M Grayon

Agence Française de Sécurité Sanitaire des Produits de Santé, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (52)116.38 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Short-sequence-repeat (SSR) sequencing was applied to 127 Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates typed by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and IS900 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Combined MIRU-VNTR and SSR typing followed by secondary IS900 RFLP typing is an improved approach to high-resolution genotyping of this pathogen.
    Journal of clinical microbiology 11/2008; 46(12):4091-4. · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An evaluation of a multiplex PCR assay (Bruce-ladder) was performed in seven laboratories using 625 Brucella strains from different animal and geographical origins. This robust test can differentiate in a single step all of the classical Brucella species, including those found in marine mammals and the S19, RB51, and Rev.1 vaccine strains.
    Journal of clinical microbiology 09/2008; 46(10):3484-7. · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many non-tuberculous mycobacteria synthesize abundant glycopeptidolipids (GPLs). These surface-located GPLs are involved in pathogenicity by interfering with the host immune system. In Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (Mav), GPLs consist of a lipopeptide core composed of a tetrapeptide O-linked to mono- and oligo-saccharides. The biosynthesis pathway of the simplest GPLs is now relatively well understood and involves probably more than fifteen genes. Whereas it is very obvious that most, if not all, of the Mav isolates produce GPLs, the picture is not as clear for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map), the etiologic agent of Johne's disease in cattle, and several conflicting data have been produced. Biochemical analysis of a large set of characterized Map isolates showed that all Map strains tested produce a lipopentapeptide (L5P) instead of GPLs. To provide a genomic basis for the synthesis of this compound, the recently published genome sequence of Map was explored using in silico methods. Even though Map produces a lipopeptide rather than GPL, its genome contains nevertheless a locus highly similar to the GPL biosynthetic pathway of Mav. We showed that the module composition of the non-ribosomal protein synthase (Nrp) of Map, the enzyme involved in the synthesis of the peptidyl moiety, is dramatically different from that of other GPL producers such as M. smegmatis (Ms) and Mav and is in agreement with the amino acid content of the L5P. We also showed that the peptidyl moiety of the L5P is a target for a strong specific humoral response in Map infected animals. These genomic and biochemical differences may help to unambiguously distinguish Map from Mav and also from M. bovis, to reclassify related strains of the Map species and to allow the convenient and specific diagnosis of paratuberculosis.
    Vaccine 02/2008; 26(2):257-68. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the etiological agent of paratuberculosis, affects a wide range of domestic ruminants and has been suggested to be involved in Crohn's disease in humans. Most available methods for identifying and differentiating strains of this difficult species are technically demanding and have limited discriminatory power. Here, we report the identification of novel PCR-based typing markers consisting of variable-number tandem repeats (VNTRs) of genetic elements called mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRUs). Eight markers were applied to 183 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates from bovine, caprine, ovine, cervine, leporine, and human origins from 10 different countries and to 82 human isolates of the closely related species M. avium from France. Among the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates, 21 patterns were found by MIRU-VNTR typing, with a discriminatory index of 0.751. The predominant R01 IS900 restriction fragment length polymorphism type, comprising 131 isolates, was divided into 15 MIRU-VNTR types. Among the 82 M. avium isolates, the eight MIRU-VNTR loci distinguished 30 types, none of which was shared by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates, resulting in a discriminatory index of 0.889. Our results suggest that MIRU-VNTR typing is a fast typing method that, in combination with other methods, might prove to be optimal for PCR-based molecular epidemiological studies of M. avium/M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis pathogens. In addition, presumably identical M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis 316F vaccine strains originating from the Weybridge laboratory and from different commercial batches from Mérial actually differed by one or both typing methods. These results indicate a substantial degree of genetic drift among different vaccine preparations, which has important implications for prophylactic approaches.
