Laurence Dubourg

Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France

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Publications (87)227.01 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Patients with Gitelman syndrome (GS), an inherited salt-losing tubulopathy, are usually treated with potassium-sparing diuretics or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and oral potassium and magnesium supplementations. However, evidence supporting these treatment options is limited to case series studies. We designed an open-label, randomized, crossover study with blind end point evaluation to compare the efficacy and safety of 6-week treatments with one time daily 75 mg slow-release indomethacin, 150 mg eplerenone, or 20 mg amiloride added to constant potassium and magnesium supplementation in 30 patients with GS (individual participation: 48 weeks). Baseline plasma potassium concentration was 2.8±0.4 mmol/L and increased by 0.38 mmol/L (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.23 to 0.53; P<0.001) with indomethacin, 0.15 mmol/L (95% CI, 0.02 to 0.29; P=0.03) with eplerenone, and 0.19 mmol/L (95% CI, 0.05 to 0.33; P<0.01) with amiloride. Fifteen patients became normokalemic: six with indomethacin, three with eplerenone, and six with amiloride. Indomethacin significantly reduced eGFR and plasma renin concentration. Eplerenone and amiloride each increased plasma aldosterone by 3-fold and renin concentration slightly but did not significantly change eGFR. BP did not significantly change. Eight patients discontinued treatment early because of gastrointestinal intolerance to indomethacin (six patients) and hypotension with eplerenone (two patients). In conclusion, each drug increases plasma potassium concentration in patients with GS. Indomethacin was the most effective but can cause gastrointestinal intolerance and decreased eGFR. Amiloride and eplerenone have similar but lower efficacies and increase sodium depletion. The benefit/risk ratio of each drug should be carefully evaluated for each patient.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN. 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Adequate estimation of renal function in obese patients is essential for the classification of patients in CKD category as well as the dose adjustment of drugs. However, the body size descriptor for GFR indexation is still debatable, and formulas are not validated in patients with extreme variations of weight. This study included 209 stages 1-5 CKD obese patients referred to the Department of Renal Function Study at the University Hospital in Lyon between 2010 and 2013 because of suspected renal dysfunction. GFR was estimated with the Chronic Kidney Disease and Epidemiology equation (CKD-EPI) and measured with a gold standard method (inulin or iohexol) not indexed (mGFR) or indexed to body surface area determined by the Dubois and Dubois formula with either real (mGFRr) or ideal (mGFRi) body weight. Mean bias (eGFR-mGFR), precision, and accuracy of mGFR were compared with the results obtained for nonobese participants (body mass index between 18.5 and 24.9) who had a GFR measurement during the same period of time. Mean mGFRr (51.6±24.2 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) was significantly lower than mGFR, mGFRi, and eGFRCKD-EPI. eGFRCKD-EPI had less bias with mGFR (0.29; -1.7 to 2.3) and mGFRi (1.62; -3.1 to 0.45) compared with mGFRr (8.7; 7 to 10). This result was confirmed with better accuracy for the whole cohort (78% for mGFR, 84% for mGFRi, and 72% for mGFRr) and participants with CKD stages 3-5. Moreover, the Bland Altman plot showed better agreement between mGFR and eGFRCKD-EPI. The bias between eGFRCKD-EPI and mGFRr was greater in obese than nonobese participants (8.7 versus 0.58, P<0.001). This study shows that, in obese CKD patients, the performance of eGFRCKD-EPI is good for GFR≤60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Indexation of mGFR with body surface area using ideal body weight gives less bias than mGFR scaled with body surface area using real body weight.
    Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 01/2014; · 5.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives Klotho is an “aging-suppressor” gene and encodes a single-pass transmembrane protein predominantly expressed in renal tubules. Whether chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects serum Klotho is poorly documented. We aimed to measure the relationship of serum α-Klotho with renal function, acid–base status, bone biomarkers, and proteinuria in CKD patients. Design Setting, Participants, and Measurements We measured serum α-Klotho, serum FGF23, and glomerular filtration rate by inulin clearance in 60 CKD patients between January and July 2011. We also measured serum creatinine, bicarbonate, calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, C-reactive protein, and 25-OH vitamin D. Proteinuria was obtained from a 24-h urine collection. Results The median serum α-Klotho was 478 (348-658) pg/mL. We found an inverse relationship between serum α-Klotho and serum creatinine (r = −0.36, P = .007), proteinuria (r = −0.36, P = .013), and a positive relationship with serum bicarbonate (r = 0.33, P = .011). There was no further significant relation between serum α-Klotho and inulin clearance or serum FGF23. Multiple regression analysis including serum bicarbonate, serum creatinine, and proteinuria indicated that only serum bicarbonate was associated with serum α-Klotho (P = .003). Conclusions This study shows that in CKD, serum α-Klotho is related to serum bicarbonate and proteinuria and not to renal function. Further research is required to determine whether correcting these 2 amenable conditions would improve serum α-Klotho.
    Journal of Renal Nutrition 01/2014; · 1.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Renal dysfunction is frequent in liver cirrhosis and is a strong prognostic predictor of orthotropic liver transplantation (OLT) outcome. Therefore, an accurate evaluation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is crucial in pre-OLT patients. However, in these patients, plasma creatinine (Pcr) is inaccurate and the place of serum cystatine C (CystC) is still debated. New GFR-predicting equations, based on standardized assays of Pcr and/or CystC, have been recently recommended in the general population but their performance in cirrhotic patients has been rarely studied. We evaluated the performance of the recently published Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations (CKD-EPI-Pcr, CKD-EPI-CystC, and CKD-EPI-Pcr-CystC) and the more classical ones (4- and 6-variable MDRD and Hoek formulas) in cirrhotic patients referred for renal evaluation before OLT. Inulin clearance was performed in 202 consecutive patients together with the determination of Pcr and CystC with assays traceable to primary reference materials. The performance of the GFR-predicting equations was evaluated according to ascites severity (no, moderate, or refractory) and to hepatic and renal dysfunctions (MELD score ≤ or > 15 and KDOQI stages, respectively). In the whole population, CystC-based equations showed a better performance than Pcr-based ones (lower bias and higher 10% and 30% accuracies). CKD-EPI-CystC equation showed the best performance whatever the ascites severity and in presence of a significant renal dysfunction (GFR< 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ). Conclusions: Pcr-based GFR predicting equations are not reliable in pre-OLT patients even when an IDMS-traceable enzymatic Pcr assay is used. Whenever a CystC-assay traceable to primary reference materials is performed and when true a measurement of GFR is not possible, CystC-based equations, especially CKD-EPI-CystC, may be recommended to evaluate renal function and for KDOQI staging. (Hepatology 2013;).
    Hepatology 10/2013; · 12.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A new estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) equation, designed for isotope dilution mass spectrometry-standardized serum creatinine (Scr), is presented for use in children, adolescent boys and girls and young adults. The new equation, eGFR = 107.3/(Scr/Q), is based on the concept of normalized Scr: Q is the normalization value and is considered as the Scr concentration for the average healthy child, adolescent or young adult of a specific height (L) and is modeled as a height-dependent polynomial of the fourth degree. The well-known Schwartz equation [eGFR = kL/Scr, k = 0.413 (Schwartz) or k = 0.373 (Schwartz-Lyon)] for children between 1 and 14 years can be seen as a special case of the new equation for which the Q-polynomial is simplified to a linear equation: Q = 0.0035 × L (cm). The new eGFR equation has been validated in a data set of n = 750 children, adolescents and young adults aged 10-25, against the true GFR (inulin method), and outperforms the selected (but most used) creatinine-based eGFR equations for children, mainly in the healthy GFR region. The new Q(height)-eGFR equation serves as an excellent screening tool for kidney disease in 1-25-year-old children, adolescents and young adults.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 09/2013; · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The current equations for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have limited precision in older people. The Berlin Initiative Study (BIS-1) equation has recently been developed to improve the precision and accuracy of GFR estimation in older people, over the previous simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study and the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations. Methods: The study included 224 white patients aged >70 years who had simultaneous measurements of plasma creatinine and renal clearance of inulin. Creatinine assays used an enzymatic method with calibrators defined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The performance of BIS-1, MDRD and CKD-EPI equations in estimating GFR were compared. Results: BIS-1 was the most accurate: the percentage of GFR estimates that fell within the range of measured GFR ± 30% (P30) was 75.56% vs. 70.67% with MDRD and 72% with CKD-EPI. BIS-1 had the lowest median bias: (interquartile range) (4.1 (11.4) vs 5.8 (12.7) and 5.4 (12.8) respectively) the highest precision (the SD of the estimated GFR minus measured GFR differences was 9.21 vs 12.78 and 10.83 mL/min/1.73 m² respectively) and the highest concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) (0.82 vs. 0.74 and 0.79 respectively, p<0.05). However, in chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 4 and 5, the CKD-EPI equation had the highest P30, the lowest median bias and the highest CCC: it was more accurate than the BIS-1 equation. Conclusion: Among the 3 creatinine-based equations compared, BIS-1 was the most reliable for assessing renal function in older white patients, especially in those with CKD stages 1 to 3.
