Shoichi Ichimura

National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama-ken, Japan

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Publications (47)76.68 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mechanical stress plays an important role in tissue morphogenesis and extracellular matrix metabolism. However, little is known about the effects of reduced loading without restriction of joint motion on the patella. We investigated the effects of long-term skeletal unloading on patellar cartilage and subchondral bone and systemic collagen II metabolism. Nine-week-old male F344/N rats (n=128) were randomly divided into two groups: caged control (C) and tail suspended (TS). Hindlimbs of the TS rats were subjected to unloading for up to 12 weeks. Sequential changes in the patellar cartilage and subchondral bone were analyzed macroscopically, by pathological findings and histomorphologically. All animals received double tidemark fluorochrome labeling prior to sacrifice. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in patellar cartilage, cross-linked C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTx-II) in 24-h urine and type II procollagen-C-peptide (pCol-II-C) in sera were also measured by DMB assay, ELISA and EIA, respectively. In the TS group, GAG content was significantly reduced only during the first 3 weeks. No further significant decrease was found. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was increased, especially at the deep zone. Tidemark mineral apposition rate (MAR) was temporally increased, which resulted in an increase in the ratio of calcified cartilage to the entire cartilage. In the medial part, in addition, thickness of the entire cartilage was decreased by temporal acceleration of subchondral ossification advancement and, in the medial margin, a full-thickness cartilage defect was revealed in 88.6% of TS rats. However, the remaining articular surface was free from fibrillation. While urinary CTx-II was significantly increased during the experimental periods, serum pCol-II-C was significantly decreased at the early phase. There were significant correlations between the urinary CTx-II levels and tidemark MAR. Our results provided evidence that skeletal unloading increased ALP activity at the deep zone and temporally accelerated tidemark advancement associated with a decrease in proteoglycan content. In addition, skeletal unloading temporally accelerated subchondral ossification advancement in the medial part of the patella and finally induced a full-thickness patellar cartilage defect without any fibrillation at the remaining articular surface by additional subchondral bone modeling and possible retarded cartilage growth, which was through a different mechanism than overloading.
    Bone 11/2008; 44(2):295-305. · 3.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a 24-year-old man and a 31-year-old woman who complained of persistent back pain with osteoid osteoma of the thoracic spine. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a round sclerotic lesion in the posterior element of the thoracic spine, although their plain radiographs showed no abnormalities except a slight scoliosis. The patients underwent total excision of the tumor via a posterior approach. They are currently asymptomatic with no recurrence of the lesion and have returned to full activity. The thin slice CT is one of the most important diagnostic tools for osteoid osteoma of the spine.
    Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques 05/2005; 18(2):182-4. · 1.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis is a major complication of chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We describe disordered bone metabolism in transgenic mice that overexpress human interleukin 1a (hIL-1a). Bone mineral density (BMD), microcomputed tomography (microCT), histomorphometry, and blood biochemical data of hIL-1a transgenic mice and littermate wild-type mice were examined. The femoral BMD of transgenic mice was decreased by 27.7% compared with wild-type mice. microCT revealed a marked reduction in the trabecular bone, and cortical thinning with an enlarged cavity was observed in femora of transgenic mice. Histomorphometric analysis revealed inhibition of several measures of bone formation, while the serum alkaline phosphatase level was reduced in transgenic mice; however, their indices of bone resorption were not elevated. Overexpression of hIL-1a causes osteopenia in mice. It was suggested that the systemic osteopenia in these transgenic mice occurred primarily as a result of decreased bone formation, with a reduction of bone mineralization rather than increased osteoclastic bone resorption. This may be one aspect of bone metabolism in RA that results in disease complications.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 03/2005; 32(2):320-4. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many investigators have reported satisfactory outcome in anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) performed for lumbar disc herniation or "multiply operated back" (MOB), but without comparing preoperative and postoperative dural tube area and cauda equina adhesion in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We conducted this study to determine these data in ALIF performed for lumbar disc herniation and MOB. Thirty-two patients who underwent ALIF, involving 38 discs, were studied. In MRI obtained before and after surgery (interval 9-48 months, mean 19.2 months), cross-sectional areas of the lumbar dural tube were measured from axial T2-weighted images using a computer-linked digitizer. At 30 disc levels operated on, the cauda was identified in images; cauda equina adhesions were classified according to Matsui et al (grade I-III). Clinical improvement was scored. Bony union was observed in radiographs of all patients. Preoperative and postoperative cross-sectional areas of the lumbar dural tube were 1.32 +/- 0.4 and 1.87 +/- 0.5 cm, respectively, and expansion ratio was 1.43 +/- 0.4. Recovery did not correlate with expansion ratio. Positive correlation was noted between expansion ratio and disc height ratio. At 30 disc levels where cauda equina was identified, 22 represented grade I and 8 represented grade II. At three of the latter, prior surgery had been performed via a posterior approach. No significant difference was noted in occurrence of grade II adhesions between primary ALIF and ALIF performed for MOB. Dural tube expansion was accomplished even without exposure of the tube, and cauda equina adhesion was uncommon in primary ALIF.
    Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques 03/2005; 18(1):18-22. · 1.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although many transpedicular screw systems have been developed and have undergone wide clinical use, experience with semirigid transpedicular systems has rarely been reported. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of the Crock-Yamagishi (C-Y) system for posterior spinal fusion in lumbar degenerative diseases. The outcomes for 26 patients (14 men, 12 women) with lumbar degenerative diseases who underwent posterior spinal fusion using the C-Y system were analyzed (posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), 11 patients; posterolateral fusion (PLF), 14; and facet fusion (FF), 1. Symptoms were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Assessment of Treatment for Low Back Pain (JOA score). Preoperative scores ranged from -1 to 23 points (mean, 12.8), while postoperative scores ranged from 19 to 29 points (mean, 26.4). Degree of recovery ranged from 23.1% to 100% (mean, 83.2%). Overall fusion rate was 96.2% (25/26). Neither breakage nor loosening of implants was observed radiographically. Intra- and postoperative complications included one case of transient L5 nerve root palsy attributable to surgical technique, and one deep postoperative infection. The C-Y system, categorized as semirigid, is effective when used with one- or two-level PLIF or PLF for lumbar degenerative disorders, grade I to II spondylolisthesis, and failed back syndrome.
    Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques 07/2004; 17(3):174-7. · 1.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to clarify the differential effect of vitamin K and vitamin D supplementation on bone mass in young rats fed a normal or low calcium diet. Ninety female Sprague-Dawley rats, 6 weeks of age, were randomized by stratified weight method into nine groups with 10 rats in each group: baseline control, and 0.5% (normal) or 0.1% (low) calcium diet, either alone, or with vitamin K (30 mg/100g, food intake), vitamin D (25 micro g/100 g, food intake), or vitamin K + vitamin D. After 10 weeks of feeding, bone histomorphometric analyses were performed on cortical bone of the tibial shaft and cancellous bone of the proximal tibia. Vitamin K supplementation increased the maturation-related cancellous bone gain and retarded the reduction in the maturation-related cortical bone gain in rats fed a low calcium diet, and increased the maturation-related cortical bone gain in rats fed a normal calcium diet. Vitamin D supplementation reduced the maturation-related cancellous bone gain, prevented the reduction in periosteal bone gain, and enhanced the enlargement of the marrow cavity, with no significant effect on the reduction in the maturation-related cortical bone gain in rats fed a low calcium diet, and increased the maturation- related cancellous and cortical bone gains with increased periosteal bone gain in rats fed a normal calcium diet. An additive effect of vitamin K and vitamin D on the maturation- related cortical bone gain was found in rats fed a normal calcium diet. This study shows the differential effects of vitamin K and vitamin D supplementation on cancellous and cortical bone mass in young rats fed a normal or low calcium diet, as well as the additive effect on cortical bone under calcium sufficient condition.
