Lyne Messier

Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Are you Lyne Messier?

Claim your profile

Publications (14)42.76 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The problems of obesity and depression in type 2 diabetes mellitus are well documented, yet the role of weight cycling in relation to these 2 chronic conditions has not been examined. The study objective was to determine whether weight cycling predicts the development of depressive symptoms in the course of 1 year.
    Canadian Journal of Diabetes 07/2014; · 0.46 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The study purpose was to examine the association between changes in depressive symptoms and changes in lifestyle-related indicators among adults with type 2 diabetes. A longitudinal survey was conducted among individuals with type 2 diabetes in Quebec. The sample consisted of 1183 subjects who responded to the baseline and 1-year follow-up telephone interviews, with complete data for depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire 9). Regression models were used to determine associations between changes in depressive symptoms and changes in lifestyle-related indicators (physical activity, body mass index (BMI)) and, perception-related indicators (control of body weight and of amount of food eaten). After 1 year, 136 subjects (11.5%) developed depression (major or minor), 118 (10%) remained depressed, 829 (70%) remained not depressed and 100 (8.5%) reverted to not depressed. Subjects who developed depression, compared with those who remained not depressed, were more likely to be inactive at baseline, remain inactive at 1 year, report a worsening of their perception of controlling body weight, report maintaining a poor perception of controlling amount of food eaten and report maintaining a poor perception of controlling body weight (p<0.05). The same factors were associated with maintenance of depression at 1 year (p<0.05). Changes in BMI were not associated with changes in depressive symptoms. Physical inactivity, perception of poor control of body weight and amount of food eaten have been found to be associated prospectively with the development and persistence of depression and, therefore, should be considered priority targets for diabetes treatment. Depression is related to the continuation of poor lifestyle and perception-related indicators.
    Canadian Journal of Diabetes 08/2013; 37(4):243-8. · 0.46 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite the detrimental effects of smoking on their health, a high number of adults with Type 2 diabetes continue to smoke. Identifying distinct types of smokers within this population could help tailor and target intervention programmes. This study examined whether smokers with Type 2 diabetes could be classified into different profiles based on smoking habits, socio-economic characteristics and lifestyle factors. A sample of adults with self-reported diabetes was selected from random-digit dialing. Analyses included 383 participants with Type 2 diabetes who were current smokers. Information related to smoking, socio-economic status, health and lifestyle was collected by phone interview at baseline and 1 year later. Latent class analysis was used to identify subgroups of smokers. We uncovered three meaningful classes of smokers: class 1, long-time smokers with long-standing diabetes (n = 105); class 2, heavy smokers with deprived socio-economic status, poor health and unhealthy lifestyle characteristics (n = 105); class 3, working and active smokers who were more recently diagnosed with diabetes (n = 173). Members of class 2 were significantly more likely to be disabled and depressed at baseline and 1 year later compared with other classes. Different profiles of smokers exist among adults with Type 2 diabetes, each suggesting different cessation treatment needs. Distinguishing between these types of smokers may enable clinicians to tailor their approach to smoking cessation.
    Diabetic Medicine 10/2011; 29(5):586-92. · 3.24 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of diabetes in Canada is increasing. Multiple factors have been identified in the development of disability in diabetic patients, but the interaction of those risk factors is not clear. The purpose of this paper was to assess the association between diabetes severity, health behavior, socioeconomic status, social support, depression, and disability simultaneously in a population-based study of individuals with diabetes in Quebec, Canada. Random digit dialing was used to select a sample of 2,003 adults with self-reported diabetes in Quebec. Health status was assessed by the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II and the CDC Healthy Days Measures. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was used to assess depression. Potential risk factors included diabetes severity, social support, socioeconomic status, and health behavior factors. Structural equation models were used to identify risk factors that contributed to both depressive symptoms and disability. The prevalence of major and minor depression was 8.7% and 10.9%, respectively, while the prevalence of severe disability was 6.7%. Diabetes severity and health behavior factors were associated with both depression and disability. Social support was associated with depression for women but not for men. Our results suggest a complex interaction between health behavior factors, diabetes severity, social support, depression, and disability. Behavioral factors and diabetes-specific factors might have a direct effect on both depression and physical functioning.