    Journal of nephrology 07/2013; · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and uric acid (UA) levels increase early during chronic kidney disease (CKD). The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between these two parameters at different stages of pediatric CKD. Patients and methods One hundred patients (range, 5–18 years) were included in this retrospective study: they had undergone renal exploration with a direct measurement of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using the reference standard (i.e., inulin clearance, Cin) and presented with increased circulating levels of PTH and/or UA. Results GFR was normal in 39% of patients, with UA increased in 44% and PTH in 75% of them. Interestingly, 29% of the children with increased PTH levels had a strictly normal GFR (i.e., above 90 mL/min/1.73 m2). An inverse association was found between UA and GFR (r = −0.452, P ≤ 0.0001) as well as between PTH and GFR (r = −0.226, P = 0.024). The same negative relationships were found between UA and PTH (r = −0.266, P = 0.007), and between UA and the phosphate reabsorption rate (r = −0.415, P < 0.001). Discussion Since hyperuricemia was found at all stages of CKD, an early silent tubular impairment can be discussed to explain these findings. The early increase in PTH levels during CKD has not been described by all authors, with North American studies describing rather late increased PTH levels during CKD. Prospective studies are required to confirm these data and evaluate the role of UA in the pathophysiology of the mineral disorders observed during CKD.
    Archives de Pédiatrie. 06/2013; 20(6):601–607.
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and uric acid (UA) levels increase early during chronic kidney disease (CKD). The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between these two parameters at different stages of pediatric CKD. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred patients (range, 5-18 years) were included in this retrospective study: they had undergone renal exploration with a direct measurement of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using the reference standard (i.e., inulin clearance, Cin) and presented with increased circulating levels of PTH and/or UA. RESULTS: GFR was normal in 39% of patients, with UA increased in 44% and PTH in 75% of them. Interestingly, 29% of the children with increased PTH levels had a strictly normal GFR (i.e., above 90mL/min/1.73m(2)). An inverse association was found between UA and GFR (r=-0.452, P≤0.0001) as well as between PTH and GFR (r=-0.226, P=0.024). The same negative relationships were found between UA and PTH (r=-0.266, P=0.007), and between UA and the phosphate reabsorption rate (r=-0.415, P<0.001). DISCUSSION: Since hyperuricemia was found at all stages of CKD, an early silent tubular impairment can be discussed to explain these findings. The early increase in PTH levels during CKD has not been described by all authors, with North American studies describing rather late increased PTH levels during CKD. Prospective studies are required to confirm these data and evaluate the role of UA in the pathophysiology of the mineral disorders observed during CKD.
    Archives de Pédiatrie 04/2013; · 0.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Sclerostin, a bone antianabolic peptide involved in osteoporosis, is elevated in patients undergoing maintenance dialysis. However, there are no data for patients with early CKD. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: Between January and July 2010, serum sclerostin and GFR (calculated by inulin clearance) were measured in 90 patients with CKD. Fasting blood samples were also drawn for determination of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, bone alkaline phosphatase, and 25-OH vitamin D. RESULTS: Median GFR was 66.5 (interquartile range, 40.0-88.3) ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Median sclerostin level was 53.5 (interquartile range, 37.5-77.2) pmol/L, was higher in patients with a GFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), and was highest in those with ESRD. Sclerostin levels were significantly more elevated in men than women (P<0.05). An inverse relationship was found between sclerostin and GFR (r=-0.58; P<0.001), and a positive correlation was seen with age (r=0.34; P<0.01) and serum phosphate (r=0.26; P=0.02). In multiple regression analyses, GFR, sex, and serum phosphate were the only variables associated with serum sclerostin (P<0.001). Age lost its relationship with sclerostin level. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study reporting higher serum sclerostin levels starting at CKD stage III. GFR, sex, and serum phosphate were the only measures associated with sclerostin level, suggesting that the effect of age reported in the literature might instead be attributable to the altered renal function in the elderly. Correcting the serum phosphorus level may be associated with lower sclerostin levels.
    Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 02/2013; · 5.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Data on long-term outcomes after pediatric renal transplantation (Tx) are still limited. We report on a 20-year single-center experience. Medical charts of all consecutive pediatric Tx performed between 1987 and 2007 were reviewed. Data of patients who had been transferred to adult units were extracted from the French databases of renal replacement therapies. Outcomes were assessed using Kaplan-Meier and Cox models. Two hundred forty Tx were performed in 219 children (24.1% pre-emptive and 17.5% living related donor Tx). Median age at Tx was 11.1 years and median follow-up was 10.4 years. Patient survival was 94%, 92%, and 91% at 5, 10, and 15 years post-Tx, respectively. Overall, transplant survival was 92%, 82%, 72%, and 59% at 1, 5, 10, and 15 years post-Tx, respectively. The expected death-censored graft half-life was 20 years. Sixteen patients developed malignancies during follow-up. Median height at 18 years of age was 166 cm in boys and 152 cm in girls with 68% of patients being in the normal range. The proportion of socially disadvantaged young people was higher than in general population. Excellent long-term outcomes can be achieved in pediatric renal Tx, but specific problems such as malignancies, growth, and social outcome remain challenging.
    Transplant International 12/2012; · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The utility of serum cystatin C (SCysC) as a filtration marker in kidney transplantation is uncertain. We took advantage of the recent validation of a reference calibrator for SCysC and of newly developed CKD-EPI (Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration) equations (2012) expressed for use with standardized SCysC level to reassess the performance of SCysC as a filtration marker in kidney transplant recipients. STUDY DESIGN: Study of diagnostic test accuracy. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: 670 kidney transplant recipients from 3 centers undergoing glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measurements from December 2006 to November 2012. INDEX TEST: Estimated GFR (eGFR) using the 2012 SCysC-based and serum creatinine (SCr)/SCysC-based CKD-EPI equations (eGFR(cys) and eGFR(cr-cys), respectively) and the 2009 SCr-based CKD-EPI equation (eGFR(cr)), with SCysC and SCr measured at a single laboratory between April 2011 and June 2011. REFERENCE TEST: Measured GFR (mGFR) using urinary clearance of inulin. RESULTS: Bias (the difference between mGFR and eGFR) was significantly smaller for eGFR(cys) and eGFR(cr-cys) versus eGFR(cr) (-2.82 and -0.54 vs +4.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2), respectively; P < 0.001). Precision (standard deviation of the mean bias) also was better for eGFR(cys) and eGFR(cr-cys) versus eGFR(cr) (12 and 11 vs 13 mL/min/1.73 m(2) [P < 0.001 for both comparisons]). Accuracy (percentage of GFR estimates within 30% of mGFR) was greater for eGFR(cys) and eGFR(cr-cys) versus eGFR(cr) (81% and 86% vs 75%, respectively [P = 0.004 and P < 0.001]). Net reclassification index with respect to mGFR of 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) for eGFR(cr-cys) and eGFR(cys) versus eGFR(cr) was 18.8% [95% CI, 8.6%-28.9%] and 22.5% [95% CI, 10.2%-34.9%]. LIMITATIONS: Patients were exclusively of European descent; association with transplant outcome was not evaluated. CONCLUSIONS: Our data validate the use of both the newly developed SCysC-based and SCr/SCysC-based CKD-EPI equations (2012) in kidney transplant recipients. Both equations perform better than the SCr-based CKD-EPI equation (2009).
    American Journal of Kidney Diseases 11/2012; · 5.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It has been suggested that plasma cystatin C (Cyst-C) concentrations provide better indicators of changes in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) than plasma creatinine concentration (PCr). We compared the performance of five equations-2009 Schwartz, Local Schwartz, Larsson, Le Bricon, and Schwartz Combined-in 60 renal transplant children by calculating the mean bias, Pearson correlation coefficient (R) and determination (R(2)), 10% (P10) and 30% (P30) accuracies, and Bland-Altman plots. GFR was measured by inulin clearance. For the whole population, R(2) was slightly lower for formulas based on Cyst-C or PCr, but the mean bias was lower, and P10 and P30 were greater, than using combined Schwartz equation. However, the mean estimated GFR by Schwartz 2009, Local Schwartz, and Schwartz combined equations was not statistically different from the mean inulin clearance measurement. In our pediatric transplant population, the combined Schwartz formula exhibited better performance to estimate GFR than formulae based on Cyst-C or combined PCr.