    Journal of Clinical Microbiology 09/2007; 45(8):2404-10. · 4.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Since the 1990s, Brucella strains not matching the characteristics of any of the six conventional species have been isolated worldwide from marine mammals. In this study, 31 Brucella strains isolated from various marine mammals were examined for their oxidative metabolic pattern on 12 amino-acid and carbohydrate substrates. Three main oxidative profiles different from those of the Brucella terrestrial mammal strains were identified for the marine mammal strains: one gathering strains isolated from pinnipeds and two gathering strains from cetaceans. Thus, both oxidative metabolism results and previous molecular studies are in agreement with the proposal of two new Brucella species, Brucella pinnipediae and Brucella cetaceae, to classify the Brucella strains isolated from marine mammals, and are also in accordance with a classification of species of the Brucella genus based on host preference.
    FEMS Microbiology Letters 06/2007; 270(2):245-9. · 2.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human brucellosis is still the most common bacterial zoonosis worldwide. Neither well-known molecular tools nor the classical biotyping methods are satisfactory for subtyping of Brucella spp. Loci containing Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTRs) have recently proved their usefulness in typing strains from animal origin despite the high genetic homogeneity within the genus Brucella (DNA-DNA homology >90%). The aim of this study was to evaluate MLVA (Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis) for diagnostic and epidemiological use in human brucellosis. One hundred and twenty-eight B. melitensis isolates of all three biovars were typed using eight minisatellite (panel 1) and eight microsatellite (panel 2) markers. One hundred and ten different genotypes were identified. The MLVA clustering pattern correlated with the geographic origin of the strains. Brucella strains isolated from different patients within the same outbreak or from the same patient before first-line therapy and after relapse showed identical genotypes. Fuchsin sensitive B. melitensis strains were found in closely related clusters giving evidence for an association between VNTRs and some phenotypic characteristics. However, the validity of biovars established by classical microbiological methods could not be confirmed by MLVA clustering. The original data can be queried on the genotyping web page at http://bacterial-genotyping.igmors.u-psud.fr. The MLVA assay is rapid, highly discriminatory, and reproducible within human Brucella isolates. MLVA can significantly contribute to epidemiological trace-back analysis of Brucella infections and may advance surveillance and control of human brucellosis.
    Journal of Microbiological Methods 04/2007; 69(1):137-45. · 2.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces heparin-binding hemagglutinin (TB-HBHA), an adhesin involved in binding to non-professional phagocytes and in extrapulmonary dissemination. TB-HBHA binds sulphated glycoconjugates through its C-terminal lysine-rich domain and can be purified by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. Homologues of HBHA are found in other pathogenic mycobacteria, but previous investigations failed to demonstrate them in non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis. We identified a gene encoding a HBHA-like protein, named MS-HBHA, from the complete M. smegmatis genome. The deduced MS-HBHA amino acid sequence revealed 68% identity with that of TB-HBHA and contains lysine-rich repeats in its C-terminal domain. However, in contrast to TB-HBHA, the lysine-rich domain of MS-HBHA is preceded by a stretch of acidic residues. This difference likely explains the low affinity for heparin displayed by MS-HBHA compared to TB-HBHA. Isolation by heparin-Sepharose chromatography procedure and mass spectrometry analysis indicated that MS-HBHA, similar to TB-HBHA contains several methylated lysine residues in its C-terminal domain. Although MS-HBHA is associated with M. smegmatis cell wall fractions, it does not seem to play a role in epithelial adherence and its function remains unknown. We therefore conclude that TB-HBHA may have evolved as an adhesin in pathogenic mycobacteria from a homolog that serves a different function in a saprophytic mycobacterium.
