 2014; doi:10.1038/bjc.2014.359 www.bjcancer.com.
    British journal of cancer. 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Small (≤ 5 cm) soft tissue sarcomas (STS) of the extremities and the trunk wall generally have a favorable prognosis. However, 1 of 10 patients do develop metastases, and we therefore aimed to determine predictors of metastasis in a population-based cohort of patients with small STSs.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 06/2014; · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH) is a mesenchymal tumor that most often occurs in the skin (so-called dermatofibroma), but may also appear in soft tissues (so-called deep BFH) and in the skeleton (so-called non-ossifying fibroma). The origin of BFH is unknown, and it has been questioned whether it is a true neoplasm. Chromosome banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, RNA sequencing, RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR were used to search for recurrent somatic mutations in a series of BFH. BFHs were found to harbor recurrent fusions of genes encoding membrane-associated proteins (podoplanin, CD63 and LAMTOR1) with genes encoding protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms PRKCB and PRKCD. PKCs are serine-threonine kinases that through their many phosphorylation targets are implicated in a variety of cellular processes, as well as tumor development. When inactive, the amino-terminal, regulatory domain of PKCs suppresses the activity of their catalytic domain. Upon activation, which requires several steps, they typically translocate to cell membranes, where they interact with different signaling pathways. The detected PDPN-PRKCB, CD63-PRKCD and LAMTOR1-PRKCD gene fusions are all predicted to result in chimeric proteins consisting of the membrane-binding part of PDPN, CD63 or LAMTOR1 and the entire catalytic domain of the PKC. This novel pathogenetic mechanism should result in constitutive kinase activity at an ectopic location. The results show that BFH indeed is a true neoplasm, and that distorted PKC activity is essential for tumorigenesis. The findings also provide means to differentiate BFH from other skin and soft tissue tumors. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Rare cancers.
    The international journal of biochemistry & cell biology 04/2014; · 4.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pseudomyogenic hemangioendothelioma (PHE) is an intermediate malignant vascular soft tissue tumor primarily affecting children and young adults. The molecular basis of this neoplasm is unknown. We here used chromosome banding analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), mRNA sequencing, RT-PCR, and quantitative real-time PCR on a series of morphologically well-characterized PHEs to show that a balanced translocation t(7;19)(q22;q13), detected as the sole cytogenetic aberration in two cases, results in fusion of the SERPINE1 and FOSB genes. This translocation has not been observed in any other bone or soft tissue tumor. Interphase FISH on sections from eight additional PHEs identified the same SERPINE1-FOSB fusion in all cases. The role of SERPINE1, which is highly expressed in vascular cells, in this gene fusion is probably to provide a strong promoter for FOSB, which was found to be expressed at higher levels in PHEs than in other soft tissue tumors. FOSB encodes a transcription factor belonging to the FOS family of proteins, which together with members of the JUN family of transcription factors are major components of the Activating Protein 1 (AP-1) complex. Further studies are needed to understand the cellular impact of the aberrant expression of the FOSB gene, but as the t(7;19) resulting in the SERPINE1-FOSB fusion seems to be pathognomonic for PHE, FISH or RT-PCR could be useful for differential diagnostic purposes.
    The Journal of Pathology 12/2013; · 7.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gene amplification is a common phenomenon in malignant neoplasms of all types. One mechanism behind increased gene copy number is the formation of ring chromosomes. Such structures are mitotically unstable and during tumor progression they accumulate material from many different parts of the genome. Hence, their content varies considerably between and within tumors. Partly due to this extensive variation, the genetic content of many ring-containing tumors remains poorly characterized. Ring chromosomes are particularly prevalent in specific subtypes of sarcoma. Here, we have combined fluorescence in situ hybridization, global genomic copy number and gene expression data on ring-containing soft tissue sarcomas and show that they harbor two fundamentally different types of ring chromosome: MDM2-positive and MDM2-negative rings. While the former are often found in an otherwise normal chromosome complement, the latter seem to arise in the context of general chromosomal instability. In line with this, sarcomas with MDM2-negative rings commonly show complete loss of either CDKN2A or RB1-both known to be important for genome integrity. Sarcomas with MDM2-positive rings instead show co-amplification of a variety of potential driver oncogenes. More than one hundred different genes were found to be involved, many of which are known to induce cell growth, promote proliferation or inhibit apoptosis. Several of the amplified and overexpressed genes constitute potential drug targets.
