A Pomeranz

Tel Aviv University, Tell Afif, Tel Aviv, Israel

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Publications (68)224.33 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To compare the effects of a single nocturnal dose of 3 honey products (eucalyptus honey, citrus honey, or labiatae honey) to placebo (silan date extract) on nocturnal cough and difficulty sleeping associated with childhood upper respiratory tract infections (URIs). A survey was administered to parents on 2 consecutive days, first on the day of presentation, when no medication had been given the previous evening, and the following day, when the study preparation was given before bedtime, based on a double-blind randomization plan. Participants included 300 children aged 1 to 5 years with URIs, nocturnal cough, and illness duration of ≤ 7 days from 6 general pediatric community clinics. Eligible children received a single dose of 10 g of eucalyptus honey, citrus honey, labiatae honey, or placebo administered 30 minutes before bedtime. Main outcome measures were cough frequency, cough severity, bothersome nature of cough, and child and parent sleep quality. In all 3 honey products and the placebo group, there was a significant improvement from the night before treatment to the night of treatment. However, the improvement was greater in the honey groups for all the Parents rated the honey products higher than the silan date extract for symptomatic relief of their children's nocturnal cough and sleep difficulty due to URI. Honey may be a preferable treatment for cough and sleep difficulty associated with childhood URI.
    PEDIATRICS 08/2012; 130(3):465-71. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Subcutaneous fat necrosis (SCFN) of the newborn is an uncommon dermatologic disorder characterized by firm, palpable subcutaneous nodules or plaques with or without erythema. Despite its benign course, SCFN may become complicated by extracutaneous manifestations. Hypercalcemia is considered a rare complication, but it is potentially fatal if unrecognized. During the last several years therapeutic hypothermia (TH) became an essential new therapeutic modality for severe neonatal asphyxia. We report a neonate who presented with SCFN and hypercalcemia following hypothermia therapy for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and provide a review of the contemporary literature on the topic. We believe that this is important since the use of TH is rapidly increasing, and therefore, the possible side effects including SCFN and hypercalcemia may also become more prevalent. This prompts the need for awareness by treating physicians for this complication.
    Journal of pediatric endocrinology & metabolism: JPEM 11/2010; 23(11):1185-8. · 0.75 Impact Factor
  • Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology 09/2005; 26(4):409 - 409. · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Renal injuries caused by blunt abdominal trauma are common in children. Serious renal trauma is associated with insult to other organs, whereas isolated renal injuries are usually minor. We present the cases of six male children (aged 7-17 years) with major isolated renal injuries due to minimal blunt trauma to the upper adbomen and/or the flank, out of a total of 21 children admitted with renal trauma in a 5-years period. On physical examination all patients had a painful, tender abdomen and/or flank with ipsilateral bruises and ecchymosis. Hematuria, either macro ( n=4) or micro ( n=2), was found in all. The injuries were left-sided in five and were of a variable severity (grade III: n=2; grade IV: n=3; grade V: n=1 according to the kidney injury scale of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma). Four children underwent nephrectomy. This small series underlines that major kidney insult can occur after a minimal blunt trauma localized to the flank or upper abdomen. Abdominal CT should be performed when clinical or laboratory findings or the mechanism of trauma suggest renal injury.
    Emergency Radiology 03/2004; 10(4):190-2.
  • Ze'ev Korzets, Avishalom Pomeranz
    Journal of Pediatrics 03/2004; 144(2):286-7; author reply 287. · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in preterm neonates ranges between 4 and 25%. The need for a radiologic investigation has not yet been established in very low birth weight premature newborns (<1500 g birth weight). For an 11-year period (1990 to 2001), medical records of 62 very low birth weight premature infants admitted to a Level III neonatal intensive care unit and who developed UTI were reviewed retrospectively. Results of renal ultrasound and voiding cystourethrograms were compared between extremely low birth weight infants (birth weight, <1000 g) (Group A, Patient 34) and premature infants with birth weight between 1001 and 1500 g (Group B, Patient 28). UTI was more common in Group A (12.2%) than in Group B (5.7%) infants. Renal ultrasound detected mild renal pelvic dilatation (unilateral or bilateral) in 9 infants in Group A (26%) and in 1 infant in Group B (3.5%). Voiding cystourethrograms were performed in 26 of 34 (76%) infants in Group A and in 17 of the 28 (61%) premature infants in Group B. Vesicourethral reflux (VUR) was observed in 6 infants, 2 in group A (7.7%) and 4 in Group B (23%). We found that the rate of VUR was lower in very low birth weight premature newborns than that reported in the medical literature among term newborns who developed UTI. VUR was less frequent in extremely low birth weight infants who developed UTI than in infants weighing 1001 to 1500 g.