    Psychosomatics 01/2011; 52(2):167-77. · 1.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chronic subclinical inflammation and regular physical activity have opposing relationships to obesity-related metabolic diseases. Yet, the association between chronic inflammation and physical activity has rarely been examined in obese subjects. We examined the association between physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE), total (TEE) and resting energy expenditure (REE) and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO(2)peak) with inflammatory markers in overweight/obese women. Cross-sectional study. The study included 152 overweight/obese postmenopausal women who were sedentary and free of chronic/inflammatory diseases (mean age: 57.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 56.7-58.3) years, body mass index (BMI): 32.5 (95% CI 31.8-33.2) kg m(-2)). The following parameters were measured: TEE (doubly labeled water), REE (indirect calorimetry), PAEE (as (TEE x 0.90)-REE), VO(2)peak (ergocycle) and serum high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), haptoglobin, soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor 1 (sTNFR1), interleukin-6, orosomucoid and white blood cells. Sedentary women with the highest tertile of PAEE (1276 (1233-1319) kcal day(-1)) had lower concentrations of hsCRP and haptoglobin than those in the lowest tertile (587 (553-621) kcal day(-1)) after adjustment for fat mass (P<0.05). Soluble TNFR1 was positively correlated with VO(2)peak, TEE and REE (P<0.05), and hsCRP and orosomucoid were positively associated with REE (P<0.01), whereas haptoglobin was negatively associated with PAEE (P<0.05). In stepwise regression analyses that examined the concomitant associations of components of energy expenditure with inflammatory markers, PAEE remained the only predictor of hsCRP and haptoglobin (P<0.05), explaining 14 and 5%, respectively, of their variation,whereas REE was the only predictor of orosomucoid (r (2) = 0.05, P = 0.02) after adjustment for fat mass. Adding leptin to the regression models results in similar relationships between inflammatory markers and components of energy expenditure. PAEE is an independent predictor of hsCRP and haptoglobin in sedentary overweight/obese postmenopausal women free of chronic disease. Our data support the role of physical activity in reducing subclinical inflammation and risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.
    International journal of obesity (2005) 04/2010; 34(9):1387-95. · 5.22 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Large inter-individual variations exist in changes in inflammation and insulin resistance (IR) in response to hypocaloric-interventions in obese subjects that are not explained by weight-loss per se. We identified the number of serum apoB-lipoproteins (serum apoB) as the primary predictor of inflammatory markers in post-menopausal overweight/obese women. As apoB-lipoproteins are related to inflammation and inflammation promotes IR, we hypothesized that the reduction in inflammation and IR following hypocaloric-interventions is associated with the reduction in serum apoB. After a 6-month hypocaloric-dietary-intervention in 56 overweight/obese post-menopausal women, there was a significant reduction in weight, total, subcutaneous abdominal and visceral abdominal fat mass, apoB, Lp(a), hsCRP, orosomucoid, haptoglobin and IR (increased M(clamp)) and an increase in LDL-C/apoB ratio. In regression analysis, % change in apoB was the primary predictor of % changes in hsCRP (R(2)=0.22), orosomucoid (R(2)=0.35), haptoglobin (R(2)=0.43) and M(clamp) (R(2)=0.17). When the study population was split around baseline median apoB (0.97g/L), women who were above median apoB (N=27) had significant reduction in apoB (-17%), hsCRP (-24%), orosomucoid (-8%), haptoglobin (-18%) and IR (M(clamp) +14%). On the other hand, women below median apoB (N=29) had no significant changes in these parameters despite equivalent reduction in weight and fat depots in the two groups. Reduction in apoB associated strongly and independently with the reduction in inflammatory markers and IR following a hypocaloric-diet in overweight/obese women. We hypothesize that the elevated apoB phenotype may be key therapeutic target to reduce obesity-associated inflammation and IR maximally by hypocaloric-dietary-interventions.
    Atherosclerosis 04/2010; 211(2):682-8. · 3.71 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of the present study was to examine anthropometric, metabolic, psychosocial and dietary factors associated with dropout in a 6-month weight loss intervention aimed at reducing body weight by 10 %. The study sample included 137 sedentary, overweight and obese postmenopausal women, participating in a weight loss intervention that consisted of either energy restriction (ER) or ER with resistance training (ER+RT). Anthropometric (BMI, percent lean body mass, percent fat mass, visceral adipose tissue and waist circumference), metabolic (total energy expenditure, RMR, insulin sensitivity and fasting plasma levels of leptin and ghrelin), psychosocial (body esteem, self-esteem, stress, dietary restraint, disinhibition, hunger, quality of life, self-efficacy, perceived benefits for controlling weight and perceived risk) and dietary (3-d food record) variables were measured. Thirty subjects out of 137 dropped out of the weight loss programme (22 %), with no significant differences in dropout rates between those in the ER and the ER+RT groups. Overall, amount of weight loss was significantly lower in dropouts than in completers ( - 1.7 (sd 3.5) v. - 5.6 (sd 4.3) kg, P < 0.05); weekly weight loss during the first 4 weeks was also significantly lower. Dropouts consumed fewer fruit servings than completers (1.7 (sd 1.1) v. 2.7 (sd 1.53), P < 0.05) and had higher insulin sensitivity levels (12.6 (sd 3.8) v. 11.1 (sd 2.8) mg glucose/min per kg fat-free mass, P < 0.05). The present results suggest that the rate of weight loss during the first weeks of an intervention plays an important role in the completion of the programme. Thus, participants with low rates of initial weight loss should be monitored intensely to undertake corrective measures to increase the likelihood of completion.
    The British journal of nutrition 11/2009; 103(8):1230-5. · 3.45 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of the present study was to analyze the association between neighborhood deprivation and self-reported disability in a community sample of people with type 2 diabetes. Random digit dialing was used to select a sample of adults with self-reported diabetes aged 18-80 years in Quebec, Canada. Health status was assessed by the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II. Material and social deprivation was measured using the Pampalon index, which is based on the Canadian Census. Potential risk factors for disability included sociodemographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, social support, lifestyle-related factors (smoking, physical activity, and BMI), health care-related problems, duration of diabetes, insulin use, and diabetes-specific complications. There was a strong association between disability and material and social deprivation in our sample (n = 1,439): participants living in advantaged neighborhoods had lower levels of disability than participants living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. The means +/- SD disability scores for men were 7.8 +/- 11.8, 12.0 +/- 11.8, and 18.1 +/- 19.4 for low, medium, and high deprivation areas, respectively (P < 0.001). The disability scores for women were 13.4 +/- 12.4, 14.8 +/- 15.9, and 18.9 +/- 16.2 for low, medium, and high deprivation areas, respectively (P < 0.01). Neighborhood deprivation was associated with disability even after controlling for education, household income, sociodemographic characteristics, race, lifestyle-related behaviors, social support, diabetes-related variables, and health care access problems. The inclusion of neighborhood characteristics might be an important step in the identification and interpretation of risk factors for disability in diabetes.
    Diabetes care 09/2009; 32(11):1998-2004. · 7.74 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Characteristics of weight cyclers have not been fully assessed. The objective of this study was to determine the anthropometric, metabolic, psychosocial, and dietary profile of postmenopausal women according to weight-cycling history, defined as the frequency of going on a diet and losing >10 kg: never (0 times), low (1 time), moderate (2 to 3 times), or frequent (> or = 4 times). The sample of this cross-sectional study consisted of 121 overweight/obese postmenopausal women enrolled in a 6-month randomized weight-loss intervention between 2003 and 2006. Measures at baseline were used to evaluate body composition (fat mass by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and visceral fat by computed tomography); resting metabolic rate by indirect calorimetry; insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp; fasting plasma levels of glucose, lipids, leptin, ghrelin, and adiponectin; blood pressure; psychosocial profile (eg, body-esteem, self-esteem, stress, perceived risks, perceived benefits, self-efficacy, quality of life, dietary restraint, disinhibition, hunger); and dietary profile (3-day food record). Differences among groups of weight cyclers were determined using analyses of variance. Among the 121 women, 15.7%, 24.8%, 33.9%, and 25.6% were non-, low, moderate, and frequent cyclers, respectively. Frequent cyclers were characterized by higher body mass index (calculated as kg/m(2)) (current and at 25 years of age) and percent body fat mass, larger waist circumference, and lower resting metabolic rate/kg body weight than noncyclers (P<0.05); and moderate cyclers had lower plasma adiponectin values than noncyclers (P<0.05). For psychosocial measures, frequent cyclers were characterized by greater disinhibition and lower body esteem after controlling for body mass index (P<0.05). In conclusion, weight cycling was found to be associated with some unfavorable metabolic and psychosocial parameters.
    Journal of the American Dietetic Association 05/2009; 109(4):718-24. · 3.80 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Diabetes & Metabolism - DIABETES METAB. 01/2009; 35(3):239-240.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the psychosocial correlates of cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak) and muscle strength in overweight and obese sedentary post-menopausal women. The study population consisted of 137 non-diabetic, sedentary overweight and obese post-menopausal women (mean age 57.7 years, s = 4.8; body mass index 32.4 kg.m(-2), s = 4.6). At baseline we measured: (1) body composition using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; (2) visceral fat using computed tomography; (3) insulin sensitivity using the hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp; (4) cardiorespiratory fitness; (5) muscle strength using the leg press exercise; and (6) psychosocial profile (quality of life, perceived stress, self-esteem, body-esteem, and perceived risk for developing chronic diseases) using validated questionnaires. Both VO2peak and muscle strength were significantly correlated with quality of life (r = 0.29, P < 0.01 and r = 0.30, P < 0.01, respectively), and quality of life subscales for: physical functioning (r = 0.28, P < 0.01 and r = 0.22, P < 0.05, respectively), pain (r = 0.18, P < 0.05 and r = 0.23, P < 0.05, respectively), role functioning (r = 0.20, P < 0.05 and r = 0.24, P < 0.05, respectively), and perceived risks (r = -0.24, P < 0.01 and r = -0.30, P < 0.01, respectively). In addition, VO2peak was significantly associated with positive health perceptions, greater body esteem, and less time watching television/video. Stepwise regression analysis showed that quality of life for health perceptions and for role functioning were independent predictors of VO2peak and muscle strength, respectively. In conclusion, higher VO2peak and muscle strength are associated with a favourable psychosocial profile, and the psychosocial correlates of VO2peak were different from those of muscle strength. Furthermore, psychosocial factors could be predictors of VO2peak and muscle strength in our cohort of overweight and obese sedentary post-menopausal women.
    Journal of Sports Sciences 08/2008; 26(9):935-40. · 2.08 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between the triglyceride-HDL-cholesterol ratio (TG:HDL-C) and insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese sedentary postmenopausal women. The study population consisted of 131 non-diabetic overweight and obese sedentary postmenopausal women (age; 57.7+/-5.0 y; body mass index (BMI), 32.2+/-4.3 kg/m2). Subjects were characterized by dividing the entire cohort into tertiles based on the TG:HDL-C (T1<0.86 vs. T2=0.86 to 1.35 vs. T3>1.35, respectively). We measured (i) insulin sensitivity (using the hyperinsulinenic-euglycemic clamp and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)), (ii) body composition (using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), (iii) visceral fat (using computed tomography), (iv) plasma lipids, C-reactive protein, 2 h glucose concentration during an oral glucose tolerance test (2 h glucose), as well as fasting glucose and insulin, (v) peak oxygen consumption, and (vi) lower-body muscle strength (using weight training equipment). Significant correlations were observed between the TG:HDL-C and the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (r=-0.45; p<0.0001), as well as with HOMA (r=0.42; p<0.0001). Moreover, the TG:HDL-C significantly correlated with lean body mass, visceral fat, 2 h glucose, C-reactive protein, and muscle strength. Stepwise regression analysis showed that the TG:HDL-C explained 16.4% of the variation in glucose disposal in our cohort, which accounted for the greatest source of unique variance. Other independent predictors of glucose disposal were 2 h glucose (10.1%), C-reactive protein (CRP; 7.6%), and peak oxygen consumption (5.8%), collectively (including the TG:HDL-C) explaining 39.9% of the unique variance. In addition, the TG:HDL-C was the second predictor for HOMA, accounting for 11.7% of the variation. High levels of insulin sensitivity were associated with low levels of the TG:HDL-C. In addition, the TG:HDL-C was a predictor for glucose disposal rates and HOMA values in our cohort of overweight and obese postmenopausal women.
    Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism 12/2007; 32(6):1089-96. · 2.01 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to compare assessment of insulin sensitivity from hyperinsulinemic euglycaemic (HIEG) clamp with indexes derived from fasting and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Cross-sectional study with 107 sedentary non-diabetic overweight and obese postmenopausal (BMI=32.4+/-0.4 kg/m(2)) women undergoing both HIEG clamp and OGTT. Pairs of data were analyzed using Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman graphs analysis. Comparison between correlations was made using the method reported by Zar. All the indexes derived from either the OGTT or surrogate indexes were highly correlated with all the clamp-derived formulas (P<0.0001). However, HOMA and QUICKI were generally less correlated than OGTT-derived indexes. Analogically to QUICKI, we calculated a new formula derived from the OGTT measurements of glucose and insulin named simple index assessing insulin sensitivity (SI(is)OGTT)=1/[log(sum glucose t(0-30-90-120)) (mmol/l)+log(sum insulin t(0-30-90-120)) (microUI/ml)]. By using this formula, we found high significant correlations (r's=0.61-0.65; P<0.0001) with the clamp results. Moreover, the correlations of SI(is)OGTT with the clamp data were higher than for other previously published indexes. In that large group of non-diabetic overweight and obese postmenopausal women insulin sensitivity index derived from OGTT provided more accurate information than fasting based formula. We propose a new simple index for the assessment of insulin sensitivity from the OGTT data (SI(is)OGTT). The advantage of this new formula over all previously published OGTT-derived indexes of insulin sensitivity is that it is 1) easy to calculate 2) better correlated than other indexes of insulin sensitivity and 3) not affected by the way clamp results are expressed. Further studies are needed to validate SI(is)OGTT index in other populations.
    Diabetes & Metabolism 09/2007; 33(4):261-8. · 2.39 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Inflammation is implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes and CHD, but the trigger of inflammation is unclear. Although in vitro and animal studies support a role of elevated levels of atherosclerotic lipoproteins in the activation of inflammation, plasma cholesterol cannot predict inflammatory markers in humans. Moreover, the association between inflammatory markers and other traditional risk factors of diabetes and CHD is unclear. To increase our knowledge of in vivo regulation of inflammation, we examined the association between several traditional risk factors and inflammatory markers. We hypothesised that because apolipoprotein B (ApoB) reflects atherogenic particle number, it is the primary predictor of inflammatory status. We examined the association between several traditional risk factors and plasma high-sensitivity (hs) C-reactive protein (CRP), hsTNF-alpha, soluble TNF receptor 1, IL-6, orosomucoid, haptoglobin and alpha(1)-antitrypsin in 77 non-diabetic overweight and obese postmenopausal women. The inflammatory markers correlated positively with total and abdominal adiposity, blood pressure, 2-h OGTT glucose, insulin resistance, triglyceride, total/HDL cholesterol, ApoB, ApoB:apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) ratio and Framingham CHD risk points. They correlated negatively with ApoA1, and total, LDL and HDL cholesterol. ApoB was an independent predictor of the interindividual variation in IL-6, hsCRP, orosomucoid, haptoglobin and alpha(1)-antitrypsin (R (2) range 8-40%); other risk factors were less predictive. Compared with BMI-matched control subjects, women with hyperapobetalipoproteinaemia (hyperapoB) had higher hsTNF-alpha, IL-6, hsCRP and orosomucoid (increase 17-104%). ApoB is the primary predictor of inflammatory markers in postmenopausal overweight and obese women. Given elevated levels of inflammatory markers in hyperapoB women, we hypothesise that hyperapoB women may have an increased risk of developing both CHD and diabetes.
    Diabetologia 08/2006; 49(7):1637-46. · 6.49 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

127 Citations
42.76 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2014
    • Université de Montréal
      • Department of Nutrition
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2011
    • Centre de recherche du diabète de Montréal
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
    • McGill University
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2008
    • Université du Québec à Montréal
      • Department of Kinanthropology
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada