Serguei V Vinogradov

University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, United States

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Publications (58)271.84 Total impact

  • Xin Wei, Thulani H Senanayake, Anna Bohling, Serguei V Vinogradov
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    ABSTRACT: Curcumin (CUR) is a unique natural compound with promising anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the therapeutic efficacy of curcumin was challenged in clinical trials, mostly due to its low bioavailability, rapid metabolism and elimination. We designed a nanodrug form of curcumin, which makes it stable and substantially enhances cellular permeability and anticancer activity at standard oral administration. Curcumin was conjugated as an ester to cholesteryl-hyaluronic acid (CHA) nanogel that is capable for targeted delivery to CD44-expressing drug-resistant cancer cells. CHA-CUR nanogels demonstrated excellent solubility and sustained drug release in physiological conditions. It induced apoptosis in cancer cells, suppressing the expression of NF-κB, TNF-α, and COX-2 cellular targets similar to free curcumin. PK/PD studies also revealed improved circulation parameters of CHA-CUR at oral, i.p. and i.v. administration routes. CHA-CUR showed targeted tumor accumulation and effective tumor growth inhibition in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and aggressive orthotropic murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 animal models. CHA-CUR treatment was well-tolerated and resulted in up to 13-fold tumor suppression, making this nanodrug a potential candidate for cancer prevention and therapeutic treatment.
    Molecular Pharmaceutics 07/2014; · 4.57 Impact Factor
  • Serguei Vinogradov, Galya Warren, Xin Wei
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form approximately 50% of tumor mass. TAMs were shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing immunocompetent cells, inducing neovascularization and supporting cancer stem cells. TAMs retain mobility in tumor mass, which can potentially be employed for better intratumoral biodistribution of nanocarriers and effective tumor growth inhibition. Due to the importance of TAMs, they are increasingly becoming principal targets of novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we compare features of macrophages and TAMs that are essential for TAM-directed therapies, and illustrate the advantages of nanomedicine that are related to the preferential capture of nanocarriers by Mϕ in the process of drug delivery. We discuss recent efforts in reprogramming or inhibiting tumor-protecting properties of TAMs, and potential strategies to increase efficacy of conventional chemotherapy by combining with macrophage-associated delivery of nanodrugs.
    Nanomedicine 04/2014; 9(5):695-707. · 5.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Current cancer chemotherapy is gradually shifting to the application of drug combinations that prevent development of drug resistance. Many anticancer drugs have poor solubility and limited oral bioavailability. Using an innovative approach, we developed dual-drug nanoformulations of a polymeric nanogel conjugate with anticancer 5-FU nucleoside analog, floxuridine (FLOX), and the second anticancer drugs, paclitaxel (PCL), or a geldanamycin analog, 17-AAG, for combination therapy. PCL or 17-AAG had been encapsulated in the cholesteryl-polyvinyl alcohol-floxuridine nanogel (CPVA-FLOX) by simple solution mixing and sonication. Dual nanodrugs formed particles with diameter 180 nm and either drug content (5-20%) that were stable and could be administered orally. Their cytotoxicity in human and mouse cancer cells was determined by MTT assay, and cellular target inhibition - by Western blot analysis. Tumor growth inhibition was evaluated using an orthotopic mouse mammary 4T1 cancer model. CPVA-FLOX was more potent than free drug in cancer models including drug-resistant ones; while dual nanodrugs demonstrated a significant synergy (CPVA-FLOX/PCL), or showed no significant synergy (CPVA-FLOX/17-AAG) compared to free drugs (PCL or 17-AAG). Dual nanodrug CPVA-FLOX/17-AAG effect on its cellular target (HSP70) was similar to 17-AAG alone. In animal model, however, both dual nanodrugs effectively inhibited tumor growth compared to CPVA-FLOX after oral administration. Oral dual-drug nanoformulations of poorly-soluble drugs proved to be a highly efficient combination anticancer therapy in preclinical studies.