    The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 06/2003; 22(5):426-30. · 3.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe a female neonate in whom a urinoma was first diagnosed at 20 weeks of gestation without any evidence of underlying urinary tract obstruction. The urinoma became apparent following the performance of a "bloody tap" amniocentesis. Sequential ultrasonography, both fetal and up to 3 months after birth, showed eventual resorption of the urinoma in parallel with the development of a shrunken, non-functioning kidney. Except for the onset of high-renin hypertension, which spontaneously remitted at 1 year of age, the baby's postnatal course was uneventful. Renal function was normal. The presence of a fetal urinoma as a sign of a dysplastic kidney is discussed.
    Pediatric Nephrology 02/2003; 18(1):65-7. · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have shown that endothelial dysfunction after 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 Nx) in rats is associated with decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and increased vascular superoxide production. Blood pressure is significantly increased by day 10 after surgery. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a key cofactor of NO synthase. Suboptimal levels of BH4 result in uncoupling of NO synthase, low NO synthesis and augmented production of superoxide anions. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether BH4 supplementation may improve NO production and prevent the increase of blood pressure after 5/6 Nx. Three groups were evaluated: 5/6 Nx (untreated rats), BH4 (5/6 Nx rats treated with BH4, 10 mg/day i.p. for 10 days) and L-ARG (5/6 Nx rats treated with L-arginine, 260 mg/kg BW, p.o for 10 days). Systolic blood pressure (SBP), urinary nitrate excretion (UNO(3)) and creatinine clearance (CCR) were measured before surgery and on days 3 and 10 after surgery. Endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) protein content of mesenteric resistance vessels was measured at the end of the study. SBP increased from 107 +/- 2 to 127 +/- 4 mm Hg in untreated 5/6 Nx rats (p < 0.01). By contrast, rats treated with BH4 or L-ARG remained normotensive. Ten days after 5/6 Nx, creatinine clearance decreased similarly in all groups. Both BH4 and L-ARG supplementation markedly increased UNO(3) excretion. The mesenteric vascular expression of eNOs protein was significantly higher in BH4 but not in L-ARG, compared with Nx rats. BH4 supplementation prevents the earlier increase in blood pressure observed in rats after 5/6 Nx, possibly by upregulating eNOS in resistance vessels.
    Nephron Physiology 01/2003; 94(1):p6-9. · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was performed in 29 children, ages 8.5-10.5 years (mean 11.6+/-3.0) with isolated haematuria (IH) and in 27 age, sex, weight and height matched healthy controls (C). Isolated haematuria was defined as >or=5 RBC/HPF on three separate urinalyses over a 3-month period with normal renal function, a normal appearing ultrasound examination of the kidneys and the absence of hypercalciuria. Haematuria had been documented for at least 3 years prior to ABPM. Daytime and nighttime periods were 0800-2200 and 2200-0800 hours, respectively. The total number of successful blood pressure readings was 21.8 and 20.7 per subject (90.0 and 86.1% of all attempted measurements) in IH and C, respectively. Mean 24-h, daytime and nighttime heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in IH did not differ from that of controls. Nocturnal dipping was present in all IH patients and was of equal magnitude to C (9.5 vs 8.4 and 13.7 vs 10.3% for average systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) dips, respectively). We conclude that normal blood pressure values, as well as the circadian rhythm of blood pressure, are maintained in children with IH of at least 3 years' duration.
