Ch Kouroussis

University Hospital of Heraklion, Irákleio, Attica, Greece

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Publications (31)69.74 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the docetaxel-gemcitabine (DG) combination administered every 2 weeks as salvage therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Thirty women with MBC who had disease progression after chemotherapy with anthracyclines, or anthracyclines and taxanes were treated with docetaxel 50 mg/m² and gemcitabine 1,500 mg/m² on days 1 and 14 in cycles of 28 days. All patients had received prior anthracyclines, and fourteen (46.6%) had also received prior taxanes. All patients were evaluable for toxicity and 24 for response to treatment. Complete response occurred in four (13.3%) patients and partial response in 10 (33.3%) for an overall response rate of 46.7% (95% CI 28.8-64.5). Seven patients (23.3%) had stable disease and nine (30%) progressive disease. Of the 14 patients previously treated with both anthracyclines and taxanes, seven (50%) responded. The median duration of response was 4.8 months (range 1.9-15.3), the median time to disease progression 6.6 months (range 0.5-16.9) and the median overall survival 16.8 months (range 1.3-53.2). There was no treatment-related toxic death. Neutropenia was the only grade 4 toxicity occurring in three (10%) patients. None of them developed neutropenic fever. Grade 3 thrombocytopenia occurred in two (6.7%) patients. Non-hematological toxicities were manageable. The DG combination administered biweekly is very well tolerated and effective in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated patients with MBC. A previous treatment with taxanes does not preclude a good clinical response to this regimen.
    Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology 02/2012; 69(5):1345-52. · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the efficacy and safety of CAPIRI+bevacizumab (Bev) in comparison with FOLFIRI+Bev as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients were randomised to receive either FOLFIRI plus Bev 5 mg kg(-1) every 2 weeks (Arm-A) or CAPIRI plus Bev 7.5 mg kg(-1) every 3 weeks (Arm-B). Three hundred thirty-three patients (Arm-A=167; Arm-B=166) were enrolled into the study. No difference was observed in median progression-free survival (PFS) (10.0 and 8.9 months; P=0.64), overall survival (25.7 and 27.5 months; P=0.55) or response rates (45.5 and 39.8.7%; P=0.32) for FOLFIRI-Bev and CAPIRI-Bev, respectively. Patients treated with CAPIRI-Bev presented significantly higher incidence of diarrhoea (P=0.005), febrile neutropenia (P=0.003) and hand-foot skin reactions (P=0.02) compared with patients treated with FOLFIRI-Bev. Treatment delays (P=0.05), dose reduction (P<0.001) and treatment discontinuation owing to toxicity (P=0.01) occurred more frequently in the CAPIRI-Bev arm. The PFS of FOLFIRI-BEV is not superior to that observed with the CAPIRI-Bev regimen. CAPIRI-Bev has a less favourable toxicity profile, requiring dose reductions, in order to be considered as an option in first-line treatment of patients with mCRC.
    British Journal of Cancer 01/2012; 106(3):453-9. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A subgroup analysis of oxaliplatin (LOHP)+irinotecan (CPT-11)+5-fluorouracil (5FU) and leucovorin (LV) (FOLFOXIRI regimen) versus irinotecan+5FU/LV (FOLFIRI regimen) as first-line treatment of patients >65 years old with metastatic colorectal cancer is presented. Eighty-two (56%) and 75 (55%) patients with metastatic colorectal cancer aged >65 years were enrolled in the FOLFOXIRI and FOLFIRI regimen, respectively. There was no statistically statistical difference in terms of overall survival or time-to-tumor progression between young and aged patients between the two chemotherapy arms. The objective response rate was significantly lower in older patients treated with FOLFOXIRI (32% vs. 52%; OR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.06-2.09; p=0.03). Elderly patients experienced a significantly higher incidence of grade 3/4 diarrhea compared to younger patients, irrespectively of the chemotherapy regimen (p=0.005 for FOLFIRI; p=0.017 for FOLFOXIRI). Dose reductions and treatment delays were more frequent in the FOLFOXIRI arm. FOLFOXIRI does not seem to offer substantial benefit compared to FOLFIRI regimen in elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.