    Pharmaceutical Research 01/2014; · 4.74 Impact Factor
  • Serguei V Vinogradov, Thulani Senanayake
    Nanomedicine 08/2013; 8(8):1229-32. · 5.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Antiviral therapy using nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) is neurotoxic and has low efficiency in eradication of HIV-1 harbored in central nervous system (CNS). Previously, we reported that active 5'-triphosphates of NRTIs encapsulated in cationic nanogels (nano-NRTIs) suppress HIV-1 activity more efficiently than NRTIs and exhibit reduced mitochondrial toxicity(1,2). Here, we demonstrated low neurotoxicity and excellent antiviral activity of nano-NRTIs decorated with the peptide (AP) binding brain-specific apolipoprotein E receptor. Nano-NRTIs induced lower levels of apoptosis and formation of reactive oxygen species, a major cause of neuron death, than free NRTIs. Optimization of size, surface decoration with AP significantly increased brain accumulation of nano-NRTIs. The efficient CNS delivery of nano-NRTIs resulted in up to 10-fold suppression of retroviral activity and reduced virus-associated inflammation in humanized mouse model of HIV-1 infection in the brain. Our data provide proof of the advanced efficacy of nano-NRTIs as safer alternative of current antiviral drugs.
    Nanomedicine: nanotechnology, biology, and medicine 07/2013; · 6.93 Impact Factor
  • Xin Wei, Thulani H Senanayake, Galya Warren, Serguei V Vinogradov
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    ABSTRACT: Many drug-resistant tumors and cancer stem cells (CSC) express elevated levels of CD44 receptor, a cellular glycoprotein binding hyaluronic acid (HA). Here, we report the synthesis of nanogel-drug conjugates based on membranotropic cholesteryl-HA (CHA) for efficient targeting and suppression of drug-resistant tumors. These conjugates significantly increased the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs with previously reported activity against CSC, such as etoposide, salinomycin, and curcumin. The small nanogel particles (diameter 20-40 nm) with a hydrophobic core and high drug loads (up to 20%) formed after ultrasonication and demonstrated a sustained drug release following the hydrolysis of biodegradable ester linkage. Importantly, CHA-drug nanogels demonstrated 2-7 times higher cytotoxicity in CD44-expressing drug-resistant human breast and pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells compared to that of free drugs and nonmodified HA-drug conjugates. These nanogels were efficiently internalized via CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis and simultaneous interaction with the cancer cell membrane. Anchoring by cholesterol moieties in the cellular membrane after nanogel unfolding evidently caused more efficient drug accumulation in cancer cells compared to that in nonmodified HA-drug conjugates. CHA-drug nanogels were able to penetrate multicellular cancer spheroids and displayed a higher cytotoxic effect in the system modeling tumor environment than both free drugs and HA-drug conjugates. In conclusion, the proposed design of nanogel-drug conjugates allowed us to significantly enhance drug bioavailability, cancer cell targeting, and the treatment efficacy against drug-resistant cancer cells and multicellular spheroids.
    Bioconjugate Chemistry 04/2013; · 4.58 Impact Factor
  • Thulani H Senanayake, Galya Warren, Xin Wei, Serguei V Vinogradov
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    ABSTRACT: A majority of nanoencapsulated drugs that have shown promise in cancer chemotherapy are administered intravenously. Development of effective oral nanoformulations presents a very challenging medical goal. Here, we describe successful applications of innovative polymeric nanogels in the form of conjugates with activated nucleoside analogs for oral administration in cancer chemotherapy. Previously, we reported the synthesis of amphiphilic polyvinyl alcohol and dextrin-based nanogel conjugates with the phosphorylated 5-FU nucleoside Floxuridine and demonstrated their enhanced activity against regular and drug-resistant cancers[1]. In this study, we synthesized and evaluated oral applications of nanogel conjugates of a protected Gemcitabine, the drug never used in oral therapies. These conjugates were able to quickly release an active form of the drug (Gemcitabine 5'-mono-, di- and triphosphates) by specific enzymatic activities, or slowly during hydrolysis. Gemcitabine conjugates demonstrated up to 127 times higher in vitro efficacy than the free drug against various cancer cells, including the lines resistant to nucleoside analogs. Surprisingly, these nanogel-drug conjugates were relatively stable in gastric conditions and able to actively penetrate through the gastrointestinal barrier based on permeability studies in Caco-2 cell model. In tumor xenograft models of several drug-resistant human cancers, we observed an efficient inhibition of tumor growth and extended the life-span of the animals by 4 times that of the control with orally treated Gemcitabine- or Floxuridine-nanogel conjugates. Thus, we have demonstrated a potential of therapeutic nanogel conjugates with the activated and stabilized Gemcitabine as a successful oral drug form against Gemcitabine-resistant and other drug-resistant tumors.