    Microbes and Infection 03/2007; 9(2):175-82. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The commonly used live attenuated vaccine in ovine brucellosis prophylaxis is Brucella melitensis Rev.1. This vaccine is known to induce antibody responses in vaccinated animals indistinguishable by the current conventional serological tests from those observed in challenged animals. Brucella BP26 and Omp31 proteins have shown an interesting potential as diagnostic antigens for ovine brucellosis. Accordingly, the bp26 gene and both bp26 and omp31 genes have been deleted from the vaccine strain Rev.1. Immunogenicity and vaccine efficacy of the parental Rev.1 strain and of both mutants in protecting sheep against B. melitensis strain H38 challenge was evaluated by clinical and bacteriological examination of ewes. They were conjunctivally or subcutaneously vaccinated when 4 months old and then challenged with B. melitensis H38 at the middle of the first pregnancy following vaccination. Deletion of bp26 and omp31 genes did not significantly affect the well recognised capacity of Rev.1 to protect sheep against B. melitensis challenge. However, the protection conferred by the CGV2631 mutant was significantly lower than that conferred by the CGV26 mutant or the Rev.1 strain. Vaccinated and challenged animals were detected positive in classical serological tests and in the IFN-gamma assay. A BP26-based ELISA was investigated to discriminate between ewes vaccinated by the mutants and ewes challenged with B. melitensis H38. The cut-off which was chosen in order to have 100% specificity resulted in a moderate sensitivity for the detection of challenged ewes. The use in the field of one of the mutants as vaccine against a B. melitensis infection, combined with classic diagnostic tests and a BP26 ELISA, could thus give an improvement in the differentiation between vaccinated and infected animals and contribute to the objective of eradication of brucellosis in small ruminants.
    Vaccine 02/2007; 25(5):794-805. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Swine brucellosis is caused by the biovars 1, 2 and 3 of Brucella suis the identification of which up to now relies on microbiological tests lacking adequate specificity together with time consuming and expensive molecular procedures. Based on sequence variation of the omp2b gene, we have developed a four primer set multiplex PCR assay that was tested for polymorphism analysis of B. suis biovars causing brucellosis in swine. The assay exploits the single nucleotide polymorphisms found in omp2b gene of B. suis reference biovars which are conserved in 43 B. suis field isolates from different geographic origins and hosts. Three specific amplification patterns (S1, S2 and S3) were obtained for reference strains of B. suis biovars 1, 2 and 3, respectively. However, some B. suis field isolates identified as biovars 2 or 3 according AMOS-PCR, PCR-RFLP of omp31 and omp2 genes and classical bacteriological methods, resulted also in S1 patterns, limiting the typing usefulness of the method.
    Veterinary Microbiology 07/2006; 115(1-3):269-77. · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Brucella melitensis is highly pathogenic and constitutes a serious risk to public health. In Argentina, biovar 1 has been isolated from infected animals, but the Rev.1 strain vaccine is not authorised for use. This report describes nine atypical B. melitensis isolates obtained from humans. These isolates grew slowly, produced small colonies and were susceptible to penicillin and dyes, similar to the B. melitensis Rev.1 vaccine strain, but were inhibited by streptomycin 2.5 mg/L. The isolation of such atypical B. melitensis variants has never been reported from animals in Argentina, and could indicate the emergence of a new mutant variant.
    Clinical Microbiology and Infection 07/2006; 12(6):593-6. · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The classification of Brucella into species and biovars relies on phenotypic characteristics and sometimes raises difficulties in the interpretation of the results due to an absence of standardization of the typing reagents. In addition, the resolution of this biotyping is moderate and requires the manipulation of the living agent. More efficient DNA-based methods are needed, and this work explores the suitability of multiple locus variable number tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) for both typing and species identification. Eighty tandem repeat loci predicted to be polymorphic by genome sequence analysis of three available Brucella genome sequences were tested for polymorphism by genotyping 21 Brucella strains (18 reference strains representing the six 'classical' species and all biovars as well as 3 marine mammal strains currently recognized as members of two new species). The MLVA data efficiently cluster the strains as expected according to their species and biovar. For practical use, a subset of 15 loci preserving this clustering was selected and applied to the typing of 236 isolates. Using this MLVA-15 assay, the clusters generated correspond to the classical biotyping scheme of Brucella spp. The 15 markers have been divided into two groups, one comprising 8 user-friendly minisatellite markers with a good species identification capability (panel 1) and another complementary group of 7 microsatellite markers with higher discriminatory power (panel 2). The MLVA-15 assay can be applied to large collections of Brucella strains with automated or manual procedures, and can be proposed as a complement, or even a substitute, of classical biotyping methods. This is facilitated by the fact that MLVA is based on non-infectious material (DNA) whereas the biotyping procedure itself requires the manipulation of the living agent. The data produced can be queried on a dedicated MLVA web service site.
