Paula M Luz

Instituto Evandro Chagas, Ananindeua, Pará, Brazil

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Publications (66)216.22 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We describe CD4 counts at 6-month intervals for 5 years after combination antiretroviral therapy initiation among 12 879 antiretroviral-naive human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults from Latin America and the Caribbean. Median CD4 counts increased from 154 cells/mm3 at baseline (interquartile range [IQR], 60–251) to 413 cells/mm3 (IQR, 234–598) by year 5.
    06/2015; 2(2). DOI:10.1093/ofid/ofv079
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    ABSTRACT: In Brazil, the rate of cervical cancer remains high despite the availability of screening programs. With ongoing vaccine development and implementation, information on the prevalence of specific HPV types is needed, particularly among high-risk populations, such as HIV-infected women. We performed a study of HIV-infected women in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, who underwent cervical HPV genotype testing between 2005-2013. We examined the prevalence of high-risk HPV types and the patterns of high-risk HPV type clustering. Using logarithmic binomial regression, we estimated the risk of abnormal cytology by HPV genotype result. Of the 562 women included, 498 (89 %) had at least one HPV type detected. 364 women (65 %) had at least one high-risk HPV type detected and 181 (32 %) had more than one high-risk type detected. HPV 58 was the most frequent HPV type detected overall (prevalence 19.8 % [95 % confidence interval 16.4-23.1]), followed by HPV 53 (prevalence 15.5 % [12.5-18.5]) and HPV 16 (prevalence 13 % [10.2-15.8]). Women infected with more than one high-risk HPV type were younger, had lower CD4+ lymphocyte counts, and were more likely to be infected with HPV 16 or 18. In adjusted analyses, presence of more than one high-risk HPV type was associated with a two-fold increased risk of abnormal cytology after adjusting for presence of individual high-risk type, age, and CD4+ lymphocyte count (adjusted prevalence ratios 1.88-2.07, all p <0.001). No single high-risk HPV type was statistically associated with abnormal cytology after adjusting for the presence of more than one high-risk HPV type. In the largest study of cervical HPV genotypes among HIV-infected women in Latin America, infection by high-risk HPV types other than 16 or 18 and infection by more than one high-risk HPV types were common. Infection by more than one high-risk type was more strongly associated with abnormal cervical cytology than any individual high-risk HPV type, highlighting the need for multi-valent HPV vaccines.
    BMC Cancer 06/2015; 15(1):478. DOI:10.1186/s12885-015-1486-4 · 3.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. The Pan-American Health Organization has called for reducing HIV mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) to ≤0.30 infections per 1000 live births (LB), HIV MTCT risk to ≤2.0%, and congenital syphilis (CS) incidence to ≤0.50/1000LB in the Americas by 2015. Methods. Using published Brazilian data in a mathematical model, we simulated a cohort of pregnant women from antenatal care (ANC) through birth. We investigated two scenarios: (1) “current access” (89.1% receive an ANC syphilis test and 41.1% receive two; 81.7% receive an ANC HIV test and 18.9% receive birth tests; if diagnosed, 81.0% are treated for syphilis and 87.5% are treated for HIV) and (2) “ideal access” (95% of women undergo two HIV and syphilis screenings; 95% receive appropriate treatment). We conducted univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses on key inputs. Results. With “current access,” we projected 2.95 CS cases/1000LB, 0.29 HIV infections/1000LB, 7.1% HIV MTCT risk, and 11.11 intra-uterine fetal demises (IUFD)/1000 pregnancies, with significant regional variation. With “ideal access,” we projected improved outcomes: 1.00 CS cases/1000LB, 0.10 HIV infections/1000LB, HIV MTCT risk of 2.4%, and 10.65 IUFD/1000 pregnancies. Increased testing drove the greatest improvements. Even with “ideal access,” only HIV infections/1000LB met elimination goals. Achieving all targets required testing and treatment >95% and reductions in prevalence and incidence of HIV and syphilis. Conclusions. Increasing access to care and HIV and syphilis antenatal testing will substantially reduce HIV and syphilis MTCT in Brazil. Additional, regionally-tailored interventions reducing syphilis incidence and prevalence and supporting HIV treatment adherence are necessary to completely meet targets.