    Journal of Controlled Release 02/2013; · 7.63 Impact Factor
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    Serguei Vinogradov, Xin Wei
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    ABSTRACT: Properties of the small group of cancer cells called tumor-initiating or cancer stem cells (CSCs) involved in drug resistance, metastasis and relapse of cancers can significantly affect tumor therapy. Importantly, tumor drug resistance seems to be closely related to many intrinsic or acquired properties of CSCs, such as quiescence, specific morphology, DNA repair ability and overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, drug efflux transporters and detoxifying enzymes. The specific microenvironment (niche) and hypoxic stability provide additional protection against anticancer therapy for CSCs. Thus, CSC-focused therapy is destined to form the core of any effective anticancer strategy. Nanomedicine has great potential in the development of CSC-targeting drugs, controlled drug delivery and release, and the design of novel gene-specific drugs and diagnostic modalities. This review is focused on tumor drug resistance-related properties of CSCs and describes current nanomedicine approaches, which could form the basis of novel combination therapies for eliminating metastatic and CSCs.
    Nanomedicine 04/2012; 7(4):597-615. · 5.26 Impact Factor
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    Thulani H Senanayake, Galya Warren, Serguei V Vinogradov
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    ABSTRACT: Inherent or therapy-induced drug resistance is a major clinical setback in cancer treatment. The extensive usage of cytotoxic nucleobases and nucleoside analogues in chemotherapy also results in the development of specific mechanisms of drug resistance, such as nucleoside transport or activation deficiencies. These drugs are prodrugs; and being converted into the active mono-, di-, and triphosphates inside cancer cells following administration, they affect nucleic acid synthesis, nucleotide metabolism, or sensitivity to apoptosis. Previously, we actively promoted the idea that the nanodelivery of active nucleotide species, e.g., 5'-triphosphates of nucleoside analogues, can enhance drug efficacy and reduce nonspecific toxicity. In this study, we report the development of a novel type of drug nanoformulations, polymeric conjugates of nucleoside analogues, which are capable of the efficient transport and sustained release of phosphorylated drugs. These drug conjugates have been synthesized, starting from cholesterol-modified mucoadhesive polyvinyl alcohol or biodegradable dextrin, by covalent attachment of nucleoside analogues through a tetraphosphate linker. Association of cholesterol moieties in aqueous media resulted in intramolecular polymer folding and the formation of small nanogel particles containing 0.5 mmol/g of a 5'-phosphorylated nucleoside analogue, e.g., 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (floxuridine, FdU), an active metabolite of anticancer drug 5-fluorouracyl (5-FU). The polymeric conjugates demonstrated rapid enzymatic release of floxuridine 5'-phosphate and much slower drug release under hydrolytic conditions (pH 1.0-7.4). Among the panel of cancer cell lines, all studied polymeric FdU-conjugates demonstrated an up to 50× increased cytotoxicity in human prostate cancer PC-3, breast cancer MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231 cells, and more than 100× higher efficacy against cytarabine-resistant human T-lymphoma (CEM/araC/8) and gemcitabine-resistant follicular lymphoma (RL7/G) cells as compared to free drugs. In the initial in vivo screening, both PC-3 and RL7/G subcutaneous tumor xenograft models showed enhanced sensitivity to sustained drug release from polymeric FdU-conjugate after peritumoral injections and significant tumor growth inhibition. All these data demonstrate a remarkable clinical potential of novel polymeric conjugates of phosphorylated nucleoside analogues, especially as new therapeutic agents against drug-resistant tumors.