    Human Molecular Genetics 09/2013; · 7.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Soft tissue tumors in children under one year of age (infants) are rare. The etiology is usually unknown, with external factors or congenital birth defects and hereditary syndromes being recognized in only a small proportion of the cases. We ascertained the cytogenetic findings in 16 infants from whom tumor tissue had been obtained during a 25-year period. In eight of them, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analyses could also be performed. No constitutional chromosome aberrations were detected, and assessment of clinical files did not reveal any congenital or later anatomical defects. Three tumors-one infantile fibrosarcoma, one embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, and one angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma (AFH)-had abnormal karyotypes. As the AFH had an exchange between chromosome arms 12p and 15q, additional fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses were performed, unexpectedly revealing an ETV6/NTRK3 fusion. Three of the eight tumors, including the AFH with an abnormal karyotype, analyzed by SNP array showed aberrations (loss of heterozygosity or imbalances). The present series suggests that the addition of array-based technologies is valuable for detecting underlying pathogenetic mechanisms.
    Cancer Genetics 08/2013; · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a mesenchymal neoplasm displaying variable morphologic and clinical features. To identify pathogenetically important genetic rearrangements, 44 SFTs were analyzed using a variety of techniques. Chromosome banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed recurrent breakpoints in 12q13, clustering near the NAB2 and STAT6 genes, and single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis disclosed frequent deletions affecting STAT6. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed high expression levels of the 5'-end of NAB2 and the 3'-end of STAT6, which at deep sequencing of enriched DNA corresponded to NAB2/STAT6 fusions. Subsequent reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) analysis identified a NAB2/STAT6 fusion in 37/41 cases, confirming that this fusion gene underlies the pathogenesis of SFT. The hypothesis that the NAB2/STAT6 fusions will result in altered properties of the transcriptional co-repressor NAB2 - a key regulator of the early growth response 1 (EGR1) transcription factor - was corroborated by global gene expression analysis; SFTs showed deregulated expression of EGR1 target genes, as well as of other, developmentally important genes. We also identified several nonrandom secondary changes, notably loss of material from 13q and 14q. As neither chromosome banding nor FISH analysis identify more than a minor fraction of the fusion-positive cases, and because multiple primer combinations are required to identify all possible fusion transcripts by RT-PCR, alternative diagnostic markers might instead be found among deregulated genes identified at global gene expression analysis. Indeed, using immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays, the top up-regulated gene, GRIA2, was found to be differentially expressed also at the protein level. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 06/2013; · 3.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoblastoma is a bone forming tumor with histological features highly similar to osteoid osteoma; the discrimination between the tumor types is based on size and growth pattern. The vast majority of osteoblastomas are benign but there is a group of so-called aggressive osteoblastomas that can be diagnostically challenging at the histopathological level. The genetic aberrations required for osteoblastoma development are not known and no genetic difference between conventional and aggressive osteoblastoma has been reported. In order to identify recurrent genomic aberrations of importance for tumor development we applied cytogenetic and/or SNP array analyses on nine conventional and two aggressive osteoblastomas. The conventional osteoblastomas showed few or no acquired genetic aberrations while the aggressive tumors displayed heavily rearranged genomes. In one of the aggressive osteoblastomas, three neighboring regions in chromosome band 22q12 were homozygously deleted. Hemizygous deletions of these regions were found in two additional cases, one aggressive and one conventional. In total, 10 genes were recurrently and homozygously lost in osteoblastoma. Four of them are functionally involved in regulating osteogenesis and/or tumorigenesis. MN1 and NF2 have previously been implicated in the development of leukemia and solid tumors, and ZNRF3 and KREMEN1 are inhibitors of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway. In line with deletions of the latter two genes, high beta-catenin protein expression has previously been reported in osteoblastoma and aberrations affecting the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway have been found in other bone lesions, including osteoma and osteosarcoma.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(11):e80725. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 12/2012; · 3.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The transcriptional enhancer region in intron 1 of the proto-oncogene MDM2 contains a polymorphic site (SNP309) that may harbor a G or a T nucleotide. Previous studies have shown that the G allele confers a higher affinity for the Sp1 transcription factor, resulting in an increased transcriptional activity of MDM2. A constitutional G allele has also been associated with earlier onset of various cancer types, and studies of sarcomas have shown an enrichment of the G allele in tumors with MDM2 amplification, notably atypical lipomatous tumor (also known as well-differentiated liposarcoma). In the present study, we analyzed the SNP309 genotype in blood samples and tumor tissue from 57 patients with bone or soft tissue tumors showing amplification of MDM2. We did not observe any constitutional enrichment of the G allele. More importantly, there was no preferential amplification of the G allele in tumor tissue from TG heterozygotes. The expression levels of MDM2 messenger RNA were not higher in tumors with amplification of the G allele than in tumors with amplification of the T allele. Thus, we could not find any evidence for a selective advantage of the SNP309 G allele in bone and soft tissue tumors with MDM2 amplification.
