Marja Mikkelsson

Päijät-Hämeen Central Hospital, Lahti, Southern Finland Province, Finland

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Publications (45)132.2 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Full text: http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/6WNS9HjT5iaSAFY6hDXs/full Participating in competitive sport increases the risk for injuries and musculoskeletal pain among adolescent athletes. There is also evidence that the use of prescription drugs has increased among sport club athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of painkillers among young male ice hockey players (IHP) in comparison to schoolboys (controls) and its relation to the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and problems during activities and sleeping. Information was gathered through a questionnaire, completed by 121 IHP and compared to the responses of 618 age-matched controls. Results showed that monthly existing pain was at 82% for IHP, and 72% for controls, though IHP had statistically more musculoskeletal pain in their lower limbs (56% versus 44%), lower back (54% versus 35%), and buttocks (26% versus 11%). There were no group differences in the neck, upper back, upper limb, or chest areas. The disability index was statistically similar for both groups, as musculoskeletal pain causing difficulties in daily activities and sleeping was reported by a minority of subjects. Despite this similarity, IHP used more painkillers than controls (18% versus 10%). Further nuanced research is encouraged to compare athletes and non-athletes in relation to painkillers.
    Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine. 04/2014; 2(1):448-454.
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    ABSTRACT: The impact of early degenerative changes of the cervical spine on pain in adulthood is unknown. The objective was to determine whether degeneration in adolescence predicts headache or neck pain in young adulthood. As part of a follow-up of schoolchildren with and without headache, 17-year-old adolescents with headache at least three times a month ( N = 47) and adolescents with no headache ( N = 22) participated in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of the cervical spine. The same adolescents were re-examined by phone interview at the age of 22 years ( N = 60/69, 87%). Mild disc degeneration at the age of 17 years was common, but was not associated with either frequent or intensive headache or neck pain at the age of 22 years. Mild degenerative changes of the cervical spine in 17-year-old adolescents cannot be regarded as a cause of future headache or neck pain.
    Cephalalgia 02/2014; · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Participating in competitive sport increases the risk for injuries and musculoskeletal pain among adolescent athletes. There is also evidence that the use of prescription drugs has increased among sport club athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of painkillers among young male ice hockey players (IHP) in comparison to schoolboys (controls) and its relation to the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and problems during activities and sleeping. Information was gathered through a questionnaire, completed by 121 IHP and compared to the responses of 618 age-matched controls. Results showed that monthly existing pain was at 82% for IHP, and 72% for controls, though IHP had statistically more musculoskeletal pain in their lower limbs (56% versus 44%), lower back (54% versus 35%), and buttocks (26% versus 11%). There were no group differences in the neck, upper back, upper limb, or chest areas. The disability index was statistically similar for both groups, as musculoskeletal pain causing difficulties in daily activities and sleeping was reported by a minority of subjects. Despite this similarity, IHP used more painkillers than controls (18% versus 10%). Further nuanced research is encouraged to compare athletes and non-athletes in relation to painkillers.
    Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background: There is some evidence that the effects of stressful events experienced in childhood, adolescence and adulthood before the disease onset run a high risk of chronic pain. Several unresolved stressors, the combination of childhood abuse and current post-traumatic stress disorder substantially increase the risk of later pain. Negative life events predict weak outcomes in long term follow-up. Chronic pain as such is stressful and may increase the incidence of negative life events. Objectives: The objective of this study is to describe the long term outcomes of pain, quality of sleep, fatigue and general well-being status in juxtaposition to the experienced stressfulness of certain negative events which occurred in the lives of the subjects before the onset of fibromyalgia. Methods: The data were gathered by postal inquiry from 93 women with fibromyalgia. The mean age was 54 (SD 8), and the mean number of years after the diagnosis was 11 (SD 3). Pain, quality of sleep, fatigue and general well-being status were measured on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) of 100 mm. Questions about negative events 1-3 years before the disease onset were presented in eight areas: conflict with partner, conflict with child, close relative or friend, support for close relative or friend, physical or psychological abuse, sexual assault, disease or accident of close relative, death of close relative or friend, and financial problems. The experience of the stressfulness of the event was measured on the scale 0-3 (no event 0, event with no significantly negative effects 1, event with quite significantly negative effects 2, and event with very negative effects 3). The total scores ranged 0-27. Cronbach's alpha of the life event measure was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.61 to 0.82). The statistical significance for the hypotheses of linearity was evaluated with generalized linear models with appropriate distribution and link functions. Results: The mean sum total score of the life events was 6.2 (range 0-20). The most stressful events were financial problems (mean 1.01, SD 1.14), conflict with partner (mean 0.92, SD 1.02), and conflict with child, close relative or friend (mean 0.86, SD 1.00). The tertiles of negative life experiences differed significantly (p for linearity) in quality of sleep, fatigue and general well-being. At 11 years after the diagnosis, the VAS scores of sleep, fatigue and general well-being were the highest in the group in which the scores of experienced stressful life events were the highest. (Table 1.) Table 1. Pain, quality of sleep, fatigue and general well-being in tertiles of negative live events VAS center" colspan="3"]Tertiles of the experience of the negative life events P-value* I II III Mean (SD) Mean (SD) Mean (SD) Pain, mm 35 (22) 42 (29) 46 (29) 0.073 Sleep, mm 36 (24) 40 (29) 53 (22) 0.002 Fatigue, mm 42 (26) 51 (28) 58 (27) 0.017 General wellbeing, mm 43 (25) 53 (24) 58 (21) 0.005 *P for linearity; adjusted for age and duration of diagnosis. Conclusions: Fibromyalgia patients' economic situations and conflicts with partners have been identified as their key negative experiences. Life situations and resources must be assessed early in the diagnostic process in order to help them cope and solve their problems, thereby minimizing the effects of such problems on the symptoms in the long term. Disclosure of Interest: None Declared Citation: Ann Rheum Dis 2012;71(Suppl3):274
    Eular 2012, Berlin, Germany; 06/2012
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    ABSTRACT: In this article we explored narrated life stories of 20 women with a long history of fibromyalgia to reach a deeper understanding of how people interpret the causes and consequences of different life events and illness experiences. Based on narrative analysis, we identified three model narratives that illustrate the different life courses of women with fibromyalgia. In addition, we described a counternarrative that questions fibromyalgia as a chronic disease. In this narrative study, we give insights to the invisible symptoms and unheard experiences that are associated with fibromyalgia and to the ongoing discussion on the etiology and maintenance of fibromyalgia.
    Health Care For Women International 05/2012; 33(5):473-94. · 0.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to explore how fatigue was experienced and explained in life stories of women with a long history of fibromyalgia to gain a deeper understanding of fatigue as a phenomenon. The data was drawn from the narrative interviews of 20 purposively chosen women with fi bromyalgia. In the analysis, the ideas of episodic reading and paradigmatic analysis of narratives were used to find recurrent and repeated experiences of fatigue from the data. Five main themes emerged from the data: sleepless nights, physical weakness, loss of mental energy, social withdrawal and overwhelming exhaustion. The narratives indicated that in fi bromyalgia, fatigue is a transient, extreme and intensive experience, which causes major disability and distress and which has consequences on every aspect of life. A deeper understanding of the multi-dimensionality of fatigue may help physiotherapists and other health professionals to increase the relevance and effectiveness of the interventions aimed at fi bromyalgia patients who complain of fatigue.
    Advances in Physiotherapy 03/2011; 13:11-17.