    Yonsei Medical Journal 05/2004; 45(2):314-24. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    Jun Iwamoto, Tsuyoshi Takeda, Shoichi Ichimura
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of short-term treatment with the antiresorptive agent, etidronate, on orchidectomized adult rats, via comparison of three cancellous bone sites, the lumbar vertebral body (LVB), proximal tibial metaphysis (PTM), and distal tibial metaphysis (DTM). Thirty-five male Wistar rats, aged 10 months, were randomly divided into four groups: baseline control (BLC, nF10), age-matched sham-operated control (AMC, nF9), orchidectomy (ORX, nF9), and ORXBetidronate treatment (nF7). Etidronate treatment (10 mg/kg, daily subcutaneous injection) was initiated 2 weeks after surgery and was continued for 2 weeks. Four weeks after surgery, the 5th LVB, PTM, and DTM were processed for histomorphometric analysis of cancellous bone (secondary spongiosa). ORX resulted in a decrease in body weight. No significant difference in cancellous bone volume (BV/TV) was found between the BLC and AMC groups at any skeletal site. The cancellous BV/TV loss was attributable to increased eroded surface (ES/BS) with no significant alteration in the mineral apposition rate (MAR), at all skeletal sites and etidronate treatment in ORX rats significantly decreased ES/BS to a level not significantly different from that in the AMC group, resulting in complete prevention of ORX-induced cancellous BV/TV loss. The MAR was markedly decreased in the PTM and LVB, but maintained in the DTM by etidronate treatment. The present study showed that etidronate treatment could completely prevent ORX-induced cancellous bone loss regardless skeletal sites by suppressing bone resorption. In particular, suppression of bone formation in terms of osteoblastic activity by etidronate treatment was not evident only in the DTM
    The Keio Journal of Medicine 04/2004; 53(1):12-7.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this prospective study was to determine whether moderate walking exercise in postmenopausal women with osteopenia/osteoporosis would affect bone metabolism. Fifty postmenopausal women, aged 49-75 years, with osteopenia/osteoporosis were recruited: 32 women entered the exercise program (the exercise group) and 18 served as controls (the control group). The exercise consisted of daily outdoor walking, the intensity of which was 50% of maximum oxygen consumption, with a duration of at least 1 h with more than 8000 steps, at a frequency of 4 days a week, over a 12-month period. Lumbar (L2-L4) bone mineral density (BMD) was measured at the baseline and every 6 months with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in both groups. Serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and urinary cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (NTX) levels were measured at baseline and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 by EIA and ELISA, respectively, in the exercise group, and urinary NTX level was measured at the baseline and every 6 months in the control group. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics including age, height, body weight, bone mass index, years since menopause, lumbar BMD, and urinary NTX level between the two groups. Although no significant changes were observed in lumbar BMD and the urinary NTX level in the control group, lumbar BMD in the exercise group was increased as compared with the control group, but was sustained from the baseline. In the exercise group, the urinary NTX level rapidly responded to walking exercise from month 3, and this reduction was sustained until month 12, followed by reduction in the serum BAP level. A moderately negative correlation was found between the percent change in the urinary NTX level at month 3 and that in lumbar BMD at month 12 in the exercise group. This study clearly demonstrates that the mechanism for the positive response of lumbar BMD to moderate walking exercise in postmenopausal women with osteopenia/osteoporosis appears to be the suppression of bone turnover, and that an early change in the urinary NTX level may be useful to predict the long-term response of increasing lumbar BMD to exercise, although its efficacy for lumbar BMD may be quite modest.
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism 02/2004; 22(5):500-8. · 2.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The chondron is the microanatomical unit composed of a chondrocyte and its pericellular microenvironment (PCME), including the pericellular matrix and capsule. In the present study, we extracted chondrons from human articular cartilages and investigated the relationship between the distribution of the matrix molecules, including type VI collagen, and the degeneration of articular cartilage. We also investigated the effects of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta1) on the distribution of type VI collagen in cultured chondrocytes. Chondrons were extracted by low-speed homogenization from cartilage pieces obtained from forensic autopsies and from patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Cartilage sections were classified into three groups (normal, slight degeneration, and moderate degeneration) based on the degree of degeneration according to Mankin's score. Extracted chondrons were immunostained, and the distribution of the matrix molecules, including type VI collagen, was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The chondrocytes isolated by enzymic treatment were subjected to three-dimensional culture in agarose gel and then treated with IL-1beta or TGF-beta1. The distribution of newly synthesized type VI collagen in agarose gel was also investigated using the CLSM. Type VI collagen was localized specifically within the PCME of chondrons. The volume ratio of PCME to chondrocyte (P/C ratio) was significantly higher in the moderate degeneration group than in the other two groups. The accumulation of type VI collagen around a chondrocyte was obviously increased by the addition of TGF-beta1. The P/C ratio significantly increased as the severity of the OA progressed, suggesting that type VI collagen distributed specifically in the PCME was playing a protective role for chondrocytes by maintaining the pericellular microenvironment in OA.
    Journal of Orthopaedic Science 02/2004; 9(1):29-36. · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of exercise on bone mass, bone metabolism, and calciotropic hormones in young growing rats. Twenty 6-week-old female Wistar rats were randomized into the following four groups with 5 animals each: 7 weeks of exercise, 7 weeks of sedentary control, 11 weeks of exercise, and 11 weeks of sedentary control. The exercise regimen consisted of running on a treadmill at 25 m/min for 1 h each day on 5 days a week. After each period of exercise, the bone mineral content (BMC) of the tibia and fifth lumbar spine was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, using a Lunar DPX-L instrument. The femoral length and levels of bone markers and calciotropic hormones were also assessed. Seven and 11 weeks of exercise increased the serum osteocalcin and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) levels, and decreased the serum parathyroid level. Seven weeks of exercise decreased the urinary deoxypyridinoline level, and 11 weeks of exercise increased the serum alkaline phosphatase level and decreased the serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase level. As a result, 7 and 11 weeks of exercise increased the femoral length and tibial BMC, but did not alter the lumbar BMC. The present study demonstrates that treadmill exercise stimulates bone formation and suppresses bone resorption, increases the serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) level, and decreases the serum parathyroid hormone level, resulting in an increase in bone mass with stimulation of longitudinal bone growth, especially at weight-bearing sites, in young growing rats. Further studies with long-term exercise may be needed to obtain a positive effect on the lumbar BMC.
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism 02/2004; 22(1):26-31. · 2.22 Impact Factor
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    Bone 01/2004; 34(3):589-590. · 3.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of treatment with etidronate and alendronate on bone resorption, back pain, and activities of daily living (ADL) in elderly women with vertebral fractures. Fifty elderly women, 63-84 years of age, with back pain due to osteoporotic vertebral fractures were randomly divided into two groups with 25 patients in each group: the cyclical etidronate treatment group (200 mg/day for 2 weeks per 3 months) and the alendronate treatment group (5 mg/day). The level of urinary cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (NTx) measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, back pain evaluated with the face scale score, and the ADL score (disability) determined with a questionnaire were assessed before and 3 and 6 months after the start of treatment. No significant differences in these parameters were found between the two groups before the treatment. The urinary NTx level, the face scale score, and the ADL score decreased significantly in both groups. Although the reduction in the urinary NTx level was significantly greater in the alendronate group than in the etidronate group, the reduction in the face scale score was transiently significantly greater in the etidronate group than in the alendronate group. However, changes in the ADL score did not significantly differ between the two groups. The present study showed that although back pain was reduced and ADL was improved in both treatment groups of elderly women with vertebral fractures, the mechanism for the reduction in back pain differs to some extent between the two treatment groups. A double-blind placebo-controlled study is needed to confirm the therapeutic effects of these agents on back pain and deterioration of ADL.
    The Keio Journal of Medicine 01/2004; 52(4):230-5.