    Cancer Genetics 09/2012; 205(9):470-3. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Optimal treatment of soft-tissue sarcoma requires multidisciplinary management at a sarcoma center. However, these rare tumors are often misinterpreted as benign and many are inadequately treated outside a sarcoma center, with an increased risk of local recurrence that often requires further extensive surgical treatment. To improve referral and centralization of soft-tissue sarcoma management in the southern Sweden health care region, an open-access outpatient clinic at our sarcoma center and simple referral guidelines have been established for the past thirty years. The guidelines call for referral of all deep-seated soft-tissue tumors and of all ≥5-cm superficial tumors before open biopsy or surgery. We evaluated adherence to these guidelines and characterized referral patterns. We also studied the consequences of our strategy with regard to the relative numbers of benign and malignant diagnoses among referred patients. Adherence to guidelines, referral pathways, and time to referral to the sarcoma center were analyzed in a population-based series of 100 consecutive patients with soft-tissue sarcoma in the extremities or trunk wall. We also analyzed diagnosis and management of benign and malignant tumors in a second cohort consisting of 464 consecutive patients referred to the sarcoma center because of a soft-tissue tumor. Ninety-seven of the 100 patients with soft-tissue sarcoma were referred to the sarcoma center. All fifty-eight of the deep-seated soft-tissue sarcomas and twenty-eight of the forty-two superficial tumors were referred before open biopsy or surgery. Three-quarters of the patients with soft-tissue sarcoma first presented to a general practitioner. One-quarter of these patients were directly referred to the sarcoma center, which cut the referral time in half compared with patients initially referred to a local hospital. One-quarter of all patients referred to the outpatient clinic were diagnosed with a malignancy, with the majority of the malignancies being soft-tissue sarcoma. Our simple referral guidelines and open-access outpatient clinic resulted in nearly complete referral of patients with soft-tissue sarcoma to the sarcoma center. The "excess work" associated with referral of benign tumors according to our strategy was limited to the diagnosis of three benign tumors for each malignant tumor. We consider this surplus evaluation of benign tumors acceptable and probably necessary to achieve a high referral rate of soft-tissue sarcoma before initial surgery. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
    The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery 07/2012; 94(14):1291-6. · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ossifying fibromyxoid tumor (OFMT) is a soft tissue tumor of unknown lineage. Although most cases are histologically and clinically benign, some show malignant morphological features and local recurrences are not uncommon; a few may even metastasize. In the present study, cytogenetic analysis identified different structural rearrangements of chromosome band 6p21 in tumor cells from three cases of OFMT, including one with typical, one with atypical, and one with malignant morphological features. Mapping of the 6p21 breakpoint by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that the PHF1 gene was rearranged in all three cases. Further FISH, 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends, and RT-PCR analyses disclosed an EP400/PHF1 fusion transcript in one of the cases. Interphase FISH on tumor sections from 13 additional cases of OFMT showed rearrangement of the PHF1 locus in four of four typical, two of three atypical, and one of six malignant lesions. Thus, the PHF1 gene, previously shown to be the 3'-partner of fusion genes in endometrial stromal tumors, is also recurrently involved in the pathogenesis of OFMTs, irrespective of whether they are diagnosed as typical, atypical, or malignant lesions. The PHF1 protein interacts with the polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which, in turn, regulates the expression of a variety of developmental genes. Thus, the results indicate that deregulation of PRC2 target genes is crucial for OFMT development.
