J M Carrascosa

Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Catalonia, Spain

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Publications (115)75.59 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A great amount of information on systemic and biologic therapies for moderate to severe psoriasis is now available. However, applying the evidence in numerous clinical scenarios has engendered debate; under these circumstances, the consensus of experts is useful.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective In this study, we have performed a direct comparison between both T-cell based assays (QFN-G-IT and T-SPOT.TB) and TST in patients with psoriasis taking different immunosuppressant drug-regimens. Methods We have prospectively studied 103 patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis who required latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) screening before starting systemic immunosuppressive treatment or during its sustained use. Results Overall number of positive results was 16.5%, 17.5% and 8.7% using T-SPOT.TB, QFN-G-IT and TST respectively. Differences in the percentage of positive results between TST with T-SPOT.TB and QFN-G-IT were significant (p=0.005 and p=0.008, respectively). A total of 24.3% of the subjects enrolled were positive for at least one of the three tests performed. Sixteen patients with negative TST (17%) were positive for one of the two IGRAs. We obtained seven indeterminate results by T-SPOT.TB and two by QFN-G-IT. Seven patients with negative TST presented indeterminate results by either of two IFN-γ assays. Positive TST, T-SPOT.TB and QFN-G-IT results were not affected by clinical therapeutic profile. Conclusions Our results reveal that in vitro assays are useful methods for LTBI diagnosis in patients with psoriasis, suggesting that they might be less influenced by immunosuppression than TST.
    Journal of Infection 12/2014; · 4.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lupus erythematosus tumidus (LET) is a subtype of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) that has been well characterized in recent years. However, some controversy still remains concerning the histological features of epidermal involvement. The objective of this report is to describe the clinical and microscopic features of LET in patients diagnosed at Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Spain. We conducted a retrospective study of 25 patients with a diagnosis of LET. All patients presented with typical LET lesions (smooth, erythematous plaques without macroscopic epidermal changes, such as follicular plugs or scale, that resolved without residual scarring or hypopigmentation). None of the patients fulfilled the criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus during follow-up. Test results for antinuclear antibodies were positive in five patients (20%), with titres below one of 320 in all cases. Twenty-two patients (88%) required antimalarial therapy; response was good in 70% and moderate response in 30%. Minor epidermal alterations were observed in 52% of biopsy specimens, with focal basal vacuolization being the most frequent. LET is a variant of CLE that has distinctive clinical, histologic and prognostic features. Unlike the patients in the case series previously described in the literature, most of our patients required treatment with antimalarials. Histology revealed mild epidermal alterations in a significant percentage of patients. Thus, in our opinion, the absence of microscopic epidermal alterations is not constant in LET. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.
    Lupus 11/2014; · 2.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in psoriasis has not been studied in large Spanish samples. Objective: To assess the prevalence of major CVRFs in psoriasis patients requiring systemic treatments. Material and Methods: Cross-sectional study in psoriasis patients from 33 hospital dermatology offices throughout Spain. Blood pressure (BP) was measured and a fasting lab test was performed. Each CVRF was diagnosed according to the recommendations of international societies. Results: In 368 patients (mean age 48 years old, 36% women), 80.2% had at least one CVRF. The prevalence of each CVRF was similar in men and women and slightly higher in patients with psoriatic arthritis and in patients with a history of more severe disease. The percentage of patients treated with drugs to control CVRF was low (∼50% of those with each CVRF). A total of 20.7% had experienced some cardiovascular disease (CVD) episode. Conclusion: The prevalence of CVRF was high, higher than in the general Spanish population, and 20% had already suffered CVD. However, the percentage with drug treatments for CVRF was low.
    European journal of dermatology: EJD 10/2014; · 1.95 Impact Factor
  • L Puig, J M Carrascosa
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 10/2014; 105S1:1-5.
  • J.M. Carrascosa, J. Notario
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 10/2014;
  • J M Carrascosa, L Puig
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 10/2014; 105S1:6-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Background Psoriasis patients over 65 years-old (elderly) constitute a growing group, underrepresented in clinical trials, and likely to be more prone to adverse events.Objective To describe safety of systemic psoriasis therapy in patients over 65 years-old compared to younger patients.Methods Patients registered in Biobadaderm, a Spanish national registry of psoriasis patients treated with systemic therapy, were grouped in elderly (≥ 65 years old) and younger patients. Rates of adverse events were described by severity and type, and the risks compared in both groups, taking into account exposure to classic or biologic drugs, using Cox regression.Results175 (9.8%) of 1793 patients were elderly. Overall risk of adverse events was not higher in elderly (drug group adjusted HR 1.09 (95%CI: 0.93-1.3)). Serious adverse events were more common in elderly (drug group adjusted HR 3.2 (95%CI: 2.0-5.1)). Age adjusted HR of all adverse events was lower for patients exposed to biologics compared to classic drugs in the whole sample (HR 0.7 (95%CI: 0.6-0.7)). Age did not seem to modify the effect of therapy (biologic vs. classic) in the risk of adverse events (likelihood ratio test for interaction, p = 0.12 for all adverse events, p = 0-09 for serious adverse events).Conclusions Serious adverse events are more common in elderly patients, although they may be related to other variants that are associated with this age group and not due to the treatment itself. Use of biologics was associated with lower risk of adverse events in the whole group. We found no differences in this association between young and elderly. These results are reassuring, although uncontrolled confounding could not be excluded as an explanation for these findings, and the power of the study to detect differences was low.
    Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 09/2014; · 2.69 Impact Factor
  • J M Carrascosa, J Notario
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Biological drugs such as the tumour necrosis factor inhibitors have revolutionized the treatment of psoriasis, but some have the potential to induce an unwanted immune response. This immunogenicity may be associated with low trough drug levels, reduced clinical efficacy, reduced drug survival and an increased risk for adverse events. This article presents a literature review of the evidence on immunogenicity of biologics used in the treatment of psoriasis and considers the implications for therapeutic decision-making in the management of patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis.
    Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 05/2014; · 2.69 Impact Factor
  • Y. Gilaberte, J.M. Carrascosa
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    ABSTRACT: One of the main goals of all skin cancer prevention campaigns is to protect children from ultraviolet radiation. However, little is known about how sun exposure risks differ between adults and children or about how these risks are best managed. Children's skin is more susceptible to sun damage for a number of reasons, including certain anatomical and functional aspects in children under 2 years of age and habits that predispose to greater sun exposure during the first 2 decades of life. Oil-based emulsions containing inorganic filters appear to be safest sunscreens for children, although the addition of certain organic filters is necessary to achieve a sun protection factor of 50. Oxybenzone, and probably also octocrylene, should be avoided in sunscreens for children. Sunscreen use should be part of an overall sun protection strategy that includes avoidance of exposure to midday sun and the use of protective clothing and hats. The above considerations justify the implementation of primary prevention campaigns focused on sun protection education for children and the continuation of basic and epidemiological research into specific sun protection strategies and sunscreens for each age group.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 04/2014; 105(3):253–262.
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    ABSTRACT: Background Biobadaderm is the Spanish registry of psoriasis patients receiving systemic treatment in clinical practice.Objective To compare the safety of biologics and classic systemic treatment.Methods Prospective cohort of patients receiving biologics and classic systemic therapies between 2008 and 2013 in 12 hospitals are included. We registered demographic data, diagnoses, comorbidities, treatments and adverse events (AE). We obtained raw relative risks (RR) for specific AE. Multivariate analysis consisted of Cox models adjusting for age, gender, chronic hepatic disease and previous cancer.ResultsA total of 1030 patients received biologics (2061 AE in 3681 person-years), 926 patients classic systemic drugs (1015 AE in 1517 person-years). Ninety-three per cent of AE in both groups were non-serious, 6% serious and 0.003% fatal. The age- and gender-adjusted hazard ratio of AE was lower in the biologics group [hazard ratio 0.6 (95% CI: 0.5–0.7)].We found no differences in rates of serious and mortal AE. Some system organ class AE rates differed between both groups. As limitations: Prescription bias might affect the incidence of AE in both groups. Association of drug and AE was based on timing: associations might not be causal.Conclusion Patients receiving biologics had lower risk of AE. We did not find differences in the risk of serious or fatal AE.
    Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 03/2014; · 2.69 Impact Factor
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    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 03/2014;
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    C Ferrándiz, J M Carrascosa, M Toro
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of psoriasis in Spain was estimated to be 1.4% before the advent of biologic agents. Fifteen years later, new therapeutic options based on biologic agents have led to greater awareness of the disease and better understanding; case detection and diagnosis may have improved as a result. To investigate the current prevalence of psoriasis in Spain and compare the results with those of an earlier study that used the same methodology. Population-based cross-sectional survey. Information was collected through computer-assisted telephone interviews with a randomly selected representative sample of the Spanish population (12,711 individuals from 4,754 households). Interviews were conducted by trained personnel using a questionnaire. The prevalence was 2.3% and there were no statistically significant differences between the sexes. Prevalence increased with age (range with highest prevalence, 60-69 years). Central Spain-a region with a cold, dry climate-had the highest prevalence, but differences between regions were not significant. Psoriasis is substantially more prevalent in Spain than was previously estimated. The increase in prevalence may reflect greater awareness and better diagnosis of the disease rather than a true increase in number of cases.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 02/2014;
  • Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis, a chronic inflammatory musculoskeletal disease that is associated with psoriasis, causes joint erosions, accompanied by loss of function and quality of life. The clinical presentation is variable, with extreme phenotypes that can mimic rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. Because psoriasis usually presents before psoriatic arthritis, the dermatologist plays a key role in early detection of the latter. As many treatments used in psoriasis are also used in psoriatic arthritis, treatment recommendations should take into consideration the type and severity of both conditions. This consensus paper presents guidelines for the coordinated management of psoriatic arthritis by rheumatologists and dermatologists. The paper was drafted by a multidisciplinary group (6 rheumatologists, 6 dermatologists, and 2 epidemiologists) using the Delphi method and contains recommendations, tables, and algorithms for the diagnosis, referral, and treatment of patients with psoriatic arthritis.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 01/2014; 105(3):216–232.