    Pediatric Nephrology 11/2002; 17(11):938-42. · 2.94 Impact Factor
  • Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 08/2002; 17(7):1351-3. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The inflammatory process in torticollis involves the cervical muscles, nerves, and/or the vertebral synovia causing painful and abnormal head position. Most cases of acute acquired non-traumatic torticollis are of benign etiology, but some patients may suffer from a serious disease requiring thorough investigation and hospitalization. To describe the epidemiology, clinical features and the etiology of acute acquired non-traumatic torticollis in our center. A retrospective chart review of 45 hospitalized children in the Sapir Medical Center over a 10 year period. We studied 45 children; 23 girls and 22 boys. Their mean age was 6 years (range 6 months to 16 years). All patients reported marked neck pain as their main complaint. Local infection was the most frequent etiology, and 33 (73%) patients were hospitalized during the fall-winter season. Twenty six patients underwent x-ray imaging, and of these, ten (38%) had pathology. The main findings were some degree of atlanto-axial subluxation, and widening of the prevertebral space. Treatment included analgesic and antibiotics for suspected bacterial infections. Two patients required surgical drainage. Cervical neck traction was performed on 15 patients. Mean admission time was 4.1 days and was shorter in the pediatric department compared to the ENT and orthopedic departments. Careful clinical and radiological evaluation for the wide spectrum of clinical entities should be done. Local infections of the respiratory tract are the most common etiology. Conservative treatment usually leads to complete resolution in a short time.
    Harefuah 07/2002; 141(6):519-21, 579.
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    ABSTRACT: In a previous study, we found that increased sodium concentrations in the drinking water led to an increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in fourth- and fifth-grade school children. Milk powder formulae have a low content of sodium, almost identical to that of breast milk. However, the final sodium concentration in the milk formula depends upon the concentration of sodium in the diluting water, which varies remarkably. To evaluate changes in blood pressure during the first 2 months of life in neonates receiving low-sodium mineral water (LSMW), high-sodium tap water (HSTW), or breast milk. A randomized, prospective study in a teaching hospital. Fifty-eight Jewish term infants maintained on milk formula were randomly assigned to two groups. Group 1 consisted of 25 infants whose formula was diluted with LSMW (Eden Spring Mineral Water) having a sodium concentration of 32 mg/l (1.4 mmol/l). Group 2 contained 33 infants whose formula was diluted with HSTW having a sodium concentration of 196 mg/l (8.5 mmol/l). Fifteen breastfed babies served as the control group (group 3). Weekly weight, height, head circumference, heart rate, and systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean (MAP) blood pressures were recorded for each infant for 8 consecutive weeks after birth. After 8 weeks, group 1 reverted to a diet similar to that of group 2. At 6 months of age (week 24), a follow-up blood pressure measurement was performed in 11, 20 and seven infants in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Blood pressure was measured during sleep. Urinary sodium : creatinine ratio was determined monthly during the initial 2 months. Increases in weight and height were equal in all groups. Heart rate did not differ between groups during the entire study period. From the age of 6 weeks until week 8, MAP, SBP and DBP were found to be significantly greater in the group 2 (HSTW). In parallel, the urinary sodium : creatinine ratio was significantly greater in this group. At week 24, blood pressure values in group 1 increased towards those of group 2. Diluting milk formula with tap water containing a high concentration of sodium will result in the infant being fed a high-salt diet. To equilibrate with breast milk, formula should be diluted with low-salt water. Blood pressure in the neonate is increased by a high sodium intake via drinking water.
    Journal of Hypertension 03/2002; 20(2):203-7. · 3.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 4-year-old Jewish boy presented with dysuria, urinary dribbling, increased urinary frequency, and new onset of diurnal enuresis. An infiltrating solid mass involving the entire bladder wall was found. Biopsy revealed "tumor-forming" eosinophilic cystitis, a rare bladder lesion of unclear cause. Antitoxocariasis treatment was unsuccessful. High-dose corticosteroids failed. The child's clinical condition and bladder sonographic findings continued to deteriorate. Treatment with cyclosporin A was given for 8 months, with a complete clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic cure and no side effects. Two years of follow-up showed a complete recovery.