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    Jun Iwamoto, Tsuyoshi Takeda, Shoichi Ichimura
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    ABSTRACT: Vitamin K2, as well as bisphosphonates, such as etidronate, alendronate, and risedronate, is widely used in the treatment with osteoporosis in Japan. Etidronate increases the lumbar bone mineral density (BMD), and prevents new vertebral fractures, in patients with osteoporosis, while alendronate and risedronate increase the lumbar and femoral neck BMDs, and prevent new vertebral and femoral neck fractures. Vitamin K2 enhances gamma-carboxylation of bone glutamic acid residues and the secretion of osteocalcin, sustains the lumbar BMD, and prevents osteoporotic fractures in patients with osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates, such as alendronate and risedronate, rather than vitamin K2, should be initially chosen for the treatment of osteoporosis, because they are more efficacious than vitamin K2. Available evidence suggest that risedronate prevents deterioration of the connectivity of the trabeculae in ovariectomized rats, whereas vitamin K2 increase the trabecular thickness, and that a combination of risedronate and vitamin K2 has a synergistic effect on preventing the deterioration of trabecular bone architecture induced by estrogen deficiency. Some studies have shown that combined treatment with etidronate and vitamin K2 appears to be more effective than etidronate alone in the prevention of new osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Based on these findings, combined treatment with vitamin K2 and bisphosphonates may be more efficacious in the prevention new vertebral fractures than a single treatment with bisphosphonate in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Thus, this combined treatment should be recommended for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. It is proposed that the role of vitamin K2 should be emphasized, when used in combination with bisphosphonates, especially in patients with vitamin K deficiency.
    Yonsei Medical Journal 11/2003; 44(5):751-6. · 1.31 Impact Factor
  • J Iwamoto, J K Yeh, T Takeda, S Ichimura, Y Sato
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to clarify the difference in the effects of vitamin K and vitamin D supplementation on the development of osteopenia in young rats under mild calcium deficiency. Sixty female Sprague-Dawley rats, 6 weeks of age, were randomized by stratified weight method into six groups with 10 rats in each group: baseline control, 0.5% (normal) calcium diet, 0.1% (low) calcium diet, 0.1% calcium diet + vitamin K (30 mg/100 g, food intake), 0.1% calcium diet + vitamin D (25 microg/100 g, food intake), and 0.1% calcium diet + K + D. After 10 weeks of feeding, serum calcium, 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) [25 (OH) D(3)], 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25 (OH)(2) D(3)], and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were measured, and intestinal calcium absorption and renal calcium reabsorption were evaluated. Bone histomorphometric analyses were performed on cortical bone of the tibial shaft and cancellous bone of the proximal tibia. Calcium deficiency induced hypocalcemia, increased serum PTH and 1,25 (OH)(2) D(3) levels with decreased serum 25 (OH) D(3) level, stimulated intestinal calcium absorption and renal calcium reabsorption, and reduced maturation-related cortical bone gain as a result of decreased periosteal bone gain and enlarged marrow cavity but did not significantly influence maturation-related cancellous bone gain. Vitamin K supplementation in calcium-deficient rats stimulated renal calcium reabsorption, retarded the abnormal elevation of serum PTH level, increased maturation-related cancellous bone gain, and retarded the reduction in maturation-related cortical bone gain. On the other hand, vitamin D supplementation in calcium-deficient rats stimulated intestinal calcium absorption via increased serum 1,25 (OH)(2) D(3) level with prevention of the abnormal elevation of serum PTH level, prevented hypocalcemia, reduced the maturation-related cancellous bone gain, and prevented the reduction in periosteal bone gain and enhanced enlargement of the marrow cavity with no significant effect on the reduction in maturation-related cortical bone gain. However, no synergistic effect of vitamin K and vitamin D on intestinal calcium absorption, renal calcium reabsorption, and cancellous and cortical bone mass was found. This study shows the differential effects of vitamin K and vitamin D supplementation on the development of osteopenia in young rats under mild calcium deficiency. Vitamin K supplementation stimulates renal calcium reabsorption, increases maturation-related cancellous bone gain, and retards the reduction in maturation-related cortical bone gain, whereas vitamin D supplementation stimulates intestinal calcium absorption and prevents the reduction in maturation-related periosteal bone gain by inducing accumulation of calcium from cancellous and endocortical bone.