    06/2015; 2(2). DOI:10.1093/ofid/ofv073
  • Journal of the International AIDS Society 04/2015; 18(3 (Suppl 2)). DOI:10.7448/IAS.18.3.20131 · 4.21 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Hepatology 04/2015; 62:S826. DOI:10.1016/S0168-8278(15)31444-6 · 10.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many studies of HIV/AIDS aggregate data from multiple cohorts to improve power and generalizability. There are several analysis approaches to account for cross-cohort heterogeneity; we assessed how different approaches can impact results from an HIV/AIDS study investigating predictors of mortality. Using data from 13,658 HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy from seven Latin American and Caribbean cohorts, we illustrate the assumptions of seven readily implementable approaches to account for across cohort heterogeneity with Cox proportional hazards models, and we compare hazard ratio estimates across approaches. As a sensitivity analysis, we modify cohort membership to generate specific heterogeneity conditions. Hazard ratio estimates varied slightly between the seven analysis approaches, but differences were not clinically meaningful. Adjusted hazard ratio estimates for the association between AIDS at treatment initiation and death varied from 2.00 to 2.20 across approaches that accounted for heterogeneity; the adjusted hazard ratio was estimated as 1.73 in analyses that ignored across cohort heterogeneity. In sensitivity analyses with more extreme heterogeneity, we noted slightly greater distinction between approaches. Despite substantial heterogeneity between cohorts, the impact of the specific approach to account for heterogeneity was minimal in our case study. Our results suggest that it is important to account for across cohort heterogeneity in analyses, but that the specific technique for addressing heterogeneity may be less important. Because of their flexibility in accounting for cohort heterogeneity, we prefer stratification or meta-analysis methods, but we encourage investigators to consider their specific study conditions and objectives.
    AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses 02/2015; 31(5). DOI:10.1089/AID.2014.0241 · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: With successful antiretroviral therapy, non-communicable diseases, including malignancies, are increasingly contributing to morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected persons. The epidemiology of AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs) and non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs) in HIV-infected populations in Brazil has not been well described. It is not known if cancer trends in HIV-infected populations in Brazil are similar to those of other countries where antiretroviral therapy is also widely available. We performed a retrospective analysis of clinical cohorts at Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas (INI) in Rio de Janeiro and Vanderbilt Comprehensive Care Clinic (VCCC) in Nashville from 1998 to 2010. We used Poisson regression and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) to examine incidence trends. Clinical and demographic predictors of ADCs and NADCs were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. This study included 2,925 patients at INI and 3,927 patients at VCCC. There were 57 ADCs at INI (65% Kaposi sarcoma), 47 at VCCC (40% Kaposi sarcoma), 45 NADCs at INI, and 82 at VCCC. From 1998 to 2004, incidence of ADCs remained statistically unchanged at both sites. From 2005 to 2010, ADC incidence decreased in both cohorts (INI incidence rate ratio per year = 0.74, p < 0.01; VCCC = 0.75, p < 0.01). Overall Kaposi sarcoma incidence was greater at INI than VCCC (3.0 vs. 1.2 cases per 1,000 person-years, p < 0.01). Incidence of NADCs remained constant throughout the study period (overall INI incidence 3.6 per 1,000 person-years and VCCC incidence 5.3 per 1,000 person-years). Compared to general populations, overall risk of NADCs was increased at both sites (INI SIR = 1.4 [95% CI 1.1-1.9] and VCCC SIR = 1.3 [1.0-1.7]). After non-melanoma skin cancers, the most frequent NADCs were anal cancer at INI (n = 7) and lung cancer at VCCC (n = 11). In multivariate models, risk of ADC was associated with male sex and immunosuppression. Risk of NADC was associated with increased age. In both cohorts, ADCs have decreased over time, though incidence of KS was higher at INI than VCCC. Rates of NADCs remained constant over time at both sites.