    American Journal Of Pathology 07/2012; 181(3):1069-77. · 4.60 Impact Factor
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    Emelie Styring, Anders Rydholm, Fredrik Vult von Steyern
    The surgeon: journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland 06/2012; 10(4):245-6. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Soft tissue angiofibroma is a recently delineated tumor type of unknown cellular origin. Cytogenetic analysis of four cases showed that they shared a t(5;8)(p15;q13). In three of them it was the sole change, underlining its pathogenetic significance. FISH mapping suggested the involvement of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) and nuclear receptor coactivator 2 (NCOA2) genes in 5p15 and 8q13, respectively. RT-PCR revealed in-frame AHRR/NCOA2 and NCOA2/AHHR transcripts in all four cases. Interphase FISH on paraffin-embedded tissue from 10 further cases without cytogenetic data showed that three were positive for fusion of AHRR and NCOA2. While AHRR has never been implicated in gene fusions before, NCOA2 is the 3'-partner in fusions with MYST3 and ETV6 in leukemias and with PAX3 and HEY1 in sarcomas. As in the previously described fusion proteins, NCOA2 contributes with its two activation domains to the AHRR/NCOA2 chimera, substituting for the repressor domain of AHRR. Because the amino terminal part of the transcription factor AHRR, responsible for the recognition of xenobiotic response elements in target genes and for heterodimerization, shows extensive homology with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), the fusion is predicted to upregulate the AHR/ARNT signaling pathway. Indeed, global gene expression analysis showed upregulation of CYP1A1 as well as other typical target genes of this pathway, such as those encoding toll-like receptors. Apart from providing a diagnostic marker for soft tissue angiofibroma, the results also suggest that this tumor constitutes an interesting model for evaluating the cellular effects of AHR signaling.
    Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 05/2012; 51(5):510-20. · 3.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Secondary angiosarcoma of the breast is a rare but severe long-term complication of breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy. We characterized a population-based cohort of patients with secondary angiosarcomas from two tertiary hospitals to investigate this complication with respect to surgical treatment and outcome. We identified 35 patients with a history of radiation for breast cancer that developed angiosarcoma in the irradiated field from 1990 to 2009. Of these, 31 underwent surgery and were included for analysis. Angiosarcoma developed after median 7 years (range 3-25 years). R0 resection was obtained in 23 of 31 patients after primary treatment. Local recurrence developed in 19 patients after median 6 months (range 1-89 months). Regional and distant metastases occurred in 13 patients after median 17 months (range 2-50 months); nine which also had local recurrence. Patients whose local recurrence could be operated on had a better survival after treatment than those who were not considered for surgical treatment, median 34 months (range 6-84 months) compared with 6 months (range 5-24 months). The median disease-free survival and disease-specific survival was 16 and 37 months, respectively. Despite R0 resection, two-thirds of the patients developed a local recurrence. Survival among those with local recurrence was better if the patient could be treated with surgery. Overall, the prognosis was dismal and median DSS was just over 3 years.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 03/2012; 19(8):2700-6. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The humerus is the second most common long-bone site of metastatic bone disease. We report complications, risk factors for failure, and survival of a large series of patients operated on for skeletal metastases of the humerus. This study was based on 208 patients treated surgically for 214 metastatic lesions of the humerus. Reconstructions were achieved by intramedullary nails in 148, endoprostheses in 35, plate fixation in 21, and by other methods in 10. The median age at surgery was 67 years (range, 29-87 years). Breast cancer was the primary tumor in 31%. The overall failure rate of the surgical reconstructions was 9%. The reoperation rate was 7% in the proximal humerus, 8% in the diaphysis, and 33% in the distal part of the bone. Among 36 operations involving an endoprosthesis, 2 were failures (6%) compared with 18 of 178 osteosynthetic devices (10%). In the osteosynthesis group, intramedullary nails failed in 7% and plate fixation failed in 22%. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that prostate cancer was associated with an increased risk of failure after surgery (hazard ratio, 7; P < 0.033). The cumulative survival after surgery was 40% (95% confidence interval [CI] 34-47) at 1 year, 21% (95% CI, 15-26) at 2 years, and 16% (95% CI, 12-19) at 3 years. Our method of choice is the cemented hemiprosthesis for pathologic proximal humeral fractures and interlocked intramedullary nail for lesions in the diaphysis. Pathologic fractures in the distal humerus are uncommon and associated with a very high reoperation rate.
    Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.] 10/2011; 21(8):1049-55. · 1.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Morphologic evaluation of samples from fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle (CN) biopsies is an important part of the pretreatment diagnosis of bone and soft tissue tumors. Because most such tumors have characteristic, sometimes even specific, chromosomal rearrangements, ancillary genetic analyses could provide important diagnostic information. Whereas directed analyses, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization or reverse transcriptase−polymerase chain reaction, for specific genetic aberrations are well suited for the relatively small cell numbers obtained with FNA biopsies, the possibility to obtain tumor karyotypes after cell culturing has been less well studied. In the present study, karyotypes from 114 FNA biopsy samples were compared to those in corresponding surgical tumor samples; in addition, results on 31 CN samples and their corresponding tumor samples were available. Of the 138 surgical tumor samples, 88 (64%) showed clonal acquired chromosome aberrations, 42 (30%) displayed a normal karyotype, and 8 (6%) did not yield any karyotype as a result of infection or poor cell growth. The corresponding figures for the 114 FNA samples were 27 (24%), 28 (25%), and 59 (52%), and for the 31 CN samples 15 (48%), 10 (32%), and 6 (19%). The relatively low success rate, with the possible exception of primitive round cell/Ewing sarcomas (abnormal karyotype in 6 of 11 FNA samples), strongly indicates that it is not meaningful to attempt cell culturing and chromosome banding analysis on FNA biopsy sample cells in patients with suspected bone or soft tissue tumors. The use of ancillary techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridization might improve the diagnostic value from FNA. Our preliminary data suggest that if a pretreatment karyotype is wanted, the cytogenetic analysis should be made on cells from CN samples, close to half of which showed an aberrant karyotype.
    Cancer Genetics 04/2011; 204(4):203-6. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pseudomyogenic hemangioendothelioma is a recently described morphologic entity among soft tissue tumors. It is more common in young individuals, shows a male predominance, is often multifocal and involves different tissue planes, and shows a high propensity for local recurrence. To our knowledge, no genetic characteristics of this tumor type have been presented before. Here, we describe the finding of a balanced t(7;19)(q22;q13) as the sole anomaly in three lesions from a 14-year-old girl. By means of fluorescence in situ hybridization, the breakpoints could be delineated, but reverse transcriptase−polymerase chain reaction for putative fusion genes did not reveal any fusion transcript. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization on sections from nine other pseudomyogenic hemangioendotheliomas indicated the presence of an unbalanced der(7)t(7;19) in one of them. Thus, the translocation between chromosomes 7 and 19 seems to be a recurrent phenomenon and is likely to be of pathogenetic significance in at least a subset of pseudomyogenic hemangioendotheliomas.
    Cancer Genetics 04/2011; 204(4):211-5. · 1.92 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

274 Citations
110.85 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2014
    • Lund University
      • • Department of Orthopaedics
      • • Department of Clinical Genetics
      • • Department of Pathology
      Lund, Skåne, Sweden
  • 2010–2013
    • Skåne University Hospital
      Malmö, Skåne, Sweden
  • 2006–2011
    • Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro
      Bari, Apulia, Italy
  • 2009
    • Oslo University Hospital
      • Department of Medical Genetics
      Oslo, Oslo, Norway