    Bioconjugate Chemistry 08/2011; 22(10):1983-93. · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The blood-brain barrier (BBB) presents a tremendous challenge for the delivery of drugs to the central nervous system (CNS). This includes drugs that target brain receptors for the treatment of obesity and anorexia. Strategic drug delivery to brain (SDDB) is an approach that considers in depth the relations among the BBB, the candidate therapeutic, the CNS target, and the disease state to be treated. Here, we illustrate principles of SDDB with two different approaches to developing drugs based on leptin. In normal body weight humans and in non-obese rodents, leptin is readily transported across the BBB and into the CNS where it inhibits feeding and enhances thermogenesis. However, in obesity, the transport of leptin across the BBB is impaired, resulting in a resistance to leptin. As a result, it is difficult to treat obesity with leptin or its analogs that depend on the leptin transporter for access to the CNS. To treat obesity, we developed a leptin agonist modified by the addition of pluronic block copolymers (P85-leptin). P85-leptin retains biological activity and is capable of crossing the BBB by a mechanism that is not dependent on the leptin transporter. As such, P85-leptin is able to cross the BBB of obese mice at a rate similar to that of native leptin in lean mice. To treat anorexia, we developed a leptin antagonist modified by pegylation (PEG-MLA) that acts primarily by blocking the BBB transporter for endogenous, circulating leptin. This prevents blood-borne, endogenous leptin from entering the CNS, essentially mimicking the leptin resistance seen in obesity, and resulting in a significant increase in adiposity. These examples illustrate two strategies in which an understanding of the interactions among the BBB, CNS targets, and candidate therapeutics under physiologic and diseased conditions can be used to develop drugs effective for the treatment of brain disease.
    Physiology & Behavior 06/2011; 105(1):145-9. · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To enhance transfection efficacy of pDNA through the application of multifunctional peptide-PEG-tris-acridine conjugates (pPAC) and the formation of biodegradable core-shell polyplexes for gene delivery to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). pPAC-mediated transfection was compositionally optimized in mouse BBB cells (bEnd.3). Cellular uptake and trafficking, and brain accumulation of pDNA was evaluated by fluorescent imaging and histochemistry. We constructed anti-MRP4 siRNA-producing vectors and evaluated the efficacy of MRP4 down-regulation of MRP4 by Western blot and qPCR, and its effect on the uptake of (3)H-AZT, an MRP4 substrate. A core-shell gene delivery system (GDS) was assembled from pDNA and pPAC, carrying multifunctional peptides with NLS, TAT, and brain-specific BH, or ApoE sequences, and biodegradable pLPEI polyamine. This GDS demonstrated better cellular and nuclear accumulation, and a 25-fold higher transfection efficacy in slow-dividing bEnd.3 cells compared to ExGen500. Inclusion of brain-targeting pPAC enhanced in vivo accumulation of functional pDNA in brain capillaries. Treatment by encapsulated anti-MRP4 siRNA-producing pDNA caused transient down-regulation of MRP4, and, after intravenous injection in Balb/c mice, enhanced AZT uptake in the brain by 230-270%. The pPAC represent novel efficient components of GDS that could find various gene therapy applications, including genetic modulation of the BBB.