    Infectious Agents and Cancer 02/2015; 10(1):4. DOI:10.1186/1750-9378-10-4 · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the United States (USA), the age of those newly diagnosed with HIV is changing, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM). A retrospective analysis included HIV-infected adults from seven sites in the Caribbean, Central and South America network (CCASAnet) and the Vanderbilt Comprehensive Care Clinic (VCCC-Nashville, Tennessee, USA). We estimated the proportion of patients <25 years at HIV diagnosis by calendar year among the general population and MSM. 19,466 (CCASAnet) and 3,746 (VCCC) patients were included. The proportion <25 years at diagnosis in VCCC increased over time for both the general population and MSM (p < 0.001). Only in the Chilean site for the general population and the Brazilian site for MSM were similar trends seen. Subjects <25 years of age at diagnosis were less likely to be immunocompromised at enrollment at both the VCCC and CCASAnet. Recent trends in the USA of greater numbers of newly diagnosed young patients were not consistently observed in Latin America and the Caribbean. Prevention efforts tailored to young adults should be increased.
    AIDS and Behavior 01/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10461-014-0974-x · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) may create unique risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency, including alterations of vitamin D metabolism by ART. We prospectively compared demographic and clinical parameters between vitamin D sufficient and insufficient HIV-infected (HIV+) adults, and assessed changes in these parameters among insufficient participants following standardized vitamin D supplementation. HIV+ adults (≥18 years old) with HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL on ART were enrolled. Vitamin D sufficiency and insufficiency were defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) ≥30 or <30 ng/mL, respectively. Insufficient participants received open-label vitamin D3 50,000 IU twice weekly for 5 weeks, then 8000 IU twice weekly to complete 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was success or failure to achieve 25(OH)D ≥30 ng/mL at week 24. Ninety-seven participants enrolled (34 vitamin D sufficient, 63 insufficient); 32 % female, 47 % non-White, median age 46 years, ART duration 5 years, CD4+ T lymphocyte count (CD4) 673 cells/mm(3). 25(OH)D repletion was 83 % (95 % CI 71 %-90 %) successful. 25(OH)D levels correlated with both CD4 (r = 0.44, p = 0.01) and time on protease inhibitor (r = -0.35, p = 0.01). After adjusting for age, sex, race, nadir CD4 and baseline 25(OH)D: 1) current use of efavirenz exposure was associated with a 21.1 ng/mL higher week 24 25(OH)D level (p = 0.007), 2) per year use of zidovudine was associated with 7.1 ng/mL reduction in week 24 serum 25(OH)D (p = 0.05) and 3) every 1 ng/mL 25(OH)D increase was associated with a 3.3 cell/mm(3) CD4 increase (p = 0.06). Vitamin D3 supplementation was effective in repleting 25(OH)D levels after 24 weeks. Current efavirenz use was positively associated with post-repletion 25(OH)D levels, while greater time on zidovudine was associated with lower post-repletion 25(OH)D levels. The association between improved CD4 recovery and vitamin D repletion suggests a potential benefit of vitamin D supplementation on immunologic recovery during HIV treatment. This trial is registered at The Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry ( U1111-1165-2537 ).
    Nutrition Journal 01/2015; 14(1):81. DOI:10.1186/s12937-015-0072-6 · 2.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Worldwide the prevalence of smoking among people living with HIV/AIDS is elevated compared to the general population. This probably reflects the cluster of individual characteristics that have shared risk factors for HIV infection and smoking. A cross-sectional study, enrolling a convenience sample from a Brazilian HIV clinical cohort was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of tobacco smoking and the factors associated with current smoking and abstinence. A total of 2,775 HIV-infected individuals were interviewed: 46.2% have never smoked, 29.9% were current smokers and 23.9% were former smokers. Current smokers had a higher prevalence of alcohol and illicit drug use when compared to the other two groups. A higher proportion of heterosexual individuals were former smokers or never smokers while among men who have sex with men (MSM) a higher proportion were current smokers. Former smokers had been more frequently diagnosed with high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases and depression, while for current smokers lung diseases were more frequent. Former smokers and current smokers were more likely to have had any hospital admission (42.0% and 41.2%, respectively) than participants who never smoked (33.5%) (p<0.001). Multivariate model results showed that current smokers (versus never smokers) were more likely to be less educated, to report the use of alcohol, crack and cocaine and to present clinical comorbidities. Former smokers (versus current smokers) were more likely to be older, to have smoked for a shorter amount of time and to have smoked >31 cigarettes/day. MSM (compared to heterosexuals) and cocaine users (versus non-users) had lower odds of being former smokers. Considering our results, smoking cessation interventions should be tailored to younger individuals, MSM and substance users.