    PEDIATRICS 01/2002; 108(6):E113. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: In experimental animals, a reduction in renal mass leads to glomerulosclerosis of the residual parenchyma and eventual renal failure. In humans, however, data on the influence of nephrectomy or agenesis on future functional parameters and hypertension are as yet controversial. Objective: To evaluate blood-pressure patterns in children with a solitary kidney as a result of either unilateral renal agenesis (URA) or uninephrectomy (UNX) and correlate them to the increase in size of the remaining kidney. Methods: Twenty-eight children with a solitary kidney were divided into two groups: the URA group, with 18 subjects (13 male and five female, with a mean age of 9.6 ± 3.9 years), and the UNX group, which contained 10 subjects (four male and six female, with a mean age of 14.0 ± 2.7 years). The mean time since nephrectomy was 8.7 years. Each study group was assigned an age-, weight- and height-matched control group. In all subjects, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was performed using the SpaceLabs model no. 90207. Daytime and night-time were defined as 0800-2200 h and 2200-0800 h, respectively. Urinalysis, serum creatinine and urea results were recorded for all the study group participants. The size of the remaining kidney was determined by ultrasound examination. The percentage increase in kidney size, as calculated from standard kidney-length-against-age nomograms was correlated to the percentage deviation from normal blood pressure values. Results: The mean 24 h, daytime and night-time systolic blood pressure (SBP) readings were significantly higher in children in the URA group than in those in the corresponding control group (111.4 ± 7.5 mmHg versus 106.9 ± 6.7 mmHg, P  < 0.004; 115.2 ± 3.1 mmHg versus 110.7 ± 3.4 mmHg, P  < 0.004; and 105.2 ± 2.6 mmHg versus 101.2 ± 1.8 mmHg, P  < 0.002, respectively). Daytime heart rate was found to be significantly reduced (84.4 ± 5.2 versus 87.8 ± 8.2 beats/min, P  < 0.04). In the UNX group, 24 h mean, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), as well as heart rate, did not differ from control values. Daytime systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher than those of the controls (119.8 ± 4.0 mmHg versus 115.5 ± 3.8 mmHg, P  < 0.02; and 72.7 ± 4.0 mmHg versus 70.0 ± 11.0 mmHg, P  < 0.02, respectively). Nocturnal dipping was present in all groups and was of equal magnitude in the corresponding control groups. The mean 24 h diastolic blood pressure load was significantly greater in URA patients than in controls (19.6 versus 10.8%, respectively, P  < 0.01). In the UNX group, the blood pressure loads were similar to those of controls. The percentage increase in length of the remaining kidney was found to correlate positively with the percentage delta increase in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions: Compared with the age-, height- and weight-matched controls, the children with a solitary kidney caused by URA had an elevated mean 24 h SBP. In contrast, those with UNX had mean 24 h blood pressure values similar to those of their controls. A rise in SBP was, however, seen in both groups during the daytime hours. Thus, the presence of a solitary kidney, for whatever reason, may be pathogenetically linked to a raised blood pressure, and this linkage may be more pronounced in URA. The delta increase in size of the remaining kidney may serve as a prognostic indicator of blood pressure elevation.
    Blood Pressure Monitoring 09/2001; 6(5):263-267. · 1.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated by means of a bioassay the efficacy of 4 different antibiotics administered in a prophylactic dose to children with vesicoureteral reflux. A total of 159 urine samples from 53 children taking prophylactic antibiotics with proved vesicoureteral reflux were tested. The children were divided into 4 groups according to the antibiotic given, which included nalidixic acid, cephalexin, cotrimoxazole and cefixime. Urine samples were collected in the morning, at noon and in the evening, and each sample was bioassayed for growth inhibition of a standard Escherichia coli. The urine volume used was specifically determined for each antibiotic, and growth inhibition by this specific volume was equivalent to that produced by standard diffusion disks. In addition, the specific gravity, which reflected urinary concentration of each sample, was measured. Mean patient age plus or minus standard deviation of the 4 groups was 53 +/- 41 for nalidixic acid, 23 +/- 34 for cephalexin, 55 +/- 35 for cotrimoxazole and 47 +/- 35 months for cefixime, respectively. In children less than 2 years old specific gravity was higher in the morning (1.021 +/- 0.0006 versus 1.0008 +/- 0.0004 at 8 a.m. and 2 p. m., respectively, p <0.05). In contrast, in children older than 4 years the specific gravity was higher in the afternoon and evening hours (1.019 +/- 0.003 versus 1.007 +/- 0.003 at 2 p.m. and 8 a.m., respectively, p <0.05). The percentage of patients who demonstrated growth inhibition in all 3 samples of the test day was 7%, 6%, 69% and 44% for nalidixic acid, cephalexin, cotrimoxazole and cefixime, respectively (p <0.001 for cotrimoxazole and cefixime versus nalidixic acid and cephalexin. Divided into morning, noon and evening, the percentage of samples that demonstrated growth inhibition was 85.7%, 21.4% and 7.1% for nalidixic acid, 37.5%, 12. 5% and 6.3% for cephalexin, 100%, 92.3% and 76.9% for cotrimoxazole and 100%, 77.7% and 55.5% for cefixime, respectively. A direct correlation was found between specific gravity and growth inhibition (r = 0.55, p <0.001). Urine concentration during the day is dependent on age with older children having more concentrated urine in the latter part of the day. Growth inhibition is enhanced by concentrated urine. Compared to nalidixic acid and cephalexin, cotrimoxazole and cefixime produce a sustained bactericidal effect for about 60% of a 24-hour day due to the longer half-life.
    The Journal of Urology 10/2000; 164(3 Pt 2):1070-3. · 3.70 Impact Factor
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    B Wolach, R Gavrieli, A Pomeranz
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    ABSTRACT: Although there are many studies on the effect of granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factors (G/GM-CSF) on adult neutrophil functions, there is little information regarding their influence on neonatal cells. We studied the in vitro effect of G/GM-CSF on neutrophil chemotaxis, polarization, and superoxide anion generation in 47 neonates compared with 35 adults. We found that G-CSF and GM-CSF significantly enhanced the chemotaxis of newborn infants' neutrophils, normalizing their chemotactic defect [from 35 +/- 7 cells/field (mean +/- SE) to 49 +/- 5 cells/field with G-CSF, p < 0.05 and to 55 +/- 4 cells/field with GM-CSF, p < 0.001]. It is notable that the maximal neutrophil response to the cytokines was observed particularly in the newborn infants with severe impairment in their chemotactic activity. Statistical analysis of the data showed a significant inverse correlation, which supported this observation (r = -0.6, p < 0.02 for G-CSF; r = -0.76, p < 0.001 for GM-CSF). The reduced polarization of neonatal compared with adult cells [71 +/- 5% versus 86 +/- 2% (mean +/- SE), p < 0.05], was corrected by CSF-priming (to 87 +/- 4% with G-CSF and to 92 +/- 2% with GM-CSF, p < 0.05). In addition, the neutrophil superoxide generation was significantly improved in both groups following the CSF-priming. GM-CSF and G-CSF gave comparable results in all functions studied except that GM-CSF improved superoxide release to a greater extent. This study shows a significant improvement of the neonatal neutrophil functions following in vitro CSF-priming and contributes to a better understanding of the neonatal neutrophil behavior when treated with G/GM-CSF.
    Pediatric Research 09/2000; 48(3):369-73. · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the effects of the changes in fetal renal pelvis dilatation on post-natal diagnosis and outcome. Prenatal sonographic fetal renal anteroposterior diameters of > or = 4 mm in the second trimester, which persisted to > or = 7 mm in the third trimester, were the inclusion criteria. Fifty-six fetuses and 73 renal units with normal karotypes and a solitary sonographic finding of renal pyelectasis, which met the inclusion criteria, were followed, post-natally, until the age of 30 months. The neonates were categorized into three groups, according to their final diagnosis: No hydronephrosis, pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction and hydronephrosis from other causes. The neonates were also categorized according to their outcome: no treatment, follow-up only and surgical treatment. In 17 neonates (30.4%), and 19 renal units, the diagnosis of hydronephrosis was excluded post-natally. In 39 neonates (69.6%), and 54 renal units, an urinary tract pathology was confirmed. The dynamics of pyelectasis in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy differed significantly among the neonates when categorized according to the final diagnosis (P < 0.05), or according to outcome (P < 0.05). It is possible to predict, and distinguish between, long-term conservative and surgical treatments of renal pelvis dilatation in the third trimester of pregnancy.
    Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology 07/2000; 16(1):60-2. · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Early morning urine osmolality was tested in two urinary specimens, one taken immediately upon awakening and the other approximately 30 min thereafter, in 52 enuretic and 15 non-enuretic children. In a follow-up study, using the same study population, urine osmolality and volume were measured sequentially at 3-h intervals at 19.00, 22.00, 01.00, 04.00 and 07.00 h. Thereafter, all enuretics were treated by intranasal DDAVP for a 6-month period. There were no differences in urinary osmolality between enuretic and non-enuretic children when comparing the two early morning specimens. Nor were there any differences between groups in urine osmolalities at 19.00, 01.00 and 07.00 h. In contrast, at 04.00 h, urine osmolality was significantly lower in 17 of 52 enuretics [designated as ADH-negative (ADH-)] compared to the remaining enuretics [designated as ADH-positive (ADH+)] and non-enuretic children (610 +/- 251 vs 995 +/- 195 and 1089 +/- 195 mosmol/kg H2O, respectively, p < 0.05). This decreased osmolality was paralleled by an increase in urine production during the time period 01.00-04.00 (83 +/- 24 vs 52 +/- 18 and 45 +/- 22 ml, respectively, p < 0.05). At the end of the 6-month period of DDAVP treatment, the percentage response was similar between the ADH- and ADH+ enuretics (79% vs 75%). However, the time taken to achieve a response was quicker in the ADH- subjects. These data suggest the existence of a subgroup of enuretics whose underlying pathophysiology is the development of nocturnal polyuria probably due to a relative night-time ADH deficiency. Nocturnal sequential monitoring of urinary osmolality, as described above, allows identification of this subgroup.
    Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology 07/2000; 34(3):199-202. · 1.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the influence on blood pressure in schoolchildren, of elevated sodium (Na(+)) and nitrate (NO(-)(3)) levels in the drinking water. The blood pressure was recorded in three groups of age- and weight-matched schoolchildren (fourth and fifth graders) ingesting differing Na(+) and NO(-)(3) concentrations with their drinking water. Group 1 (n = 452) imbibed high-Na(+), high-NO(-)(3) water (196 and 49 mg/l, respectively); group 2 (n = 418) consumed low-Na(+), high-NO(-)(3) water (25 and 49 mg/l, respectively) and group 3 (n = 86) drank low-Na(+), low-NO(-)(3) water (35 and 25 mg/l, respectively). The chloride (Cl(-)) concentrations varied in parallel to those of Na(+). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were significantly increased in group 1 versus groups 2 and 3 (115.6 +/- 12.2 and 86.4 +/- 9.6 mm Hg vs. 111.1 +/- 11.6 and 83 +/- 8.3 and 107 +/- 8.8 and 81 +/- 7.2 mm Hg, respectively, p < 0.05). The SBP in group 2 was also significantly higher than in group 3 (111.1 +/- 11.6 vs. 107 +/- 8.8 mm Hg; p < 0.05). Elevated Na(+) (and possibly Cl(-)) in combination with high NO(-)(3) concentrations in drinking water leads to an increase of SBP and MAP in fourth and fifth graders. The effects of Na(+) (and/or Cl(-)) and NO(-)(3) on SBP and MAP appear to be additive, yet independent of each other.
    Kidney and Blood Pressure Research 02/2000; 23(6):400-3. · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute renal failure was diagnosed within 6 days of birth in a full-term neonate. The mother was known to have a monoclonal gammopathy, immunoglobulin G (IgG) lambda, discovered a year before pregnancy on being investigated for hematuria and proteinuria. Her renal function was intact. Maternal renal biopsy performed at the time showed a focal proliferative glomerulonephritis with nonfibrillary homogeneous mesangial and intramembranous electron-dense deposits. Immunoperoxidase staining was positive for IgG and lambda and kappa light chains along the glomerular and tubular basement membranes. Pregnancy was uneventful. Protein electrophoresis and immunofixation of the infant girl's serum and urine samples showed the presence of a paraprotein electrophoretically identical to that found in the mother. Exchange transfusion resulted in a rapid improvement of renal function in parallel to the disappearance of the monoclonal component.
    American Journal of Kidney Diseases 01/2000; 34(6):1129-31. · 5.29 Impact Factor