    Pharmaceutical Research 12/2010; 27(12):2528-43. · 4.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Polymer-siRNA complexes (siRNA polyplexes) are being actively developed to improve the therapeutic application of siRNA. A major limitation for many siRNA polyplexes, however, is insufficient mRNA suppression. Given that modifying the sense strand of siRNA with 3' cholesterol (chol-siRNA) increases the activity of free nuclease-resistant siRNA in vitro and in vivo, we hypothesized that complexation of chol-siRNA can increase mRNA suppression by siRNA polyplexes. In this study, the characteristics and siRNA activity of self assembled polyplexes formed with chol-siRNA or unmodified siRNA were compared using three types of conventional, positively charged polymers: (i) biodegradable, cross-linked nanogels (BDNG) (ii) graft copolymers (PEI-PEG), and (iii) linear block copolymers (PLL10-PEG, and PLL50-PEG). Chol-siRNA did not alter complex formation or the resistance of polyplexes to siRNA displacement by heparin but increased nuclease protection by BDNG, PLL10-PEG, and PLL50-PEG polyplexes over polyplexes with unmodified siRNA. Chol-CYPB siRNA increased suppression of native CYPB mRNA in mammary microvascular endothelial cells (MVEC) by BDNG polyplexes (35%) and PLL10-PEG polyplexes (69%) over comparable CYPB siRNA polyplexes but had no effect on PEI-PEG or PLL50-PEG polyplexes. Overall, these results indicate that complexation of chol-siRNA increases nuclease protection and mRNA suppression by select siRNA polyplexes. These results also suggest that polycationic block length is an important factor in increasing mRNA suppression by PLL-PEG chol-siRNA polyplexes in mammary MVEC.
    Biomaterials 11/2010; 32(5):1404-11. · 8.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: One of the major problems in cancer chemotherapy is the fast development of drug resistance to most anticancer therapeutics. Thus, an important cause of the eventual decline in clinical efficacy of cytotoxic nucleoside analogs was the selection of resistant cancer cells with deficiencies in the expression of nucleoside transporters or nucleoside-activating kinases. Here, we present an efficient strategy of overcoming this type of drug resistance by tumor-specific delivery of nanogel-encapsulated active triphosphates of nucleoside analogs (NATP). The small particles of biodegradable cationic nanogels loaded with anionic NATP efficiently interacted with cancer cells and released active drug compounds into the cytoplasm. The potential of novel drug formulations was evaluated in the nucleoside transport-deficient (CEM/araC/C8) or nucleoside activation-deficient (RL7/G) lymphogenic cancer cells. Compared to nucleoside analogs, NATP-loaded nanogels demonstrated increased cytotoxicity, reducing the drug resistance index 250- to 900-fold in CEM/araC/C8 cells and 70- to 100-fold in RL7/G cells. The strong cytotoxic effect of nanoformulations was accompanied by characteristic cell cycle perturbations, usually observed in drug-treated sensitive cells, and resulted in the induction of apoptosis in all studied drug-resistant cells. Efficient cellular accumulation of nanogels and the consequent increase in intracellular levels of NATP were found to be the major factors determining cytotoxic efficacy of nanoformulations. Decoration of nanogels with multiple molecules of tumor lymphatic-specific peptide (LyP1) enhanced the binding efficacy of nanocarriers with lymphogenic cancer cells. The targeted nanoformulation of activated gemcitabine (LyP1-NG-dFdCTP), when injected in subcutaneous RL7/G xenograft tumor model, demonstrated 2-fold more efficient tumor growth inhibition than gemcitabine at a higher dose. Nanogel-drug formulations exhibited no systemic toxicity during the treatment, hence extending the versatility of nucleoside analogs in the treatment of drug-resistant lymphogenic tumors.
    International Journal of Pharmaceutics 08/2010; 395(1-2):281-9. · 3.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Overexpressing superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1; also called Cu/ZnSOD), an intracellular superoxide (O(2)(*-))-scavenging enzyme, in central neurons inhibits angiotensin II (AngII) intraneuronal signaling and normalizes cardiovascular dysfunction in diseases associated with enhanced AngII signaling in the brain, including hypertension and heart failure. However, the blood-brain barrier and neuronal cell membranes impose a tremendous impediment for the delivery of SOD1 to central neurons, which hinders the potential therapeutic impact of SOD1 treatment on these diseases. To address this, we developed conjugates of SOD1 with poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer (Pluronic) (SOD1-P85 and SOD1-L81), which retained significant SOD1 enzymatic activity. The modified SOD1 effectively scavenged xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine-derived O(2)(*-), as determined by HPLC and the measurement of 2-hydroxyethidium. Using catecholaminergic neurons, we observed an increase in neuronal uptake of SOD1-Pluronic after 1, 6, or 24h, compared to neurons treated with pure SOD1 or PEG-SOD1. Importantly, without inducing neuronal toxicity, SOD1-Pluronic conjugates significantly inhibited AngII-induced increases in intraneuronal O(2)(*-) levels. These data indicate that SOD1-Pluronic conjugates penetrate neuronal cell membranes, which results in elevated intracellular levels of functional SOD1. Pluronic conjugation may be a new delivery system for SOD1 into central neurons and therapeutically beneficial for AngII-related cardiovascular diseases.