    Transplantation Proceedings 10/2012; 44(8):2357-9. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in children is often regarded as a benign condition. However, previous studies pointed out renal-related anomalies which may benefit from early appropriate treatments. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence and severity of early renal dysfunction in ADPKD children. An extensive renal evaluation was performed in 52 consecutive ADPKD patients diagnosed either from prenatal screening or post-natal ultrasound (US) examination (54 % males, mean age 10 ± 4 years [1-17]). Three patients had both systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure above the 95th percentile, one patient had a "high normal" DBP, and one child was treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI). The mean ± SD glomerular filtration rate (GFR ml/min per 1.73 m(2), inulin clearance) was 115 ± 26 [47-168] but six children (12 %) had a GFR < 90 and 11 (21 %) experienced hyperfiltration (GFR > 135). Microalbuminuria (2 < Ualb/Ucr ≤ 20 mg/mmol) was found in 25 patients and five had macroalbuminuria (>20 mg/mmol). Early renal manifestations are frequent in ADPKD children, including hypertension in 6 %, albuminuria in 58 %, and decreased GFR in 12 %. In conclusion, renal function in children with ADPKD should be regularly assessed in order to manage early renal dysfunction and even consider further therapeutic intervention.
    Pediatric Nephrology 06/2012; 27(9):1589-93. · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Deferasirox (DFX) is an oral iron chelator with an established dose-dependent efficacy in transfusion-related iron overload. Whereas emerging long-term data confirm the safety of the drug, with transient moderate elevation of serum creatinine level, several authors have reported renal tubular dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate tubular and glomerular function before and after the initiation of DFX therapy in a pediatric patient population. Ten children (4 girls, mean age 12.4 ± 3.9 years) enrolled in a routine blood transfusion program were treated with 24.8 ± 9.6 mg/kg per day of DFX, and renal function was assessed before and 17.2 ± 8.9 months after the initiation of DFX therapy. Prior to treatment with DFX, all patients had a normal glomerular function rate (GFR) (125 ± 15 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) and normal tubular function. Following the initiation of DFX therapy, the GFR decreased by approximately 20 % with one patient with a GFR of <80 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) and seven patients with a GFR of <100 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Two patients experienced a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction whereas nine patients presented at least one sign of proximal tubular dysfunction. Renal toxicity is a frequent adverse event of DFX treatment, presenting as both glomerular and proximal dysfunction. A routine renal assessment is therefore required to prevent chronic kidney disease that may result from prolonged tubular injury.
    Pediatric Nephrology 04/2012; 27(11):2115-22. · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The performance of creatinine-based equations to obtain the estimated GFR in adolescents and young adults is poorly understood. We assessed creatinine-based GFR estimating equations in a cross-section of 751 adolescents and young adults (1054 measurements), using inulin clearance (measured GFR [mGFR]) as the reference method. We evaluated the following: Cockcroft-Gault, four-variable Modified Diet in Renal Disease, and the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations for adult participants, as well as the Schwartz 2009 and Schwartz-Lyon equations for pediatric age groups. Participants ranged in age from 10 to 26 years (mean 16.8 years); we divided the population into four groups according to age (10-12 years, 13-17 years, 18-21 years, and 21-25 years). Evaluation of the agreement between these formulas and mGFR (e.g., correlation, Bland-Altman plots, bias, and accuracy) showed that there was a good correlation between mGFR and both pediatric formulas in all age groups, whereas the adult formulas substantially overestimated mGFR. In conclusion, we recommend the use of pediatric equations to estimate GFR from childhood to early adulthood.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 04/2012; 23(6):989-96. · 8.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Plasma-creatinine-based equations to estimate the glomerular filtration rate are recommended by several clinical guidelines. In 2009, Schwartz et al. adapted the traditional Schwartz equation to children and adolescents but did not find different k-coefficients between children and adolescents (k = 36.5 for all patients). We reevaluated the coefficient of the 2009-Schwartz formula according to sex and age in a pediatric population. We used linear mixed-effects models to reestimate the 2009-Schwartz k-coefficient in 360 consecutive French subjects aged 1 to 18 years referred to a single centre between July 2003 and July 2010 (965 measurements). We assessed the agreement between the estimated glomerular filtration rate obtained with the new formula (called Schwartz-Lyon) and the rate measured by inulin clearance. We then compared this agreement to the one between the measured glomerular filtration rate and 2009-Schwartz formula, first in the French then in a Swedish cohort. In Schwartz-Lyon formula, k was estimated at 32.5 in boys <13 years and all girls and at 36.5 in boys aged ≥13 years. The performance of this formula was higher than that of 2009-Schwartz formula in children <13 years. This was first supported by a statistically significant reduction of the overestimation of the measured glomerular filtration rate in both cohorts, by better 10% and 30% accuracies, and by a better concordance correlation coefficient. The performance and simplicity of Schwartz formula are strong arguments for its routine use in children and adolescents. The specific coefficient for children aged <13 years further improves this performance.