    PLoS ONE 12/2014; 9(12):e115900. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0115900 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background World-wide, the notable expansion of HIV/AIDS treatment programs in resource-limited settings has lead to an increasing number of patients in need of second-line cART. To adequately address and prepare for this scenario, critical assessments of the outcomes of second-line cART are particularly relevant in settings where monitoring strategies may be inadequate. We evaluated virologic outcomes of second-line combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) among HIV-infected individuals from Brazil.Methods This study was conducted at the Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, at Rio de Janeiro, Brazio. For this study we included all patients who started first-line and second-line cART between 2000 and 2013. Second-line cART required a switch in the anchor drug of first-line cART. We evaluated time from second-line start to virologic failure and factors associated with increased risk of failure using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models.ResultsAmong the 1,311 patients who started first-line cART a total of 386 patients (29.5%) initiated second-line cART, out of which 35.0% and 60.6% switched from their first-line to their second-line cART when their HIV RNA was undetectable and after documented virologic failure, respectively. At second line cART initiation, median age was 38 years [interquartile range (IQR): 31-45years]. Median CD4 count was significantly different for patients starting second-line cART undetectable [412 cells/mm3 (IQR: 240-617)] compared to those starting second-line cART after documented virologic failure [230 cells/mm3 (IQR: 118-322.5)] (p¿<¿0.01). Median time from second-line cART initiation to failure was also significantly different for patients starting second-line cART undetectable compared to those who with documented virologic failure (log-rank test p¿<¿0.01). Multivariable Cox models showed that younger age, lower education, and HIV RNA level were independently associated with an increased hazard of second-line failure among those with documented virologic failure at start of second-line cART.Conclusions We have shown that in a middle-income country with universal access to cART, having a detectable HIV RNA at the start of second-line cART as well as younger age and lower education negatively impact second-line outcomes. Our findings could guide HIV treatment efforts as to which strategies would help maximize the durability of these regimens.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 12/2014; 14(1):699. DOI:10.1186/s12879-014-0699-5 · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: HIV genotype-resistance testing can help identify more effective antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens for patients, substantially increasing the likelihood of viral suppression and immune recovery. We sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of genotype-resistance testing prior to 1st-line ART initiation in Brazil. We used a previously published microsimulation of HIV disease (CEPAC-International) and data from Brazil to compare the clinical impact, costs, and cost-effectiveness of initial genotype testing (Genotype) to no initial genotype testing (No genotype). Model parameters were derived from the HIV Clinical Cohort at the Evandro Chagas Clinical Research Institute and from published data, using Brazilian sources whenever possible. Baseline patient characteristics included: 69% male, mean age 36 years (SD 10 years), mean CD4 count 347/µL (SD 300/µL) at ART initiation, annual ART costs from 2012 US$1,400 to US$13,400, genotype test cost of US$230, and primary resistance prevalence of 4.4%. Life expectancy and costs were discounted 3%/year. Genotype was defined as "cost-effective" compared to No Genotype if its incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was less than 3x the 2012 Brazilian per capita GDP of US$12,300. Compared to No genotype, Genotype increased life-expectancy from 18.45 to 18.47 years and reduced lifetime cost from US$45,000 to $44,770; thus, in the base case, Genotype was cost-saving. Genotype was cost-effective at primary resistance prevalences as low as 1.4% and remained cost-effective when subsequent-line ART costs decreased to 30% of baseline value. Cost-inefficient results were observed only when simultaneously holding multiple parameters to extremes of their plausible ranges. Genotype-resistance testing in ART-naïve individuals in Brazil will improve survival and decrease costs and should be incorporated into HIV treatment guidelines in Brazil.
    JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 11/2014; 68(2). DOI:10.1097/QAI.0000000000000426 · 4.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Identifying factors, including human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes, associated with abnormal anal cytology in HIV-infected women have implications for anal squamous cell cancer (SCC) prevention in HIV-infected women. Anal and cervical samples were collected for cytology, and tested for high-(HR-HPV) and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) genotypes in a cross-sectional analysis of the IPEC Women's HIV Cohort (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Multivariate log-binomial regression models estimated prevalence ratios for factors associated with abnormal anal cytology [≥atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, (ASC-US)]. Characteristics of the 863 participants included: median age 42 years, 57% non-white, 79% current CD4+ T-cell count >350 cells/mm(3), 53% HIV-1 viral load <50 copies/mL, median ART duration 5.8 years. Fifty-one percent of anal specimens contained ≥1 HR-HPV genotype; 31% had abnormal anal cytology [14% ASC-US, 11% low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesion, (LSIL); 2% atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high-grade SIL (ASC-H); 4% high-grade SIL/cancer (HSIL+)]. In multivariate analysis, cervical LSIL+, nadir CD4+ T-cell count ≤50 cells/mm(3), HIV-1 viral load ≥50 copies/mL, and anal HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 33, 45, 52, 56, and 58 were associated with ≥anal ASC-US (p<0.05). Abnormal anal cytology and HR-HPV prevalences were high. HIV-infected women with cervical LSIL+, low nadir CD4+ counts, or detectable HIV-1 viral loads should be a particular focus for enhanced anal SCC screening efforts.
    AIDS PATIENT CARE and STDs 10/2014; 29(1). DOI:10.1089/apc.2014.0166 · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: In the United States, the demographics of persons newly diagnosed with HIV are changing: an increasing proportion are younger (<25 years), particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM). It is unknown if similar trends are occurring in other regions of the world. Methods: A retrospective analysis included HIV-infected adults (≥18 years of age) from 7 sites in the Caribbean, Central and South America network (CCASAnet) and the Vanderbilt Comprehensive Care Clinic (VCCC-Nashville, Tennessee, USA). We sought to estimate the proportion of patients <25 years at HIV diagnosis by calendar year. A secondary analysis was repeated among MSM. Results: 19,466 patients from CCASAnet and 3,746 from VCCC were included. Of these, 4650 (23%) and 1574 (40%) self-identified as MSM in CCASAnet and VCCC, respectively. Of those with a date of HIV diagnosis (80% and 95%, for CCASAnet and VCCC patients, respectively), 15% of CCASAnet and 19% of VCCC patients, were <25 years old. The proportion of VCCC patients <25 years at diagnosis changed over time (p<0.001) and non-linearly (p<0.001), ranging from <20% from 1998-2005, followed by an increase to 25% by 2010 (Figure 1). In contrast, the proportion of CCASAnet patients <25 years at diagnosis decreased significantly over time in Argentina, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico and Peru (p<0.05), with no change observed in Brazil and Chile (p>0.05). Although the proportion of MSM <25 years at diagnosis increased in VCCC since 2005 (p<0.001), a similar change did not occur in CCASAnet, except in Brazil (p=0.002) (Figure 2). Subjects <25 years at diagnosis were less likely to have AIDS at enrollment vs. those >25 (29% vs. 37% for CCASAnet, and 8% vs. 14% for VCCC; p<0.001 for both), and had higher CD4+ (median CD4+ 251 vs. 180 cell/mm3 in CCASAnet and 389 vs. 306 cell/mm3 in VCCC; p<0.001 for both). Conclusion: Similar to the USA, in recent years the VCCC has had a greater proportion of newly diagnosed patients who are <25 years of age, both among the general population and MSM. Similar trends were not consistently observed in CCASAnet. Patients <25 years at HIV diagnosis in both cohorts were less immunocompromised. Differences in presenting risk factors should be explored, and prevention efforts tailored to young adults should be increased.