    Critical reviews in oncology/hematology 09/2009; 76(1):61-70. · 5.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of a cisplatin plus etoposide regimen followed by thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) and paclitaxel plus cisplatin consolidation chemotherapy in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Thirty-nine patients with limited SCLC were enrolled onto this study. Patients received three courses of cisplatin 75 mg/m2 i.v., day 1 and etoposide 100 mg/m2 i.v., days 1-3 (EP regimen), followed by TRT (45-56 Gy administered in 15 fractions), and three courses of paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 i.v., day 1 and cisplatin, as previously, on day 2 (PP regimen); cycles were repeated every 21 days. All patients were evaluable for toxicity and 34 for response. The overall response rate was 67% (CR: 26%; PR: 41%; intention-to-treat analysis) (95% CI: 53.0-84.2%). After a median follow-up period of 15 months, the median survival time was 15 months, the median time to tumor progression 8.3 months and the 1-year survival rate 53.8%. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 39% and 36% of patients receiving EP and PP regimens, respectively. The incidence of febrile neutropenia was 5% and 3% for EP and PP regimens, respectively. Other hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities were mild, with the exception of esophagitis occurring in 36% of patients during and/or immediately after radiotherapy. Consolidation therapy with PP after sequential EP and thoracic radiotherapy is feasible and well-tolerated; however, the efficacy results are comparable with those previously obtained in the same patients' population using a combination of EP and TRT.
    Lung Cancer 08/2006; 53(1):59-65. · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the efficacy and toxicity of oxaliplatin (L-OHP) in combination with irinotecan (CPT-11), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (LV) (FOLFOXIRI) vs irinotecan and 5-FU/LV (FOLFIRI) as first-line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (MCC). A total of 283 chemotherapy-naïve patients with MCC were enrolled (FOLFIRI arm: n=146; FOLFOXIRI arm: n=137). In the FOLFOXIRI arm, CPT-11 (150 mg m(-2)) was given on d1, L-OHP (65 mg m(-2)) on d2, LV (200 mg m(-2)) on days 2 and 3 and 5-FU (400 mg m(-2) as i.v. bolus and 600 mg m(-2) as 22 h i.v. continuous infusion) on days 2 and 3. In the FOLFIRI arm, CPT-11 (180 mg m(-2)) was given on d1 whereas LV and 5-FU were administered in the same way as in the FOLFOXIRI regimen. Both regimens were administered every 2 weeks. There was no difference in terms of overall survival (median OS: 19.5 and 21.5 months, for FOLFIRI and FOLFOXIRI, respectively; P=0.337), median time to disease progression (FOLFIRI: 6.9 and FOLFOXIRI: 8.4 months; P=0.17), response rates (33.6 and 43% for FOLFIRI and FOLFOXIRI, respectively; P=0.168). Patients treated with FOLFOXIRI had a significantly higher incidence of alopecia (P=0.0001), diarrhoea (P=0.0001) and neurosensory toxicity (P=0.001) compared with patients treated with FOLFIRI. The present study failed to demonstrate any superiority of the FOLFOXIRI combination compared with the FOLFIRI regimen, although the observed median OS is one of the best ever reported in the literature.
    British Journal of Cancer 04/2006; 94(6):798-805. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A phase I study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated doses (MTDs) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of the pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and oxaliplatin combination in patients with advanced solid tumors. Forty-five patients with advanced-stage solid tumors received escalating doses of PLD 25-50 mg/m(2) as 60-min intravenous (i.v.) infusion and oxaliplatin 80-130 mg/m(2) as 2- to 4-hour i.v. infusion on day 1 every 3 weeks without growth factors. MTD was defined at PLD 45 mg/m(2) and oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2). Eleven dose levels were evaluated and DLTs were grade 2-3 neutropenia resulting in treatment delays, grade 3 neurotoxicity and nausea/vomiting. A total of 187 cycles were administered with two episodes of febrile neutropenia and one toxic death due to sepsis. Two (4%) and 6 (13%) patients developed grade 4 and 3 neutropenia, respectively, 2 (4%) and 1 (2%) grade 4 and 3 thrombocytopenia, and 1 (2%) grade 4 anemia. The most common nonhematological toxicities were grade 2-3 nausea/vomiting and asthenia observed in 27 (60%) and 16 (36%) of patients, respectively. One complete and eight partial responses were observed. The combination of PLD and oxaliplatin has an acceptable toxicity profile with promising activity and merits further evaluation in phase II studies.