  • S. Ros, L. Puig, J.M. Carrascosa
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    ABSTRACT: We now realize that moderate to severe psoriasis takes a toll on the patient's overall health beyond the effects on the skin itself, and so we use quality of life (QOL) measures to assess how the individual perceives both the impact of disease and the response to treatment. However, available instruments give us a cross-sectional assessment of QOL at a specific moment, and we lack longitudinal studies of how a disease affects each and every aspect of a patient's life over time—including physical and psychological wellbeing, social and emotional relationships, vocational and employment decisions, and how they change the individual's outlook. A new concept, cumulative life course impairment (CLCI), captures the notion of the ongoing effect of a disease, providing us with a new paradigm for assessing the impact of psoriasis on QOL. Unlike conventional measurement tools and scales, which focus on a specific moment in the patient's life, a CLCI tool investigates the repercussions of disease that accumulate over a lifetime, interfering with the individual's full potential development and altering perspectives that might have been different had psoriasis not been present. The accumulated impact will vary from patient to patient depending on circumstances that interact differently over time as the burden of stigmatization, concomitant physical and psychological conditions associated with psoriasis, coping mechanisms, and external factors come into play and are modulated by the individual's personality.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 01/2014; 105(2):128–134.
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, is currently considered a chronic low-grade inflammatory condition that plays an active role in the development of the pathophysiologic phenomena responsible for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease through the secretion of proinflammatory adipokines and cytokines. In recent years clear genetic, pathogenic, and epidemiologic links have been established between psoriasis and obesity, with important implications for health. The relationship between the 2 conditions is probably bidirectional, with obesity predisposing to psoriasis and psoriasis favoring obesity. Obesity also has important implications in the treatment of psoriasis, such as a greater risk of adverse effects with conventional systemic drugs and reduced efficacy and/or increased cost with biologic agents, for which dosage should be adjusted to the patient's weight.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 01/2014; 105(1):31–44.
  • C. Ferrándiz, J.M. Carrascosa, M. Toro
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction The prevalence of psoriasis in Spain was estimated to be 1.4% before the advent of biologic agents. Fifteen years later, new therapeutic options based on biologic agents have led to greater awareness of the disease and better understanding; case detection and diagnosis may have improved as a result. Objective To investigate the current prevalence of psoriasis in Spain and compare the results with those of an earlier study that used the same methodology. Material and methods Population-based cross-sectional survey. Information was collected through computer-assisted telephone interviews with a randomly selected representative sample of the Spanish population (12,711 individuals from 4,754 households). Interviews were conducted by trained personnel using a questionnaire. Results The prevalence was 2.3% and there were no statistically significant differences between the sexes. Prevalence increased with age (range with highest prevalence, 60-69 years). Central Spain—a region with a cold, dry climate—had the highest prevalence, but differences between regions were not significant. Conclusions Psoriasis is substantially more prevalent in Spain than was previously estimated. The increase in prevalence may reflect greater awareness and better diagnosis of the disease rather than a true increase in number of cases.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: La terapia biológica representa una alternativa bien establecida en el manejo de la psoriasis moderada y grave. Sin embargo, su elevado coste, la experiencia relativamente limitada en su empleo clínico y la abundancia de publicaciones existentes hacen necesario el desarrollo de unas directrices basadas en la evidencia científica disponible y en el consenso de un grupo de expertos. El objetivo ideal del tratamiento de la psoriasis es conseguir y mantener a largo plazo un blanqueamiento completo o prácticamente completo o, en su defecto, una mínima afectación localizada y controlable con tratamientos tópicos. Aunque la evidencia disponible permite comparar de forma directa o indirecta la eficacia y las posibilidades de fracaso terapéutico primario o secundario de los diferentes fármacos según parámetros objetivos, las limitaciones en la extrapolación de los ensayos clínicos a la clínica diaria condicionan que la elección del fármaco y de la pauta de administración se realicen de forma individualizada en función de las características de cada paciente. La presente actualización de las directrices para el tratamiento de la psoriasis con agentes biológicos de la Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología (AEDV) incorpora la información más reciente disponible a este respecto.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 10/2013; 104(8):694–709.

Publication Stats

372 Citations
75.59 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1996–2014
    • Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol
      • Department of Dermatology
      Badalona, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2013
    • Hospital Clínic de Barcelona
      • Servicio de Reumatología
      Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
    • Aragon Health Sciences Institute
      Caesaraugusta, Aragon, Spain
  • 2009–2013
    • Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2011
    • University of Barcelona
      • Departament de Biologia Cel·lular
      Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2010
    • Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
      Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain
    • Hospital Universitario de La Princesa
      • Servicio de Dermatología
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2007
    • Hospital Universitari Arnau de Vilanova
      Lérida, Catalonia, Spain
    • Complexo Hospitalario De Pontevedra
      Pontevedra, Galicia, Spain