    Free Radical Biology and Medicine 08/2010; 49(4):548-58. · 5.27 Impact Factor
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    Hongwei Zhang, Serguei V Vinogradov
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    ABSTRACT: With the goal of rational design of systemic gene delivery system and efficient transfection of capillary endothelial cells forming the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we synthesized several short polyamines with reducible disulfide backbones for pDNA packaging, internalization and consequent release from endosomal compartments. The synthetic cationic polymers prepared from short linear PEI (pLPEI), triethylenetetramine (pTETA), and spermine (pSPE), demonstrated very low toxicity, good condensation capacity, and high levels of pDNA protection, producing small particulate nanoformulations. Mild reduction of the disulfide backbone allowed complete release of pDNA from these polyplexes. In vitro transfection of murine brain capillary endothelial bEnd.3 cells with pSPE, pTETA, and pLPEI polyplexes was 2.3-4.9 times more effective compared with the non-degradable LPEI 22kDa reagent (ExGen500) in the presence of serum. Their transfection ability was noticeably decreased following inhibition of the cellular reduced glutathione (GSH). After cellular uptake of biodegradable polyplexes, a disperse distribution of labeled pDNA in the cytoplasm of transfected cells was observed in contrast to ExGen500. Based on these polyamines, novel multifunctional polyplexes have been developed for efficient nuclear delivery of pDNA by co-application of NLS peptide and PEG-modified intercalating conjugates. Significant increase of nuclear accumulation was observed, and the transfection of bEnd.3 cells was additionally enhanced nearly 2-fold, demonstrating 8.5-, 6.3- and 3.7-fold better levels for pLPEI, pTETA, and pSPE, respectively, compared to ExGen500. Following brain-specific targeting, these safe and effective polyplexes may be converted into systemic nanocarriers for gene delivery and transfection of the BBB.
    Journal of Controlled Release 05/2010; 143(3):359-66. · 7.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Leptin is a peptide hormone produced primarily by adipose tissue that acts as a major regulator of food intake and energy homeostasis. Impaired transport of leptin across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) contributes to leptin resistance, which is a cause of obesity. Leptin as a candidate for the treatment of this obesity is limited because of the short half-life in circulation and the decreased BBB transport that arises in obesity. Chemical modification of polypeptides with amphiphilic poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymers (Pluronic) is a promising technology to improve efficiency of delivery of polypeptides to the brain. In the present study, we determined the effects of Pluronic P85 (P85) with intermediate hydrophilic-lipophilic balance conjugated with leptin via a degradable SS bond [leptin(ss)-P85] on food intake, clearance, stability, and BBB uptake. The leptin(ss)-P85 exhibited biological activity when injected intracerebroventricularly after overnight food deprivation and 125I-leptin(ss)-P85 was stable in blood, with a half-time clearance of 32.3 min (versus 5.46 min for leptin). 125I-Leptin(ss)-P85 crossed the BBB [blood-to-brain unidirectional influx rate (K(i)) = 0.272 +/- 0.037 microl/g x min] by a nonsaturable mechanism unrelated to the leptin transporter. Capillary depletion showed that most of the 125I-leptin(ss)-P85 taken up by the brain reached the brain parenchyma. Food intake was reduced when 3 mg of leptin(ss)-P85 was administered via tail vein in normal body weight mice [0-30 min, p < 0.0005; 0-2 h, p < 0.001]. These studies show that the structure based Pluronic modification of leptin increased metabolic stability, reduced food intake, and allowed BBB penetration by a mechanism-independent BBB leptin transporter.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 04/2010; 333(1):253-63. · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    Serguei V Vinogradov