    Oncology 02/2006; 71(3-4):190-6. · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A phase II study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of irinotecan (CPT-11), 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (5-FU/LV) (AIO regimen) as salvage treatment in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (MCC). Thirty-three patients relapsing after oxaliplatin-based first line chemotherapy were enrolled. There were 20 males and 13 females with median age of 69 years and WHO performance status (PS) of 0, 1, and 2 in 15, 16 and 2 patients, respectively. CPT-11 was administered on day 1 at 80 mg/m(2) in 60 min i.v. infusion, then LV (500 mg/m(2)) on day 1 as a 2h i.v. infusion, followed by 5-FU (2.600 mg/m(2)) as a 22h i.v. infusion. Treatment was repeated weekly for 6 consecutive weeks, in cycles of 7 weeks (one week rest). All patients were evaluable for toxicity and response. Complete response (CR) was achieved in 2 (6%) patients and partial response (PR) in 4 (12%) (over-all response rate - ORR: 18%, 95% C.I.: 5.95-35.43); 13 patients (40%) had stable disease (SD) and 14 (42%) progressive disease (PD). After a median follow up period of 9 months the median duration of response was 5 months, the median time to tumor progression (TTP) 7.5 months and the median overall survival (OS) 14 months. Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia occured in 13 (39%) patients, febrile neutropeina in 3 (9%), and grade 4 thrombocytopenia in one (3%). Grade 3/4 diarrhea occured in 12 (36%) patients, grade 3/4 neurotoxicity in 3 (9%), and grade 3 asthenia in 4 (12%). There was no treatment-related death. The combination of weekly CPT-11 and infusional 5-FU/LV is an active and relatively well-tolerated regimen as salvage treatment in MCC.
    Journal of B.U.ON.: official journal of the Balkan Union of Oncology 03/2005; 10(1):47-52. · 0.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the maximum-tolerated doses (MTDs) and the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of the weekly administration of docetaxel and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PEG-LD) in patients with advanced solid tumors. Forty-eight patients with solid tumors were enrolled in the study. Dose escalations of both drugs were given on a weekly basis for 3 consecutive weeks in cycles of 4 weeks. The starting dose for docetaxel was 20 mg/m(2)/week and for PEG-LD 6 mg/m(2)/week. The MTD was 35 mg/m(2)/week for docetaxel and 14 mg/m(2)/week for PEG-LD. The DLTs at this level were grade 3 diarrhea (n=1 patient) and grade 3 mucositis (n=2 patients). There was no grade 4 hematologic or non-hematologic toxicity. Grade 3 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia occurred only in 1 and 2 patients, respectively. The non-hematologic toxicity was also mild with grade 2/3 fatigue in 8 patients, grade 2/3 neurotoxicity in 4, grade 2/3 mucositis in 8, grade 2/3 diarrhea in 4 and grade 2/3 nausea and vomiting in 5 patients. Two (5.7%) complete and 6 (17%) partial responses (overall response rate=22.7%; 95% confidence interval 9.6--32.4%) were observed among 35 evaluable patients. In 12 (63%) of 19 patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer, a decline in serum levels of prostate-specific antigen of >50% was observed. The weekly administration of docetaxel with PEG-LD is a well-tolerated regimen that merits further evaluation.
    Oncology 01/2005; 69(3):202-7. · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of irinotecan (CPT-11) in combination with oxaliplatin (L-OHP) as first-line treatment in patients with locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer (AGC). Thirty-two patients with AGC who had not received previous therapy for metastatic disease were enrolled. The median age was 62.5 years and the World Health Organization performance status was 0-1 in 29 patients; 13 (40.6%) patients had previous surgery and three (9.4%) had adjuvant chemotherapy. L-OHP (85 mg/m2 as a 2-h i.v. infusion) followed by CPT-11 (200 mg/m2 as a 30-min i.v. infusion) was given on day 1, in cycles of 21 days. All patients were evaluable for toxicity and 31 were evaluable for response. Complete response was achieved in one (3.1%) patient and a partial response was achieved in 15 (46.9%) [overall response rate = 50% (95% confidence interval 38.7-72.4%)]. Eight (25%) patients had stable disease, and eight (25%) had progressive disease. The median duration of response was 5 months and the median time to disease progression was 5.5 months. After a median follow-up period of 16 months, the median survival time was 8.5 months. Grade 3-4 neutropenia occurred in six (18.6%) patients, febrile neutropenia in two (6.2%) and grade 3 anaemia in one (3.1%). Grade 3 diarrhoea was observed in two (6.2%) patients, grade 1 neurotoxicity in five (15.6%) and grade 3 asthenia in two (6.2%). There was no treatment-related death. The combination of CPT-11/L-OHP is an active regimen as front-line treatment in AGC with a favourable toxicity profile and deserves further evaluation in randomised studies.