    IDWeek 2014 Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America; 10/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Background While Brazil has had a long-standing policy of free access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all in need, the epidemiological impact of ART on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA suppression in this middle-income country has not been well evaluated. We estimate first-line ART effectiveness in a large Brazilian cohort and examine the socio-demographic, behavioral, clinical and structural factors associated with virologic suppression. Methods Virologic suppression on first-line ART at 6, 12, and 24 months from start of ART was defined as having a viral load measurement ≤400 copies/mL without drug class modification and/or discontinuation. Drug class modification and/or discontinuation were defined based on the class of a particular drug. Quasi-Poisson regression was used to quantify the association of factors with virologic suppression. Results From January 2000 through June 2010, 1311 patients started first-line ART; 987 (75%) patients used NNRTI-based regimens. Virologic suppression was achieved by 77%, 76% and 68% of patients at 6, 12 and 24 months, respectively. Factors associated with virologic suppression at 12 months were: >8 years of formal education (compared to <4 years, risk ratio (RR) 1.13, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.03-1.24), starting ART in 2005-2010 (compared to 2000-2004, RR 1.25 95% CI 1.15-1.35), and clinical trial participation (compared to no participation, RR 1.08 95% CI 1.01-1.16). Also at 12 months, women showed less virologic suppression compared to heterosexual men (RR 0.90 95% CI 0.82-0.99). For the 24-month endpoint, in addition to higher education, starting ART in the later period, and clinical trial participation, older age and an NNRTI-based regimen were also independently associated with virologic suppression. Conclusions Our results show that in Brazil, a middle-income country with free access to treatment, over three-quarters of patients receiving routine care reached virologic suppression on first-line ART by the end of the first year. Higher education, more recent ART initiation and clinical trial participation were associated with improved outcomes both for the 12-month and the 24-month endpoints, suggesting that further studies are needed to understand what aspects relating to these factors lead to higher virologic suppression.
    AIDS Research and Therapy 09/2014; 11:29. DOI:10.1186/1742-6405-11-29 · 1.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Previous cohort studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on viral load suppression. We aimed to examine the factors associated with virologic suppression for HIV-infected patients on ART receiving care at the Evandro Chagas Clinical Research Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Methods HIV-1 RNA levels and CD4+ T-cell counts at the date closest to midyear (1 July) were evaluated for 1,678 ART-naïve patients ≥18 years of age initiating ART between 1997 and 2010. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for having an undetectable viral load (≤400 copies/mL) were estimated using generalized estimating equations regression models adjusted for clinical and demographic factors. Time-updated covariates included age, years since HIV diagnosis, hepatitis C diagnosis and ART interruptions. Results Between 1997 and 2011, the proportion of patients with an undetectable viral load increased from 6% to 78% and the median [interquartile range] CD4+ T-cell count increased from 207 [162, 343] to 554 [382, 743] cells/μL. Pre-treatment median CD4+ T-cell count significantly increased over the observation period from 114 [37, 161] to 237 [76, 333] cells/μL (p < .001). The per-year adjusted OR (aOR) for having undetectable viral load was 1.18 (95% CI = 1.16-1.21). ART interruptions >1 month per calendar significantly decreased the odds [aOR = 0.32 (95% CI = 0.27-0.38)] of having an undetectable viral load. Patients initiating on a protease inhibitor (PI)-based first-line regimen were less likely to have undetectable viral load [aOR = 0.72 (95% CI = 0.63-0.83)] compared to those initiating on a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimen. Conclusions Our results demonstrate significant improvements in virologic outcomes from 1997 to 2011, which persisted after adjusting for other factors. This may in part be due to improvements in care and new treatment options. NNRTI- versus PI-based first-line regimens were found to be associated with increased odds of having an undetectable viral load, consistent with previous studies. Treatment interruptions were found to be the most important determinant of not having an undetectable viral load. Studies are needed to characterize the reasons for treatment interruptions and to develop subsequent strategies for improving adherence to ART.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 06/2014; 14(1):322. DOI:10.1186/1471-2334-14-322 · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To assess the temporal trends in incidence of AIDS-defining opportunistic illnesses in an urban cohort of a middle-income country. Methods HIV infected patients aged ≥18 years at cohort entry were included in this analysis. We calculated incidence rates per 1000 persons-years of observation for the first opportunistic illness presented after cohort enrollment, from 1987 to 2012. Trends for overall and specific opportunistic illnesses were tested and incidence rate ratios for the most recent calendar period were calculated as the ratio between the incidence rate observed in the most recent period of the study (2009–2012) and the incidence rate observed in first period of the study (1987–1990). Results Overall, 3378 patients were included in this analysis; of which 1119 (33%) patients presented an opportunistic illness during follow up. Incidence rates of all opportunistic illnesses decreased over time, and the overall opportunistic illness incidence rates fell from 295.4/1000 persons-years in 1987–1990 to 34.6/1000 persons-years in 2009–2012. Tuberculosis, esophageal candidiasis, cerebral toxoplasmosis and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia were the most incident opportunistic illnesses in the cohort. Tuberculosis had the highest incidence rate in the study period. The peak in tuberculosis incidence occurred in 1991–1993 (80.8/1000 persons-years). Cerebral toxoplasmosis was the third most incident opportunistic illness in the study, with a peak of incidence of 43.6/1000 persons-year in 1987–1990. Conclusions All opportunistic illnesses incidence rates decreased over the years but they still occur in an unacceptable frequency. Tuberculosis co-infection among HIV-infected persists as an important challenge for health care professionals and policy makers in our setting. Impressively high rates of cerebral toxoplasmosis were found suggesting that its incidence among HIV-infected is linked to the high prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in the general population.
    PLoS ONE 06/2014; 9(6):e98666. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0098666 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background In high-income settings, the spectrum of morbidity and mortality experienced by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected individuals receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has switched from predominantly AIDS-related to non-AIDS-related conditions. In the context of universal access to care, we evaluated whether that shift would apply in Brazil, a middle-income country with universal access to treatment, as compared to France. Methods Two hospital-based cohorts of HIV-infected individuals were used for this analysis: the ANRS CO3 Aquitaine Cohort in South Western France and the Evandro Chagas Research Institute (IPEC) Cohort of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Severe morbid events (AIDS- and non-AIDS-related) were defined as all clinical diagnoses associated with a hospitalization of ≥48 hours. Trends in the incidence rate of events and their determinants were estimated while adjusting for within-subject correlation using generalized estimating equations models with an auto-regressive correlation structure and robust standard errors. Result Between January 2000 and December 2008, 7812 adult patients were followed for a total of 41,668 person-years (PY) of follow-up. Throughout the study period, 90% of the patients were treated with cART. The annual incidence rate of AIDS and non-AIDS events, and of deaths significantly decreased over the years, from 6.2, 21.1, and 1.9 AIDS, non-AIDS events, and deaths per 100 PY in 2000 to 4.3, 14.9, and 1.5/100 PY in 2008. The annual incidence rates of non-AIDS events surpassed that of AIDS-events during the entire study period. High CD4 cell counts were associated with a lower incidence rate of AIDS and non-AIDS events as well as with lower rates of specific non-AIDS events, such as bacterial, hepatic, viral, neurological, and cardiovascular conditions. Adjusted analysis showed that severe morbidity was associated with lower CD4 counts and higher plasma HIV RNAs but not with setting (IPEC versus Aquitaine). Conclusions As information on severe morbidities for HIV-infected patients remain scarce, data on hospitalizations are valuable to identify priorities for case management and to improve the quality of life of patients with a chronic disease requiring life-long treatment. Immune restoration is highly effective in reducing AIDS and non-AIDS severe morbid events irrespective of the setting.