    Bone 11/2003; 33(4):557-66. · 3.82 Impact Factor
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    Jun Iwamoto, Tsuyoshi Takeda, Shoichi Ichimura
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    ABSTRACT: It is established in Japan that treatment with 1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 (alfacalcidol) slightly reduces bone turnover, sustains lumbar bone mineral density (BMD), and prevents osteoporotic vertebral fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, while vitamin K2 (menatetrenone) enhances gamma-carboxylation of bone glutamic acid residues and secretion of osteocalcin, sustains lumbar BMD, and prevents osteoporotic fractures in patients with osteoporosis. Available evidence suggests that the effect of vitamin K2 on mineralization by human periosteal osteoblasts is enhanced in the presence of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 in vitro. The effect of vitamin K2 on BMD in ovariectomized rats is affected by the plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 level in vivo, and is significant only when rats are fed a diet containing vitamin D3. Based on this line of evidence, combined treatment with alfacalcidol and menatetrenone for osteoporosis is surmised to be more effective than treatment with menatetrenone alone, and may have anabolic effects on osteoporotic bone. This combined treatment may increase bone formation as well as bone resorption over the mild anti-resorptive effect of alfacalcidol itself, and shows the greatest effect on lumbar BMD or the incidence of vertebral fractures in studies in which the mean age and years since menopause of subjects were low and the degree of osteoporosis was mild. It may be effective for mild postmenopausal osteoporosis in which age-related deterioration of trabecular bone properties remains below the threshold for vertebral fractures, even if bone resorption is increased and trabecular bone has deteriorated.
    The Keio Journal of Medicine 10/2003; 52(3):147-50.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the present study was to examine the early response of lumbar bone mineral density (BMD), bone resorption, and back pain to alendronate after treatment with cyclical etidronate in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Forty postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, 60-83 years of age, without any vertebral fractures in the lumbar spine, were randomly divided into two groups with 20 patients in each group: 18 months of cyclical etidronate (200 mg daily for 2 weeks every 3 months) group and 12 months of cyclical etidronate followed by 6 months of alendronate (5 mg daily) group. BMD of the lumbar spine (L1-L4) measured by DXA, urinary cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (NTX) level measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and back pain evaluated by face scale score were assessed at baseline and every 6 months. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics including age, body mass index, years since menopause, lumbar BMD, urinary NTX level, and face scale score between the two groups. Cyclical etidronate significantly reduced urinary NTx level and face scale score over 12 months, but did not significantly increase lumbar BMD. After 12 months of treatment, the switch to alendronate significantly reduced urinary NTX level and face scale score, and significantly increased lumbar BMD, while continued cyclical etidronate did not significantly alter these parameters. These results suggest that switching to alendronate after treatment with cyclical etidronate produces a greater response of lumbar BMD, bone resorption, and back pain than continued cyclical etidronate in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.
    The Keio Journal of Medicine 07/2003; 52(2):113-9.
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    ABSTRACT: A variety of procedures for reconstructing the spine following the removal of spinal cord and cauda equina tumours have been developed to prevent postoperative spinal deformities and nerve entrapment. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new reconstructive procedure based on rotational laminoplasty and to report preliminary results in a small series. The trough is drilled at the border of the laminae and articular processes and the ligamentum flavum is resected on its cephalocaudal aspect, so the vertebral arch can be separated as a single mass. After tumour resection, the vertebral arch is removed en bloc with the laminae, and is rotated 90 degrees and placed on the articular facets and fixed using suture passing through holes drilled in the bone. One man and six women underwent rotational laminoplasty following resection of spinal or cauda equina tumours. Operative exposure was good and permitted complete resection. Patients did well postoperatively from both spine-surgical and neurosurgical points of view. Computed tomography documented a bony union with preservation of widely patent spinal canal. Rotational laminoplasty affords a satisfactory operative exposure for the resection of large, complex lesions. It creates a widely patent, stable spinal canal easily, without the need for special tools.
