D A Cheresh

National University (California), San Diego, California, United States

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Publications (243)2421.17 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) can associate with integrin alpha(v)beta3 on the surface of endothelial cells, thereby promoting vascular invasion. Here, we describe an organic molecule (TSRI265) selected for its ability to bind to integrin alphav(v)beta3 and block alpha(v)beta3 interaction with MMP2. Although disrupting alpha(v)beta3/MMP2 complex formation, TSRI265 has no effect on alpha(v)beta3 binding to its extracellular matrix ligand vitronectin and does not influence MMP2 activation or catalytic activity directly. However, TSRI265 acts as a potent antiangiogenic agent and thereby blocks tumor growth in vivo. These findings suggest that activated MMP2 does not facilitate vascular invasion during angiogenesis unless it forms a complex with alpha(v)beta(3) on the endothelial cell surface. By disrupting endothelial cell invasion without broadly suppressing cell adhesion or MMP function, the use of compounds such as TSRI265 may provide a novel therapeutic approach for diseases associated with uncontrolled angiogenesis.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 02/2001; 98(1):119-24. · 9.81 Impact Factor
  • Neurosurgery 01/2001; 49(2):380-390. · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Integrins are emerging as alternative receptors capable of mediating several biological functions, such as cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion, cell migration, signal transduction, and angiogenesis. Two alpha(v) integrins, i.e., alpha(v)beta3 and alpha(v)beta5, play critical roles in mediating these activities, particularly in tumors. No data are available on the expression of these integrins in meningiomas. Using Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses with LM609 and PG32, two monoclonal antibodies capable of recognizing the functional integrin heterodimer, we evaluated the expression of alpha(v)beta3 and alpha(v)beta5 integrins in a series of 34 meningiomas of different histological subtypes and grades. We studied their expression in tumor cells and vasculature, as well as the expression of their related angiogenic factors (fibroblast growth factor 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor) and the alpha(v)beta3 ligand vitronectin. Alpha(v)beta3 and alpha(v)beta5 integrins were expressed by neoplastic vasculature and cells. Alpha(v)beta3 and alpha(v)beta5 expression was associated and correlated with that of their respective growth factors (fibroblast growth factor 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor) and microvessel counts and densities. Alpha(v)beta3 was more strongly expressed than alpha(v)beta5 in two cases of histologically benign meningiomas with aggressive clinical behavior. Alpha(v)beta3 expression was associated with that of its related ligand vitronectin and was also evident in small vessels of brain tissue closely surrounding meningiomas. Our data demonstrate the expression of alpha(v)beta3 and alpha(v)beta5 integrins in meningioma cells and vasculature. Our findings suggest a role for both of these integrins, and particularly alpha(v)beta3, in meningioma angiogenesis.
    Neurosurgery 12/2000; 47(5):1185-95. · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Modulation of the balance between pro- and antiangiogenic factors holds great promise for the treatment of a broad spectrum of human disease ranging from ischemic heart disease to cancer. This requires both the identification of angiogenic regulators and their efficient delivery to target organs. Here, we demonstrate the use of a noncatalytic fragment of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (termed PEX) delivered by lentiviral vectors in different angiogenesis models. Transduction of human endothelial cells with PEX virus suppressed endothelial invasion and formation of capillary-like structures without affecting chemotaxis in vitro. Lentiviral delivery of PEX blocked basic fibroblast growth factor-induced matrix metalloproteinase 2 activation and angiogenesis on chicken chorioallantoic membranes. PEX expression also inhibited tumor-induced angiogenesis and tumor growth in a nude mouse model. Thus, our study shows that lentiviral vectors can deliver sufficient quantities of antiangiogenic substances to achieve therapeutic effects in vivo.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 11/2000; 97(22):12227-32. · 9.81 Impact Factor
  • B P Eliceiri, D A Cheresh
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    ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis depends on specific molecular interactions between vascular cells and components of the extracellular matrix. This review focuses on the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanism of action of integrins and integrin antagonists during angiogenesis. For example, angiogenesis induced with vascular endothelial growth/permeability factor but not with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) depends on integrin avb5 and Src kinase activity. In contrast, bFGF-induced angiogenesis requires integrin avb3 and functions independently of Src. Recent studies document a role for integrins and growth factor regulation of Src family kinases during angiogenesis. We also discuss the effect of av integrin antagonists on angiogenesis during tumor growth, inflammatory disease, and retinopathy and summarize recent clinical progress in using av integrin antagonists.
    The Cancer Journal 06/2000; 6 Suppl 3:S245-9. · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: alpha(v) integrins have been shown to play an important role in epithelial-derived cell migration, cell growth and tumor invasion/metastasis, however their role on cells of hematopoietic origin is less clear. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human herpesvirus associated with several lymphoproliferative disorders in man, induces expression of alpha(v) integrins on transformed B lymphocytes. In the studies reported here, we show that EBV infection increases alpha(v), beta3 and beta5 integrin subunit mRNAs as well as upregulates the expression of the alphavbeta3 integrin protein on human B cells. Among the nine different EBV proteins expressed in latently infected B cells (nuclear and plasma membrane-associated), only LMP1, LMP2A and EBNA2 were shown to selectively transactivate the alpha(v) integrin promoter. Treatment of EBV-transformed B cells with alpha(v) antisense oligonucleotides specifically reduced cell surface expression of alpha(v) integrins, inhibited cell growth in low serum, reduced cell invasion in matrigels and decreased expression of metalloprotease, MMP9. These studies indicate that alpha(v) integrins play a significant role in EBV-induced B-lymphocyte proliferation and invasion. Strategies to interfere with alphav integrin expression and/or function may therefore be of potential value in the treatment of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders.
    Oncogene 05/2000; 19(15):1915-23. · 8.56 Impact Factor
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    K Wang, T Guan, D A Cheresh, G R Nemerow
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    ABSTRACT: Adenovirus (Ad) cell entry involves sequential interactions with host cell receptors that mediate attachment (CAR), internalization (alphavbeta3 and alphavbeta5), and penetration (alphavbeta5) of the endosomal membrane. These events allow the virus to deliver its genome to the nucleus. While integrins alphavbeta3 and alphavbeta5 both promote Ad internalization into cells, integrin alphavbeta5 selectively facilitates Ad-mediated membrane permeabilization and endosome rupture. In the experiments reported herein, we demonstrate that the intracellular domain of the integrin beta5 subunit specifically regulates Ad-mediated membrane permeabilization and gene delivery. CS-1 melanoma cells expressing a truncated integrin beta5 or a chimeric (beta5-beta3) cytoplasmic tail (CT) supported normal levels of Ad endocytosis but had reduced Ad-mediated gene delivery and membrane permeabilization relative to cells expressing a wild-type integrin beta5. Thin-section electron microscopy revealed that virion particles were capable of being endocytosed into cells expressing a truncated beta5CT, but they failed to escape cytoplasmic vesicles and translocate to the nucleus. Site-specific mutagenesis studies suggest that a C-terminal TVD motif in the beta5CT plays a major role in Ad membrane penetration.
    Journal of Virology 04/2000; 74(6):2731-9. · 5.08 Impact Factor
  • E Bonfoco, W Chen, R Paul, D A Cheresh, N R Cooper
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    ABSTRACT: Integrin receptors mediate several functions including prevention of matrix detachment-induced apoptosis (anoikis) of several adherent cell types. We report here that antagonists of beta1 integrins trigger an apoptotic signaling pathway in adherent differentiated LAN-5 human neuroblastoma cells, a cell line which represents a model system for the study of human neurons. The pathway is characterized by cytochrome c release into the cytoplasm, and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, 4-6h after treatment; cleavage products of caspase-8 and caspase-2 were not detectable in the cells. Coordinate inactivation of cell survival pathways, including cleavage of focal adhesion kinase, decreased expression of protein kinase B, and reduced phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic protein, Bad, also characterized the signaling pathway. These events occurred in adherent cells; DNA fragmentation and detachment followed as late events 18-24h after addition of beta1 integrin antagonists. zDEVD-fmk, an irreversible inhibitor of caspase-3-like enzymes, and cytochalasin D, an actin depolymerizing agent, blocked caspase-3 cleavage and delayed cell death. In contrast to these results, undifferentiated, adherent and dividing LAN-5 cells did not die in response to beta1 integrin antagonists. These studies identify a distinct apoptotic pathway which is triggered by antagonists of beta1 integrins on differentiated adherent neuronal cells.
    Neuroscience 02/2000; 101(4):1145-52. · 3.12 Impact Factor
  • Neurosurgery 01/2000; 47(5):1185-1195. · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Src kinase activity was found to protect endothelial cells from apoptosis during vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-, but not basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-, mediated angiogenesis in chick embryos and mice. In fact, retroviral targeting of kinase-deleted Src to tumor-associated blood vessels suppressed angiogenesis and the growth of a VEGF-producing tumor. Although mice lacking individual Src family kinases (SFKs) showed normal angiogenesis, mice deficient in pp60c-src or pp62c-yes showed no VEGF-induced vascular permeability (VP), yet fyn-/- mice displayed normal VP. In contrast, inflammation-mediated VP appeared normal in Src-deficient mice. Therefore, VEGF-, but not bFGF-, mediated angiogenesis requires SFK activity in general, whereas the VP activity of VEGF specifically depends on the SFKs, Src, or Yes.
    Molecular Cell 01/2000; 4(6):915-24. · 15.28 Impact Factor
  • J Leng, R L Klemke, A C Reddy, D A Cheresh
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    ABSTRACT: The small GTPase Rac is thought to regulate cell movement by influencing actin cytoskeletal organization and membrane ruffling. However, cell migration also depends on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which can regulate myosin motor function, an event critical for cell contraction. Evidence is provided that, during active cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, Rac potentiates the MAPK pathway and influences cell migration by selectively synergizing with Raf kinase but not with Ras or MAPK kinase. In fact, the synergy between Rac and Raf kinase increases the chemotactic sensitivity of cells to epidermal growth factor by 1000-fold. Therefore, the role of Rac in cell migration not only depends on its ability to regulate actin cytoskeletal organization but also on its capacity to potentiate chemokine activation of MAPK in a manner that depends on active cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 12/1999; 274(53):37855-61. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cytokines and extracellular matrix proteins initiate signaling cascades that regulate cell migration and proliferation. Evidence is provided that the adaptor protein Shc can differentially regulate these processes. Specifically, under growth factor-limiting conditions, Shc stimulates haptotactic cell migration without affecting anchorage-dependent proliferation. However, when growth factors are present, Shc no longer influences cell migration; rather, Shc is crucial for DNA synthesis. Mutational analysis of Shc demonstrates that, while tyrosine phosphorylation is required for both DNA synthesis and cell migration, the switch in Shc signaling is associated with differential use of Shc's phosphotyrosine interacting domains; the PTB domain regulates haptotaxis, while the SH2 domain is selectively required for proliferation.
    The Journal of Cell Biology 12/1999; 147(7):1561-8. · 10.82 Impact Factor
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    D A Cheresh, J Leng, R L Klemke
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    ABSTRACT: Cell migration and wound contraction requires assembly of actin into a functional myosin motor unit capable of generating force. However, cell migration also involves formation of actin-containing membrane ruffles. Evidence is provided that actin-myosin assembly and membrane ruffling are regulated by distinct signaling pathways in the migratory cell. Interaction of cells with extracellular matrix proteins or cytokines promote cell migration through activation of the MAP kinases ERK1 and ERK2 as well as the molecular coupling of the adaptor proteins p130CAS and c-CrkII. ERK signaling is independent of CAS/Crk coupling and regulates myosin light chain phosphorylation leading to actin-myosin assembly during cell migration and cell-mediated contraction of a collagen matrix. In contrast, membrane ruffling, but not cell contraction, requires Rac GTPase activity and the formation of a CAS/Crk complex that functions in the context of the Rac activating protein DOCK180. Thus, during cell migration ERK and CAS/Crk coupling operate as components of distinct signaling pathways that control actin assembly into myosin motors and membrane ruffles, respectively.
    The Journal of Cell Biology 10/1999; 146(5):1107-16. · 10.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Integrin αVβ3mediates diverse responses in vascular cells, ranging from cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation to uptake of adenoviruses. However, the extent to which αVβ3 is regulated by changes in receptor conformation (affinity), receptor diffusion/clustering (avidity), or post-receptor events is unknown. Affinity regulation of the related integrin, αIIbβ3, has been established using a monovalent ligand-mimetic antibody, PAC1 Fab. To determine the role of affinity modulation of αVβ3, a novel monovalent ligand-mimetic antibody (WOW-1) was created by replacing the heavy chain hypervariable region 3 of PAC1 Fab with a single αV integrin-binding domain from multivalent adenovirus penton base. Both WOW-1 Fab and penton base bound selectively to activated αVβ3, but not to αIIbβ3, in receptor and cell binding assays. αVβ3 affinity varied with the cell type. Unstimulated B-lymphoblastoid cells bound WOW-1 Fab poorly (apparent K d = 2.4 μm), but acute stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased receptor affinity >30-fold (K d = 80 nm), with no change in receptor number. In contrast, αVβ3 in melanoma cells was constitutively active, but ligand binding could be suppressed by overexpression of β3 cytoplasmic tails. Up-regulation of αVβ3 affinity had functional consequences in that it increased cell adhesion and spreading and promoted adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. These studies establish that αVβ3 is subject to rapid regulated changes in affinity that influence the biological functions of this integrin.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 07/1999; 274(31):21609-21616. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Integrin alpha(V)beta(3) mediates diverse responses in vascular cells, ranging from cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation to uptake of adenoviruses. However, the extent to which alpha(V)beta(3) is regulated by changes in receptor conformation (affinity), receptor diffusion/clustering (avidity), or post-receptor events is unknown. Affinity regulation of the related integrin, alpha(IIb)beta(3), has been established using a monovalent ligand-mimetic antibody, PAC1 Fab. To determine the role of affinity modulation of alpha(V)beta(3), a novel monovalent ligand-mimetic antibody (WOW-1) was created by replacing the heavy chain hypervariable region 3 of PAC1 Fab with a single alpha(V) integrin-binding domain from multivalent adenovirus penton base. Both WOW-1 Fab and penton base bound selectively to activated alpha(V)beta(3), but not to alpha(IIb)beta(3), in receptor and cell binding assays. alpha(V)beta(3) affinity varied with the cell type. Unstimulated B-lymphoblastoid cells bound WOW-1 Fab poorly (apparent K(d) = 2.4 microM), but acute stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased receptor affinity >30-fold (K(d) = 80 nM), with no change in receptor number. In contrast, alpha(V)beta(3) in melanoma cells was constitutively active, but ligand binding could be suppressed by overexpression of beta(3) cytoplasmic tails. Up-regulation of alpha(V)beta(3) affinity had functional consequences in that it increased cell adhesion and spreading and promoted adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. These studies establish that alpha(V)beta(3) is subject to rapid regulated changes in affinity that influence the biological functions of this integrin.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 07/1999; 274(31):21609-16. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Growth and dissemination of malignant melanoma has a profound impact on our population, and little is known concerning the mechanisms controlling this disease in humans. Evidence is provided that integrin alpha(v)beta3 plays a critical role in M21 melanoma tumor survival within human skin by a mechanism independent of its known role in angiogenesis. Antagonists of alpha(v)beta3 blocked melanoma growth by inducing tumor apoptosis. Moreover, M21 melanoma cell interactions with denatured collagen, a known ligand for alpha(v)beta3, caused a 5-fold increase in the relative Bcl-2:Bax ratio, an event thought to promote cell survival. Importantly, denatured collagen colocalized with alpha(v)beta3-expressing melanoma cells in human tumor biopsies, suggesting that alpha(v)beta3 interaction with denatured collagen may play a critical role in melanoma tumor survival in vivo.
    Cancer Research 07/1999; 59(11):2724-30. · 8.65 Impact Factor
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    D G Stupack, C M Storgard, D A Cheresh
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    ABSTRACT: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by distinct autoimmune, inflammatory and fibrovascular components which lead to synovial proliferation and joint destruction. However, existing treatments specifically target only autoimmune and inflammatory components despite the fact that neovascularization of the inflamed synovium is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis. Angiogenesis may contribute to synovial growth, leukocyte recruitment and tissue remodeling, thus potentiating disease progression. Although no therapies currently target angiogenesis, several existing therapies have anti-angiogenic activity. Recent advances in anti-angiogenic strategies in oncology, including the identification of integrin alpha v beta 3 as a crucial effector of angiogenesis, suggest a means to assess the role of angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis. Synovial endothelial cells have been shown to express integrin alpha v beta 3, suggesting that these cells may be targeted for angiogenesis inhibition. Prior studies in rat arthritis models have shown benefit after the addition of broad spectrum integrin antagonists. However, formal assessment of integrin-targeted anti-angiogenic activity is now underway. These controlled studies will be important in assessing the efficacy of therapies which target angiogenesis in RA.
    Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research 06/1999; 32(5):573-81. · 1.14 Impact Factor
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    B P Eliceiri, D A Cheresh
    Journal of Clinical Investigation 06/1999; 103(9):1227-30. · 12.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The suppression and eradication of primary tumors and distant metastases is a major goal of alternative treatment strategies for cancer, such as inhibition of angiogenesis and targeted immunotherapy. We report here a synergy between two novel monotherapies directed against vascular and tumor compartments, respectively, a tumor vasculature-specific antiangiogenic integrin alphav antagonist and tumor-specific antibody-interleukin 2 (IL-2) fusion proteins. Simultaneous and sequential combination of these monotherapies effectively eradicated spontaneous liver metastases in a poorly immunogenic syngeneic model of neuroblastoma. This was in contrast to controls subjected to monotherapies with either an antiangiogenic integrin alphav antagonist or antibody-IL-2 fusion proteins, which were only partially effective at the dose levels applied. Furthermore, simultaneous treatments with the integrin alphav antagonist and tumor-specific antibody-IL-2 fusion proteins induced dramatic primary tumor regressions in three syngeneic murine tumor models, i.e., melanoma, colon carcinoma, and neuroblastoma. However, each agent used as monotherapy induced only a delay in tumor growth. A mechanism for this synergism was suggested because the antitumor response was accompanied by a simultaneous 50% reduction in tumor vessel density and a 5-fold increase in inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment. Subsequently, tumor necrosis was demonstrated only in animals receiving the combination therapy, but not when each agent was applied as monotherapy. The results suggest that these synergistic treatment modalities may provide a novel and effective tool for future therapies of metastatic cancer.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 03/1999; 96(4):1591-6. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lymphocytes accumulate within the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tumor, wound, or inflammatory tissues. These tissues are largely comprised of polymerized adhesion proteins such as fibrin and fibronectin or their fragments. Nonactivated lymphoid cells attach preferentially to polymerized ECM proteins yet are unable to attach to monomeric forms or fragments of these proteins without previous activation. This adhesion event depends on the appropriate spacing of integrin adhesion sites. Adhesion of nonactivated lymphoid cells to polymeric ECM components results in activation of the antigen receptor-associated Syk kinase that accumulates in adhesion-promoting podosomes. In fact, activation of Syk by antigen or agonists, as well as expression of an activated Syk mutant in lymphoid cells, facilitates their adhesion to monomeric ECM proteins or their fragments. These results reveal a cooperative interaction between signals emanating from integrins and antigen receptors that can serve to regulate stable lymphoid cell adhesion and retention within a remodeling ECM.
    The Journal of Cell Biology 03/1999; 144(4):777-88. · 10.82 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

27k Citations
2,421.17 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2014
    • National University (California)
      San Diego, California, United States
    • Vical
      San Diego, California, United States
  • 1992–2014
    • University of California, San Diego
      • • Moores Cancer Center/Oncology
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Medicine
      San Diego, California, United States
  • 2011
    • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1996–2011
    • CSU Mentor
      Long Beach, California, United States
    • Stony Brook University
      • Department of Dermatology
      Stony Brook, NY, United States
  • 1989–2009
    • The Scripps Research Institute
      • • Department of Cell and Molecular Biology
      • • Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine
      • • Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology
      La Jolla, California, United States
    • Michigan State University
      • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
      East Lansing, Michigan, United States
  • 2008
    • University of Massachusetts Medical School
      • Department of Pathology
      Worcester, MA, United States
  • 1995–2003
    • La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology
      La Jolla, California, United States
    • Washington University in St. Louis
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • Division of Neuropathology
      Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • 2002
    • Karolinska Institutet
      Solna, Stockholm, Sweden
    • University of Münster
      • Department of Medicine, Hematology and Oncology
      Münster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2001
    • Salk Institute
      La Jolla, California, United States
  • 1999
    • University of Southern California
      • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
      Los Angeles, CA, United States
  • 1998
    • Azienda Ospedaliera Bianchi-Melacrino-Morelli di Reggio Calabria
      Reggio di Calabria, Calabria, Italy
  • 1991–1993
    • Barnes Jewish Hospital
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
    • University of Washington Seattle
      Seattle, Washington, United States