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 05/2014; 14(1):278. DOI:10.1186/1471-2334-14-278 · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: After antiretroviral therapy (ART) became available, there was a decline in the number of deaths in persons infected with HIV. Thereafter, there was a decrease in the proportion of deaths attributed to opportunistic infections and an increase in the proportion of deaths attributed to chronic comorbidities. Herein we extend previous observations from a nationwide survey on temporal trends in causes of death in HIV-infected patients in Brazil. We describe temporal trends in causes of death among adults who had HIV/AIDS listed in the death certificate to those who did not. All death certificates issued in Brazil from 1999 to 2011 and listed in the national mortality database were included. Generalized linear mixed-effects logistic models were used to study temporal trends in proportions. In the HIV-infected population, there was an annual adjusted average increase of 6.0%, 12.0%, 4.0% and 4.1% for cancer, external causes, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (DM), respectively, compared to 3.0%, 4.0%, 1.0% and 3.9%, in the non-HIV group. For tuberculosis (TB), there was an adjusted average increase of 0.3%/year and a decrease of 3.0%/year in the HIV and the non-HIV groups, respectively. Compared to 1999, the odds ratio (OR) for cancer, external causes, CVD, DM, or TB in the HIV group were, respectively, 2.31, 4.17, 1.76, 2.27 and 1.02, while for the non-HIV group, the corresponding OR were 1.31, 1.63, 1.14, 1.62 and 0.67. Interactions between year as a continuous or categorical variable and HIV were significant (p<0.001) for all conditions, except for DM when year was considered as a continuous variable (p = 0.76). Non HIV-related co-morbidities continue to increase more rapidly as causes of death among HIV-infected individuals than in those without HIV infection, highlighting the need for targeting prevention measures and surveillance for chronic diseases among those patients.
    PLoS ONE 04/2014; 9(4):e94636. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0094636 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: With the introduction of combined active antiretroviral therapy and the improved survival of HIV-infected patients, degenerative diseases and drug toxicity have emerged as long-term concerns. We studied the prevalence of decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and associated risk factors in a cohort of HIV-infected patients from a middle-income country. Our cross-sectional study included all adult patients who attended an urban outpatient clinic in 2008. GFR was estimated using the CKD-EPI equation. The prevalence ratio (PR) of decreased GFR (defined as <60 mL/min/1.73 m2) was estimated using generalizing linear models assuming a Poisson distribution. We analyzed data from 1,970 patients, of which 82.9% had been exposed to ART. A total of 249 patients (12.6%) had a GFR between 60 and 89 mL/min/1.73 m2, 3.1% had a GFR between 30 and 59, 0.3% had a GFR between 15 and 29, and 0.4% had a GFR <15. Decreased GFR was found in only 74 patients (3.8%). In the multivariate regression model, the factors that were independently associated with a GFR below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 were as follows: age ≥50 years (PR = 3.4; 95% CI: 1.7-6.8), diabetes (PR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.2-3.4), hypertension (PR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.3-3.2), current CD4+ cell count <350 cells/mm3 (PR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.3-3.3), past exposure to tenofovir (PR = 4.7; 95% CI: 2.3-9.4) and past exposure to indinavir (PR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.0-2.8). As in high-income countries, CKD was the predominant form of kidney involvement among HIV-infected individuals in our setting. The risk factors associated with decreased glomerular filtration were broad and included virus-related factors as well as degenerative and nephrotoxic factors. Despite the potential for nephrotoxicity associated with some antiretroviral drugs, in the short-term, advanced chronic renal disease remains very rare.
    PLoS ONE 04/2014; 9(4):e93748. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0093748 · 3.23 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

577 Citations
216.22 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2015
    • Instituto Evandro Chagas
      • Laboratório de Pesquisa Clínica em DST/Aids
      Ananindeua, Pará, Brazil
  • 2001–2014
    • Fundação Oswaldo Cruz
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 2009–2011
    • Yale-New Haven Hospital
      New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • 2009–2010
    • Yale University
      • Department of Public Health
      New Haven, Connecticut, United States