    Nanomedicine 02/2010; 5(2):165-8. · 5.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Macrophages serve as a depot for HIV type-1 (HIV-1) in the central nervous system. To efficiently target macrophages, we developed nanocarriers for potential brain delivery of activated nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) called nano-NRTIs. Nanogel carriers consisting of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)- or Pluronic-polyethylenimine (PEI) biodegradable networks, star PEG-PEI or poly(amidoamine) dendrimer-PEI-PEG dendritic networks, as well as nanogels decorated with brain-targeting peptide molecules, specifically binding to the apolipoprotein E receptor, were synthesized and evaluated. Nano-NRTIs were obtained by mixing aqueous solutions of zidovudine 5'-triphosphate or didanosine 5'-triphosphate and nanocarriers, followed by freeze-drying. Intracellular accumulation, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of nano-NRTIs were monitored in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). HIV-1 viral activity in infected MDMs was measured by a reverse transcriptase activity assay following treatment with nano-NRTIs. Mitochondrial DNA depletion in MDMs and human HepG2 cells was assessed by quantitative PCR. Nanogels were efficiently captured by MDMs and demonstrated low cytotoxicity, and no antiviral activity without drugs. All nano-NRTIs demonstrated high efficacy of HIV-1 inhibition at drug levels as low as 1 μmol/l, representing a 4.9- to 14-fold decrease in 90% effective drug concentrations as compared with NRTIs, whereas 50% cytotoxicity effects started at 200× higher concentrations. Nano-NRTIs with a core-shell structure and decorated with brain-targeting peptides displayed the highest antiviral efficacy. Mitochondrial DNA depletion, a major cause of NRTI neurotoxicity, was reduced threefold compared with NRTIs at application of selected nano-NRTIs. Nano-NRTIs demonstrated a promising antiviral efficacy against HIV-1 in MDMs and showed strong potential as nanocarriers for delivery of antiviral drugs to macrophages harbouring in the brain.
    Antiviral chemistry & chemotherapy 01/2010; 21(1):1-14.
  • Antiviral Research - ANTIVIR RES. 01/2010; 86(1).
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    Alexander V Kabanov, Serguei V Vinogradov
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    ABSTRACT: Nanogels are swollen nanosized networks composed of hydrophilic or amphiphilic polymer chains. They are developed as carriers for the transport of drugs, and can be designed to spontaneously incorporate biologically active molecules through formation of salt bonds, hydrogen bonds, or hydrophobic interactions. Polyelectrolyte nanogels can readily incorporate oppositely charged low-molecular-mass drugs and biomacromolecules such as oligo- and polynucleotides (siRNA, DNA) as well as proteins. The guest molecules interact electrostatically with the ionic polymer chains of the gel and become bound within the finite nanogel. Multiple chemical functionalities can be employed in the nanogels to introduce imaging labels and to allow targeted drug delivery. The latter can be achieved, for example, with degradable or cleavable cross-links. Recent studies suggest that nanogels have a very promising future in biomedical applications.
    Angewandte Chemie International Edition 07/2009; 48(30):5418-29. · 11.34 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
271.84 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004–2013
    • University of Nebraska Medical Center
      • • College of Pharmacy
      • • Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
      Omaha, NE, United States
  • 1998–2012
    • University of Nebraska at Omaha
      • • College of Pharmacy
      • • Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
      Omaha, NE, United States
  • 2011
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Division of General Internal Medicine
      Seattle, WA, United States
  • 2005–2010
    • The Nebraska Medical Center
      Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • 2000
    • Supratek Pharma Inc.
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 1999
    • Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary
      • Schepens Eye Research Institute
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 1996
    • Lomonosov Moscow State University
      • Faculty of Chemistry
      Moscow, Moscow, Russia