    Acta Neurochirurgica 07/2003; 145(6):495-500; discussion 500. · 1.55 Impact Factor
  • J Iwamoto, T Takeda, S Ichimura
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoclastic activation rather than suppression of bone formation has been suggested to be the dominant process leading to bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although many studies have already shown the correlation of urinary pyridinoline (PYD) and deoxypyridinoline (DPD) levels with RA-related bone loss, urinary cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen (NTx), a more specific marker of bone-derived type I collagen fragments in urine than urinary PYD and DPD in RA, has not been adequately studied. The purpose of the present study was to determine clinical factors that are associated with an increase in urinary NTx levels in patients with RA. One hundred and eighty-four patients with RA and 185 sex- and age-matched controls were enrolled in the study: 71 men, 37-68 years of age (RA: 31, controls: 40); 129 premenopausal women, 30-48 years of age (RA: 67, controls: 62), and 169 postmenopausal women, 48-69 years of age (RA: 86, controls: 83). The correlations of urinary NTx levels, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with anatomic grade in the wrist, functional class, duration of disease, steroid use, modified health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) score for the upper and lower extremities, the levels of serum c-reactive protein and rheumatoid factor (RF), erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and/or years since menopause were examined by multiple regression analysis. Urinary NTx levels (nmol BCE/mmol Cr) did not differ significantly between men with RA and controls (53.2 +/- 29.6 vs 41.0 +/- 19.6, respectively), whereas urinary NTx levels were significantly higher in pre- and postmenopausal women with RA than in respective controls (premenopausal women: 57.1 +/- 36.6 vs 42.3 +/- 21.3, P <0.01; women: 76.2 +/- 27.3 vs 57.1 +/- 28.3, P <0.001). In men with RA, no clinical factors were significantly correlated with urinary NTx levels. In premenopausal women with RA, functional class, HAQ score for the upper extremities, and RF were significantly correlated with urinary NTx levels (all P <0.05); in postmenopausal women with RA, functional class and RF were significantly correlated with urinary NTx levels (both P <0.05). These findings suggest that urinary NTx levels were significantly higher only in women with RA than in age-matched controls, and a RA-related increase in urinary NTx levels may be associated with physical inactivity and disease activity.
    Calcified Tissue International 04/2003; 72(4):491-7. · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using the atelocollagen honeycomb-shaped scaffold with a membrane seal (ACHMS-scaffold) for the culture of annulus fibrosus (AF) cells in tissue engineering procedures of intervertebral disc repair. AF cells from the intervertebral discs of Japanese white rabbits were cultured for up to 3 weeks in the ACHMS-scaffold to allow a high density, three-dimensional culture. Although the DNA content in the scaffold increased at a lower rate than in the monolayer culture, scanning electron microscopy data showed that the scaffold was filled with the grown AF cells and produced extracellular matrix on day 21. The amount of type II collagen and its mRNA expression by the scaffold cultured cells were determined using Western blotting and Northern blotting analyses, respectively, and remained at a higher level than in the monolayer cultured cells. Furthermore, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation in the scaffold culture was at a higher level than in the monolayer culture. Western blot analysis for extracted proteoglycans from the scaffold culture also exhibited a much higher proteoglycan accumulation than the monolayer culture. These results indicate that the AF cells are able to grow and remain phenotypically stable in the scaffold.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A 03/2003; 64(2):248-56. · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of orchidectomy and sciatic neurectomy on cortical and cancellous bone in male rats. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats, 6 weeks of age, were randomized into five groups, with ten rats in each group: baseline control, age-matched intact control, orchidectomy (ORX), unilateral sciatic neurectomy (NX), and ORX + NX. After 8 weeks of feeding, the tibial shaft and proximal tibia were processed for cortical and cancellous bone histomorphometric analyses, respectively. ORX-induced reductions in maturation-related cortical and cancellous bone gains were attributable to decreased periosteal bone gain and increased trabecular bone resorption, respectively. NX- and ORX + NX-induced reductions in maturation-related cortical bone gain were attributable to decreased periosteal bone formation and increased endocortical bone turnover, while NX- and ORX + NX -induced reductions in maturation-related cancellous bone gain were attributable to increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation. NX more markedly reduced maturation-related cortical and cancellous bone gains than did ORX, and the ORX-induced reductions in maturation-related cortical and cancellous bone gains were more pronounced when combined with NX. The present study demonstrated differences in changes in cortical and cancellous bone following ORX and NX in young rats. The importance of mechanical loading, with or without testosterone deficiency, is emphasized in cortical and cancellous bone growth.
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism 02/2003; 21(4):211-6. · 2.22 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

560 Citations
76.68 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000–2005
    • National Defense Medical College
      • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      Tokorozawa, Saitama-ken, Japan
  • 2003–2004
    • Kyorin University
      • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1998–2004
    • Keio University
      • • Institute for Integrated Sports Medicine
      • • School of Medicine
      Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan