Turker Yilmaz

Fatih University, İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey

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Publications (7)11.93 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effectiveness of adenoidectomy by defining the remnant volume and localization in nasopharynx, following being satisfied with completeness of removal of the adenoid tissue with digital palpation. A prospective study conducted on 99 patients undergoing adenoidectomy+/-tonsillectomy. The main mass of the patient's adenoid tissue was removed with a sharp adenoid curette without visualization and the surgeon was allowed to palpate the adenoid bed and repeat the curettage until satisfied with completeness of removal. Then nasopharynx was visualized with a laryngeal mirror for defining the anatomical localization of the residual adenoid tissue and curettage completed under indirect mirror visualization. The volumes of the adenoid tissue excised at both stages were measured. By blunt curettage and digital palpation, only 20.2% of the patients (20) had no residual adenoid tissue. In patients who had residual adenoid tissue, the proportion of the median percentage of residual adenoid tissue to total adenoid tissue was 19.98% (range 3.22-50%). The anatomical localization of the residual adenoid tissue were, along the torus tubarius on either side of the nasopharynx in 9 (11.4%), on the pharyngeal roof near choanal openings in 64 (81%), along the torus tubarius on either side of the nasopharynx+on the pharyngeal roof near choanal openings in 5 (6.3%), and on the pharyngeal roof near choanal openings+on the posterior wall of nasopharynx in 1 (1.3%) patients. There was no difference found among surgeons in the percentage and the location of the residue left (p>0.05). Digital palpation is not a dependable technique and visualization of the nasopharynx is crucial for a complete adenoidectomy.
    International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology 04/2010; 74(6):649-51. · 0.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effectiveness of a new device "plasma knife" for tonsillectomy by comparing to two well-established tonsillectomy techniques: cold dissection, and bipolar electrocautery. A prospective, randomized study conducted on 110 patients undergoing tonsillectomy. Subjects were randomized to plasma knife (PKT), cold dissection (CDT) and bipolar electrocautery (BET) groups. Operative time, intraoperative blood loss and postoperative complications were recorded. Pain/discomfort level of patients and healing time of the tonsillar fossae were assessed postoperatively. Data were recorded and statistically analyzed. Operative time with plasma knife and bipolar electrocautery were associated with a significant decrease in operative time compared to cold dissection (p<0.05). Intraoperative blood loss was significantly decreased with plasma knife, compared to cold dissection and bipolar electrocautery (p<0.05). Less postoperative pain was observed with plasma knife compared to bipolar electrocautery but more postoperative pain was observed with both compared to CDT (p<0.05). Postoperative healing time was longer with plasma knife and bipolar electrocautery, compared to cold dissection (p<0.05). Plasma knife is a useful and safe device in tonsillectomy. Its use reduces intraoperative blood loss and provides a fast tonsillectomy with acceptable morbidity.
    International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology 06/2009; 73(9):1195-8. · 0.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the frequently encountered micro-organisms in the aerodigestive tract. Although infections caused by H. pylori are this common, the exact mode of transmission has not been fully understood yet. Oral-oral, fecal-oral and gastrointestinal-oral routes are the possible modes of transmission. This infection is usually acquired in childhood and may persist for the whole life of the patient. However, about 80% of the infected humans are asymptomatic. Human stomach was considered to be the only reservoir of H. pylori until bacteria were discovered in human dental plaque, in oral lesions, in saliva, in tonsil and adenoid tissue. It is suggested that H. pylori enters the nasopharyngeal cavity by gastroesophageal reflux and colonize in the dental plaques, adenoid tissues and tonsils. From these localizations, the bacteria ascend to the middle ear and to the paranasal sinuses directly or by the reflux again and may trigger some diseases, including otitis, sinusitis, phyrangitis, laryngitis and glossitis. But still, the exact mechanism remains unclear.
    Journal of the National Medical Association 11/2008; 100(10):1224-30. · 0.91 Impact Factor
  • The Laryngoscope 11/2005; 115(10):1898; author reply 1898. · 1.98 Impact Factor
  • Acta Oto-Laryngologica 01/2005; 124(10):1240. · 1.11 Impact Factor
  • Respirology 09/2004; 9(3):423; author reply 424. · 2.78 Impact Factor
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 08/2004; 93(1):104; author reply 104. · 3.45 Impact Factor