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(12):e53439. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The management of kidney transplant recipients requires accurate estimate of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). This study aims at evaluating the performance of four creatinine-based formulas for estimating the GFR (estimated GFR) in this population. Performances of Cockcroft and Gault formula, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) simplified formula, Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration formula, and Nankivell formula were assessed compared with inulin clearance taken as the gold standard for measuring GFR (measured GFR). Performances were assessed using the first measurements of GFR obtained in 1249 subjects. How estimated GFR tracks changes in measured GFR over time since transplantation in those patients with repeated measures was also assessed. The MDRD formula provided the best estimate of GFR with a mean bias of -0.5 mL/min/1.73 m, a standard deviation of bias of 12 mL/min/1.73 m, and a 30% accuracy at 85%. The MDRD formula also seemed to provide the best performance for estimating GFR, irrespective of age, stage of renal failure, and in people whose body mass index was more than 18.5 kg/m. This robustness is important in clinical practice. The performance of the four formulas was not modified by the posttransplant period. Even if 30% accuracy was suboptimal in the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines, our results, obtained in a large number of patients, lead us to recommend using the MDRD formula to monitor GFR in kidney transplant recipients.
    Transplantation 11/2011; 92(9):1005-11. · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pregnancy during dialysis is a high-risk condition which is becoming more and more common. The renal outcome of children born from such pregnancies needs to be investigated since renal development may be affected (i.e. exposure to uraemic toxins, therapies, intermittent haemodynamic changes during sessions, prematurity, growth retardation). We performed a single-centre prospective global and renal evaluation (inulin clearance or 2009 Schwartz formula in children <4 years) in 10 children from 7 mothers who underwent haemodialysis during pregnancy. The median (range) age of mothers at the beginning of pregnancy was 30 (22-33) years, with maximal weekly haemodialysis duration of 18 (12-30) h. Systemic arterial hypertension was reported in 4 of 10 pregnancies, polyhydramnios in 3 and oligohydramnios in 1. The median (range) gestational age was 32 (29-39) weeks of gestation (WG). Seven children were born before 36 WG. The median (range) birth weight (BW) was 1735 (930-3430)g, and eight children had a BW <2500 g. One child had a PAX2 mutation requiring early renal transplantation and was thus excluded from further analysis. Even though glomerular filtration rate and blood pressure were normal in all other children, a significant urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio was found in three children and an increased urine beta-2-microglobulin concentration in an additional one, questioning the presence of an underlying silent reduction in nephron number. Despite the small number of patients, this pilot study highlights the potential risk of renal impairment in children born from dialysed mothers. Further studies are required but until then, careful monitoring of these children is important.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 11/2011; 27(6):2365-9. · 3.37 Impact Factor
  • Néphrologie & Thérapeutique 09/2011; 7(5):290-291. · 0.50 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

637 Citations
227.01 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2014
    • Hospices Civils de Lyon
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 1995–2013
    • CHU de Lyon - Groupement Hospitalier Edouard Herriot
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 2010–2011
    • CHU de Lyon - Hôpital Femme-Mère-Enfant
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      Los Angeles, California, United States
  • 2009–2010
    • CHU de Lyon - Hôpital Gériatrique Antoine Charial 
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
    • University of Lyon
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 1998–2008
    • Claude Bernard University Lyon 1
      Villeurbanne, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 2002
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France
  • 2001
    • French Institute of Health and Medical Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France