    BMC Microbiology 02/2006; 6:9. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The live attenuated Brucella melitensis Rev.1 strain is considered the best vaccine available for the prophylaxis of brucellosis in sheep caused by either B. melitensis or Brucella ovis. However, its application stimulates antibody responses in vaccinated animals indistinguishable by the current conventional serological tests from those observed in infected animals. The periplasmic protein BP26 and the outer membrane protein (OMP) Omp31 are immunodominant antigens in the serological responses of B. melitensis and B. ovis infected sheep, respectively. Accordingly, vaccine strain Rev.1 single and double deletion mutants of the bp26 and omp31 genes were developed, based on the principle that the use of such mutants as vaccines in association with diagnostic tests based on BP26 and Omp31 antigens would allow the serological differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals. The deletion mutants obtained were indistinguishable from the parental Rev.1 strain by conventional bacteriological and typing tests. The expression of their major surface antigens, as determined by reactivity with specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), remained unaffected, i.e. smooth-lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS) and OMPs besides in the expression of the antigens whose respective genes were deleted. The bp26 and omp31 deletions did not modify the kinetics of splenic infection nor the residual virulence of Rev.1 in the BALB/c mouse model. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with the deletion mutants conferred significant protective immunity against B. melitensis strain H38 or B. ovis strain PA challenges, to the same extent as that induced by parental Rev.1 strain. Thus, these Rev.1 bp26 or omp31 deletion mutants are promising vaccine candidates against B. melitensis and B. ovis infections and will be further evaluated in sheep.
    Vaccine 08/2004; 22(21-22):2827-35. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sequencing of bp26, the gene encoding the Brucella sp. immunogenic BP26 periplasmic protein, was performed in the reference strains of Brucella abortus, B. suis, and B. ovis. The three bp26 sequences were almost identical to that published for B. melitensis 16M bp26, and only minor nucleotide substitutions, without modifying the amino acid sequence, were observed between species. The bp26 genes of the seven B. abortus biovar reference strains and B. abortus S19 and RB51 vaccine strains were also sequenced. Again, only minor differences were found. Surprisingly, the bp26 nucleotide sequence for B. abortus S19 was almost identical to that found for B. melitensis 16M and differed from the sequence described previously by others (O. L. Rossetti, A. I. Arese, M. L. Boschiroli, and S. L. Cravero, J. Clin. Microbiol. 34:165-169, 1996) for the same B. abortus strain. The epitope mapping of BP26, performed by using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and recombinant DNA techniques, allowed the identification of an immunodominant region of the protein interesting for the diagnosis of B. melitensis and B. ovis infection in sheep. A recombinant fusion protein containing this region of BP26 reacted indeed, in Western blotting, as the entire recombinant BP26 against sera from B. melitensis- or B. ovis-infected sheep while it avoided false-positive reactions observed with sera from Brucella-free sheep when using the entire recombinant BP26. Thus, use of this recombinant fusion protein instead the entire recombinant BP26 could improve the specific serological diagnosis of B. melitensis or B. ovis infection in sheep.
    Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology 08/2003; 10(4):647-51. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Brucella strains have been isolated since the 1990s from a wide variety of marine mammals and represent potential zoonotic pathogens. They have distinctive phenotypic and molecular characteristics from the terrestrial mammal Brucella species, and two new species names have been previously proposed based on DNA polymorphism at the omp2 locus and their preferential host, i.e. Brucella cetaceae for cetacean isolates and Brucella pinnipediae for pinniped isolates. The results presented in this study on characterization of these strains by infrequent restriction site-PCR (IRS-PCR), taking into account the higher number of IS711 elements in their genome compared to terrestrial mammal Brucella species, supports this classification. The nucleotide sequences of specific DNA fragments detected by IRS-PCR were determined and used to develop PCR identification tests for either B. cetaceae or B. pinnipediae.
    Microbes and Infection 07/2003; 5(7):593-602. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Smooth lipopolysaccharides (S-LPSs) from Brucella strains isolated from seals, dolphins, porpoises, an otter and a minke whale were characterized by ELISA using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against seven previously defined O-polysaccharide (O-PS) epitopes and by Western blot after SDS-PAGE. All strains studied were A-dominant as shown by specific polyclonal sera and this was also confirmed by the mAbs. However, binding patterns in ELISA of mAbs to the specific common (C) epitopes were rather heterogeneous, and for some strains, such as those isolated from striped dolphins, binding of these mAbs was much reduced or negative as had previously been shown for Brucella suis biovar 2 strains. Western blot after SDS-PAGE showed the typical A-dominant strain banding pattern for all marine mammal Brucella isolates, but the average S-LPS size was shorter in many of these compared to reference Brucella abortus strain 544. Thus, S-LPSs of the marine mammal isolates show heterogeneity with regard to their O-PS C epitope content and their average size.
    Research in Microbiology 07/2002; 153(5):277-80. · 2.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The live attenuated strain B. melitensis Rev.1 is considered the best vaccine available for the prophylaxis of brucellosis in sheep and goats. The Rev.1 vaccine was obtained in the 1950s by a two-step selection involving firstly streptomycin resistance and dependence and secondly reversion of dependence but keeping streptomycin resistance. Chromosomally acquired streptomycin resistance is frequently due to mutations in the gene encoding the ribosomal protein S12, rpsL. Nucleotide sequencing revealed one mutation in the rpsL gene of vaccine strain Rev.1 compared to that of reference strain 16M leading to an amino acid Pro-to-Leu change at codon position 91 (Pro91Leu). This mutation resulted also in the lack of a NciI restriction site in the gene. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using NciI applied to a large number of Brucella reference and field strains showed that the mutation detected was specific of vaccine strain Rev.1.
    Vaccine 07/2002; 20(19-20):2546-50. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Omp2a and Omp2b are highly homologous porins present in the outer membrane of the bacteria from the genus Brucella, a facultative intracellular pathogen. The genes coding for these proteins are closely linked in the Brucella genome and oriented in opposite directions. In this work, we present the cloning, purification, and characterization of four Omp2b size variants found in various Brucella species, and we compare their antigenic and functional properties to the Omp2a and Omp2b porins of Brucella melitensis reference strain 16M. The variation of the Omp2a and Omp2b porin sequences among the various strains of the genus Brucella seems to result mostly from multiple gene conversions between the two highly homologous genes. As shown in this study, this phenomenon has led to the creation of natural Omp2a and Omp2b chimeric proteins in Omp2b porin size variants. The comparison by liposome swelling assay of the porins sugar permeability suggested a possible functional differences between Omp2a and Omp2b, with Omp2a showing a more efficient pore in sugar diffusion. The sequence variability in the Omp2b size variants was located in the predicted external loops of the porin. Several epitopes recognized by anti-Omp2b monoclonal antibodies were mapped by comparison of the Omp2b size variants antigenicity, and two of them were located in the most exposed surface loops. However, since variations are mostly driven by simple exchanges of conserved motifs between the two genes (except for an Omp2b version from an atypical strain of Brucella suis biovar 3), the porin variability does not result in major antigenic variability of the Brucella surface that could help the bacteria during the reinfection of a host. Porin variation in Brucella seems to result mainly in porin conductivity modifications.
    Journal of Bacteriology 09/2001; 183(16):4839-47. · 3.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A number of recent reports have described the isolation and characterization of Brucella strains from a wide variety of marine mammals such as seals, porpoises, dolphins and a minke whale. These strains were identified as brucellae by conventional typing tests. However, their overall characteristics were not assimilable to those of any of the six currently recognized Brucella species and it was suggested that they comprise a new nomen species to be called Brucella maris. In the present study we analysed DNA polymorphism at the omp2 locus of 33 marine mammal Brucella strains isolated from seals, dolphins, porpoises and an otter. The omp2 locus contains two gene copies (named omp2a and omp2b) coding for porin proteins and has been found particularly useful for molecular typing and identification of Brucella at the species, biovar, or strain level. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and DNA sequencing showed that strains isolated from dolphins and porpoises carry two omp2b gene copies instead of one omp2a and one omp2b gene copy or two similar omp2a gene copies reported in the currently recognized species. This observation was also recently made for a minke whale Brucella isolate. The otter and all seal isolates except one were shown to carry one omp2a and one omp2b gene copy as encountered in isolates from terrestrial mammals. By PCR-RFLP of the omp2b gene, a specific marker was detected grouping the marine mammal Brucella isolates. Although marine mammal Brucella isolates may represent a separate group from terrestrial mammal isolates based on omp2b sequence constructed phylogenetic trees, the divergence found between their omp2b and also between their omp2a nucleotide sequences indicates that they form a more heterogeneous group than isolates from terrestrial mammals. Therefore, grouping the marine mammal Brucella isolates into one species Brucella maris seems inappropriate unless the currently recognized Brucella species are grouped. With respect to the current classification of brucellae according to the preferential host, brucellae isolated from such diverse marine mammal species as seals and dolphins could actually comprise more than one species, and at least two new species, B. pinnipediae and B. cetaceae, could be compatible with the classical criteria of host preferentialism and DNA polymorphism at their omp2 locus.
    Microbes and Infection 08/2001; 3(9):729-38. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: DNA-DNA hybridization showed that the Brucella strains recently isolated from marine mammals belong to the monospecific genus Brucella (more than 77% DNA relatedness). Ribotyping (HindIII rDNA restriction patterns) showed that they may represent a separate subgroup (marine type) specifically associated with marine mammals.
    Research in Microbiology 12/2000; 151(9):797-9. · 2.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: DNA polymorphism of the bp26 gene, coding for a diagnostic protein antigen for brucellosis, was assessed by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis using primers to amplify the bp26 gene with its flanking regions. Surprisingly, whereas PCR performed on DNA of the reference strains of the six recognized Brucella species produced a product of the expected size (1,029 bp), PCR performed on DNA of three representative strains from marine mammals (from a seal, a dolphin, and a porpoise) produced a larger product, of about 1,900 bp. Nucleotide sequencing of the 1,900-bp PCR products revealed the presence of an insertion sequence, IS711, downstream of the bp26 gene and adjacent to a Bru-RS1 element previously described as being a hot spot for IS711 insertion. PCR performed on a large number of field strains from different geographic origins and from marine mammal isolates indicated that the occurrence of an IS711 element downstream of the bp26 gene was a feature specific to the marine mammal Brucella strains. Thus, this PCR assay is able to differentiate Brucella terrestrial isolates from marine mammal isolates and could be applied for diagnostic purposes.
    Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology 10/2000; 7(5):835-9. · 2.51 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
116.38 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007
    • Agence Française de Sécurité Sanitaire des Produits de Santé
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1995–2006
    • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
      • Centre de Recherche de Tours
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1997
    • National University of Central Buenos Aires
      Тандиль, Buenos Aires, Argentina