    Annals of Oncology 09/2004; 15(8):1204-9. · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the docetaxel-gemcitabine combination administered every 2 weeks in women with untreated metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Fifty-two patients with MBC received docetaxel 65 mg/m2 as front-line chemotherapy intravenously over 1 h followed by gemcitabine 1,500 mg/m2 intravenously over 30 min on days 1 and 14. Cycles were repeated every 28 days without prophylactic growth factor support. Twenty-eight (54%) patients had previously received chemotherapy as adjuvant or neoadjuvant treatment. Thirty-six (69%) patients had visceral disease including 20 (38%) with liver metastases. All patients were evaluated for toxicity and 45 for response. In an intention-to-treat analysis, a complete response occurred in 7 (13%) patients and partial response in 24 (46%) for an overall response rate of 59% (95% CI: 46.3-73.0%). The response rate was 68% for the 28 patients who had previously received adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 67% for the 36 patients with visceral metastases. The median duration of response was 6.1 months and the median time to disease progression 10.9 months. A total of 254 cycles were administered with dose reduction in 26 (10%) cycles and no lethal toxicity. Grade III-IV neutropenia occurred in 17 (33%) patients and thrombocytopenia in 3 (6%). Febrile neutropenia developed in 3 (6%) patients. Nonhematological toxicity was generally mild. The docetaxel-gemcitabine combination is an active and well-tolerated front-line treatment for patients with MBC. This regimen represents a suitable option especially for women relapsing after anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy.
    Oncology 02/2004; 67(3-4):250-6. · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of docetaxel in combination with carboplatin as salvage treatment in women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Chemotherapy-pretreated women with MBC were treated with docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) as 1-hour i.v. infusion followed by carboplatin AUC 6 mg/ml.min, using the Calvert's formula, as 30-min i.v. infusion. Cycles were repeated on an outpatient basis every 3 weeks. Thirty-six patients received a total of 210 chemotherapy cycles (median 6 cycles/patient). All but one patient had previously received anthracyclines for the treatment of metastatic disease and half of the patients had failed to respond to front-line treatment. Twenty-eight (78%) patients had visceral disease. On an intention-to-treat analysis there were three (8%) complete and 19 (53%) partial responses for an overall response rate of 61% (95% CI: 45.2-77.0%). The response rate was 44% (2 CRs, 6 PRs) among 18 patients who had progressive or stable disease as best response to front-line treatment. The median duration of response was 8 months, the median time to tumor progression 10 months, and the probability of 1-year survival 66%. Grade 3-4 neutropenia was the main hematologic toxicity occurring in 16 (45%) patients or 36 (17%) cycles. Seven (19%) patients developed 8 (4%) febrile neutropenic episodes. Grade 3 thrombocytopenia occurred in 4 (11%) patients or 6 (3%) cycles. Non-hematologic toxicity was generally mild. G-CSF was used in 19 (53%) patients or 134 (64%) cycles. There was one sudden death possibly related to the treatment. The docetaxel-carboplatin combination is an active outpatient salvage regimen for the treatment of women with MBC relapsing or not responding to anthracycline-based front-line therapy.
    Oncology 02/2003; 64(3):207-12. · 2.17 Impact Factor
  • Oncology 02/2003; 64(4):477-8. · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the activity of the sequential administration of cisplatin-etoposide (PE) followed by topotecan (TOP) in patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Previously untreated patients with extensive stage SCLC received 4 cycles of cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) IV on day 1 and etoposide 100 mg/m(2) IV on days 1-3 every 21 days followed by 4 cycles of TOP 1.5 mg/m(2) IV on days 1-5 every 21 days. Thirty-eight patients were entered in the study. Their median age was 63 years and the performance status (WHO) was 0 for 5, 1 for 25 and 2 for 8 patients. All patients were evaluable for toxicity and 32 for response to PE and 25 to TOP. Of the 38 patients receiving PE, 1 (3%) patient achieved complete response (CR) and 17 (45%) partial responses (PR) for an overall response rate to PE of 47% (95% confidence interval: 36.7-68.5%). Four (23.5%) of the 17 patients with PR after PE, achieved CR with TOP. None of the patients with stable or progressive disease after PE responded to TOP. The response rate of the 27 patients receiving TOP following PE was 15% (95% confidence interval: 1.4-28.2%). After a median follow up of 9 months, the median duration of response was 6.5 months, the time to tumor progression 6.5 months, the median survival 8.5 months and the 1-year survival 34%. A total of 136 cycles of PE and 89 cycles of TOP have been administered with a median of 4 cycles/patient for each regimen. There were 2 toxic deaths after PE associated with grade IV febrile neutropenia. Treatment delays due to toxicity occurred in 17 (12%) cycles of PE and 20 (22%) cycles of TOP while doses were reduced in 7 (5%) and 4 (4%) cycles, respectively. Grade 3-4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and febrile neutropenia occurred in 24, 2 and 3% of PE cycles and 21, 12 and 1% of TOP. Non-hematologic toxicity was mild. The delivered dose intensity was 100% for PE and 93% for TOP. The sequential administration of TOP after PE is associated with manageable toxicity and may increase the number of CRs in patients with chemosensitive extensive stage SCLC. However, based on this data and the lack of survival benefit in a previous phase III study, the sequential regimen should not be used outside of a clinical trial.
    Lung Cancer 02/2003; 39(1):71-6. · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of docetaxel in combination with carboplatin as salvage treatment in women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Patients and Methods: Chemotherapy-pretreated women with MBC were treated with docetaxel 75 mg/m2 as 1-hour i.v. infusion followed by carboplatin AUC 6 mg/ml·min, using the Calvert’s formula, as 30-min i.v. infusion. Cycles were repeated on an outpatient basis every 3 weeks. Results: Thirty-six patients received a total of 210 chemotherapy cycles (median 6 cycles/patient). All but one patient had previously received anthracyclines for the treatment of metastatic disease and half of the patients had failed to respond to front-line treatment. Twenty-eight (78&percnt;) patients had visceral disease. On an intention-to-treat analysis there were three (8&percnt;) complete and 19 (53&percnt;) partial responses for an overall response rate of 61&percnt; (95&percnt; CI: 45.2–77.0&percnt;). The response rate was 44&percnt; (2 CRs, 6 PRs) among 18 patients who had progressive or stable disease as best response to front-line treatment. The median duration of response was 8 months, the median time to tumor progression 10 months, and the probability of 1-year survival 66&percnt;. Grade 3–4 neutropenia was the main hematologic toxicity occurring in 16 (45&percnt;) patients or 36 (17&percnt;) cycles. Seven (19&percnt;) patients developed 8 (4&percnt;) febrile neutropenic episodes. Grade 3 thrombocytopenia occurred in 4 (11&percnt;) patients or 6 (3&percnt;) cycles. Non-hematologic toxicity was generally mild. G-CSF was used in 19 (53&percnt;) patients or 134 (64&percnt;) cycles. There was one sudden death possibly related to the treatment. Conclusion: The docetaxel-carboplatin combination is an active outpatient salvage regimen for the treatment of women with MBC relapsing or not responding to anthracycline-based front-line therapy.
    Oncology - ONCOLOGY-BASEL. 01/2003; 64(3):207-212.
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    ABSTRACT: In order to investigate the feasibility of a potentially non-cross resistant drug regimen, we alternated cycles of cisplatin-etoposide with topotecan as front-line treatment in patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Thirty-six previously untreated patients with extensive stage SCLC received cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) IV on day 1 and etoposide 100 mg/m(2) IV on days 1-3 on cycles one, three, five and seven and topotecan 1.5 mg/m(2) IV on days 1-5 on cycles two, four, six and eight. Cycles were repeated every 21 days. Patients' median age was 60 years and performance status (WHO) was 0 for 13, 1 for 20 and 2 for three patients. All patients were evaluable for response and toxicity. Five (14%) patients achieved a complete response and 18 (50%) a partial response for an overall response rate of 64% (95% confidence interval: 48.2-79.6%). After a median follow up of 10 months, the median duration of response was 5.5 months, the time to tumor progression 8 months and the probability of 1-year survival 48.9%. A total of 126 cycles of cisplatin-etoposide and 117 cycles of topotecan were administered with a median number of 4 cycles/patient for each regimen. There were no toxic deaths. Treatment delays due to toxicity occurred in 13 (10%) cycles after cisplatin-etoposide and 16 (14%) cycles after topotecan while doses were reduced in seven (6%) and five (4%) cycles, respectively. Grade 3-4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and febrile neutropenia complicated 13, 1 and 3% of cisplatin-etoposide cycles and 28, 6 and 1% of topotecan, respectively. Non-hematologic toxicity was mild. The delivered dose intensity was 96% for cisplatin and etoposide and 98% for topotecan. The alternating administration of cisplatin-etoposide and topotecan is a feasible, active and well-tolerated regimen in patients with extensive stage SCLC.
    Lung Cancer 11/2002; 38(1):59-63. · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the prognostic significance of molecular detection of cytokeratin 19 (CK-19) mRNA-positive cells by nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the peripheral blood of women with stages I and II breast cancer before adjuvant chemotherapy. The sensitivity and specificity of CK-19 mRNA detection by nested RT-PCR were investigated using MCF-7 and ARH-77 cells and blood from healthy women and patients with hematologic malignancies, metastatic colorectal cancer, and early and metastatic breast cancer. Peripheral blood from 148 patients with operable breast cancer, obtained before initiation of any adjuvant therapy, was tested for the presence of CK-19 mRNA-positive cells. The nested RT-PCR assay for CK-19 mRNA detected one MCF-7 tumor cell in 10(6) normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells in four of five experiments; no signal was detected with the CK-19-negative ARH-77 cells. CK-19 mRNA was detected in the peripheral blood of 3.7% of healthy blood donors, 14.3% of patients with hematologic malignancies, and 3.2% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Detection rates for CK-19 mRNA-positive cells in the bone marrow/blood of patients with early or metastatic breast cancer were 63%/30% and 74%/52%, respectively. For stages I and II breast cancer, detection of CK-19-positive cells in the peripheral blood before adjuvant therapy was associated with reduced disease-free interval (P =.0007) and overall survival (P =.01). In multivariate analysis, detection of peripheral-blood CK-19-positive cells was an independent prognostic factor for disease relapse and death. Molecular detection of CK-19 mRNA-positive cells by RT-PCR in the peripheral blood of patients with stages I and II breast cancer before initiation of adjuvant therapy has independent prognostic value as a marker of poor clinical outcome.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 09/2002; 20(16):3404-12. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of the carboplatin-vinorelbine combination in pretreated patients with advanced breast cancer. Patients with histologically confirmed metastatic breast cancer relapsing or progressing after prior taxane and anthracycline containing chemotherapy were enrolled. Cohorts of 3-6 patients were treated at successive dose levels (DLs) with escalated doses of carboplatin [range, area under the curve (AUC) 4-6] on day 1 and vinorelbine (range, 20-35 mg/m(2)) on days 1 + 8 recycled every 28 days. Twenty-seven patients with a median age of 58 years and performance status (WHO) of 0-2 were treated at 6 DLs. All patients were assessable for toxicity and 20 for response. DLT was reached at carboplatin 6 AUC and vinorelbine 35 mg/m(2), and therefore, this was considered as the MTD. Prophylactic G-CSF administration could not allow further dose escalation. The recommended dose for further phase II testing was defined at carboplatin 6 AUC on day 1 and vinorelbine 30 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8. Among 98 administered treatment cycles 41 (42%) and 7 (7%) were complicated with grades 3 and 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, respectively. Nonhematologic toxicities included grade 2 peripheral neuropathy in 3 cycles and grades 2 and 3 fatigue in 32 (32%). The present study determined the feasibility of the combination of carboplatin at AUC 6 (day 1) and vinorelbine at 30 mg/m(2) (days 1 and 8 ) without G-CSF support in patients with taxane and anthracycline pretreated advanced breast cancer. Phase II studies at these doses should follow in order to determine the activity of the regimen.
    Oncology 02/2002; 62(2):103-9. · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Paclitaxel and doxorubicin are among the most active chemotherapeutic agents in various types of tumors. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Caelyx) has a more favorable pharmacokinetic and toxicity profile than the free drug. We conducted a phase I study to determine the maximum tolerated doses (MTD) and the dose limiting toxicities (DLT) of the combination administered every 2 weeks in patients with advanced solid tumors. Treatment consisted of escalating doses of Caelyx (12.5-17.5 mg/m2) administered as a 30-min intravenous infusion on day 1 and paclitaxel (90-115 mg/m2) as a 3-hour intravenous infusion on day 2 every 2 weeks without growth factor support. One cycle was considered as the administration of two consecutive treatments in 28 days. Twenty-six patients with histologically confirmed advanced stage solid tumors have been enrolled. Treatment was first-line treatment for 38% of patients, second-line for 31% and third-line for 31%. The DLT were evaluated during the first 4 weeks of treatment (2 treatment administrations) and consisted in all but one case of grade 2-3 neutropenia resulting in treatment delay. One patient died of cardiac arrest 1 day after the first treatment. A total of 86 cycles have been administered with only 1 episode of febrile neutropenia. Hematologic toxicity was generally mild. Only 1 patient at the first and another at the highest dose level developed grade 4 neutropenia. At the highest dose level, 3 of 6 patients developed grade 3 neutropenia. Grade 4 anemia or grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia was not observed. Non-hematologic toxicity included grade 2-3 nausea/vomiting in 10%, grade 2-4 diarrhea in 7% and grade 2-3 neurotoxicity in 8% of cycles. Mucositis grade 3 complicated 1 cycle. Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia grade 2-3 was observed in 3 patients and was the reason for treatment discontinuation in 1 patient. Cardiotoxicity as the development of congestive heart failure or more than 10% reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction was not observed. The most common non-hematologic toxicity was grade 2-3 asthenia complicating 31% of the cycles. Among 18 evaluable patients, 1 complete and 4 partial responses were observed primarily in patients with breast cancer. The MTD which are the recommended doses for further use in phase II trials were Caelyx 15 mg/m2 on day 1 and paclitaxel 115 mg/m2 on day 2 administered every 2 weeks. The administration of Caelyx and paclitaxel every 2 weeks is a feasible regimen and is associated with acceptable toxicity.
    Oncology 02/2002; 62(3):216-22. · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: In order to investigate the feasibility of a potentially non-cross resistant drug regimen, we alternated cycles of cisplatin–etoposide with topotecan as front-line treatment in patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Patients and Methods: Thirty-six previously untreated patients with extensive stage SCLC received cisplatin 75 mg/m2 IV on day 1 and etoposide 100 mg/m2 IV on days 1–3 on cycles one, three, five and seven and topotecan 1.5 mg/m2 IV on days 1–5 on cycles two, four, six and eight. Cycles were repeated every 21 days. Patients' median age was 60 years and performance status (WHO) was 0 for 13, 1 for 20 and 2 for three patients. All patients were evaluable for response and toxicity. Results: Five (14%) patients achieved a complete response and 18 (50%) a partial response for an overall response rate of 64% (95% confidence interval: 48.2–79.6%). After a median follow up of 10 months, the median duration of response was 5.5 months, the time to tumor progression 8 months and the probability of 1-year survival 48.9%. A total of 126 cycles of cisplatin–etoposide and 117 cycles of topotecan were administered with a median number of 4 cycles/patient for each regimen. There were no toxic deaths. Treatment delays due to toxicity occurred in 13 (10%) cycles after cisplatin–etoposide and 16 (14%) cycles after topotecan while doses were reduced in seven (6%) and five (4%) cycles, respectively. Grade 3–4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and febrile neutropenia complicated 13, 1 and 3% of cisplatin–etoposide cycles and 28, 6 and 1% of topotecan, respectively. Non-hematologic toxicity was mild. The delivered dose intensity was 96% for cisplatin and etoposide and 98% for topotecan. Conclusions: The alternating administration of cisplatin–etoposide and topotecan is a feasible, active and well-tolerated regimen in patients with extensive stage SCLC.
    Lung Cancer. 01/2002; 38(1):59-63.
  • European Journal of Cancer - EUR J CANCER. 01/2001; 37.

Publication Stats

417 Citations
69.74 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2006
    • University Hospital of Heraklion
      • Department of Gastroenterology
      Irákleio, Attica, Greece
    • Elena Venizelou Hospital
      Athínai, Attica, Greece
  • 2005
    • Θεαγένειο Αντικαρκινικό Νοσοκομείο
      Saloníki, Central Macedonia, Greece
  • 2002–2003
    • University of Crete
      • Department of Medical Oncology
      Réthymnon, Kriti, Greece