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    ABSTRACT: Fibromyalgia is a significant health problem for women of working age. However, little is known about the long-term effects of fibromyalgia in everyday life or on work ability. A narrative interview study was conducted to explore the experiences of work ability and functioning of patients with a long history of fibromyalgia. Twenty women, aged 34-65 years, were purposively chosen for the interviews, to reach a wide range of patients with different social and professional backgrounds. Four types of experience concerning work ability were identified in the narratives: confusion, coping with fluctuating symptoms, being 'in between' and being over the edge of exhaustion. Severe pain and fatigue symptoms, combined with a demanding life situation and ageing, seemed to lead to substantial decrease in work ability and functioning over the long term. In the narratives, vocational rehabilitation or adjustments to work tasks were rarely seen or were started too late to be effective. Exploring the life stories of women with fibromyalgia can reveal the perceived causes and consequences of fibromyalgia related to work ability or disability, which can be utilized in developing client-centred rehabilitation approaches and effective interventions to support work ability and avoid premature retirement in fibromyalgia patients.
    Musculoskeletal Care 10/2009; 8(1):18-26.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of single and repeated whole-body cryotherapy (WBC, air −110°C) on the neuromuscular performance in healthy subjects (n=14). The flight times in a drop-jump exercise decreased after a single WBC exposure, but these changes almost vanished after repeated WBC for 3 months. This adaptation was accompanied by a decreased co-contraction of lower leg muscles during the drop-jump. In conclusion, in dynamic exercise, neuromuscular functioning may be able to adapt to repeated WBC, which might enhance the effects of therapeutic exercises in patients after the WBC.
    Journal of Thermal Biology 07/2009; 34(5):226-231. · 1.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cold therapy is used to relieve pain and inflammatory symptoms. Humoral changes may account for the pain alleviation related to the cold exposures. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of two types of cold therapy, winter swimming in ice-cold water (WS) and whole body cryotherapy (WBC), on the serum levels of the growth hormone, prolactin, thyrotropin and free fractions of thyroid hormones (fT3, fT4). One group of healthy females (n = 6) was exposed to WS (water 0-2 degrees C) for 20 s and another group (n = 6) to WBC (air 110 degrees C) for 2 min, three times a week for 12 weeks. Blood samples used for the hormone measurements were taken on weeks 1, 4 and 12 before and 35 min after the cold exposures and on the days of the respective weeks, when the cold exposures were not performed. During the WS treatments, serum thyrotropin increased significantly at 35 min on weeks 1 (p < 0.01) and 4 (p < 0.05), but the responses were within the health-related reference interval. During the WS, the serum prolactin measured at 35 min on week 12 was lower than during the control treatment, and no changes in fT3 or fT4 were observed. During the WBC, no changes in the serum levels of the studied hormones were observed during the 12 weeks. In conclusion, repeated WS and WBC treatments for healthy females do not lead to disorders related to altered secretions of the growth hormone, prolactin, thyrotropin, or thyroid hormones
    Cryobiology 06/2009; 58(3):275-8. · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cold therapy is used to relieve pain and inflammatory symptoms. Humoral changes may account for the pain alleviation related to the cold exposures. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of two types of cold therapy, winter swimming in ice-cold water (WS) and whole body cryotherapy (WBC), on the serum levels of the growth hormone, prolactin, thyrotropin and free fractions of thyroid hormones (fT3, fT4). One group of healthy females (n = 6) was exposed to WS (water 0–2 °C) for 20 s and another group (n = 6) to WBC (air −110 °C) for 2 min, three times a week for 12 weeks. Blood samples used for the hormone measurements were taken on weeks 1, 4 and 12 before and 35 min after the cold exposures and on the days of the respective weeks, when the cold exposures were not performed. During the WS treatments, serum thyrotropin increased significantly at 35 min on weeks 1 (p < 0.01) and 4 (p < 0.05), but the responses were within the health-related reference interval. During the WS, the serum prolactin measured at 35 min on week 12 was lower than during the control treatment, and no changes in fT3 or fT4 were observed. During the WBC, no changes in the serum levels of the studied hormones were observed during the 12 weeks. In conclusion, repeated WS and WBC treatments for healthy females do not lead to disorders related to altered secretions of the growth hormone, prolactin, thyrotropin, or thyroid hormones.
    Cryobiology 06/2009; · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the epidemiology of widespread pain (WSP) in children and adolescents. This study aims to estimate the new-onset and prognosis of WSP in schoolchildren and investigate factors predicting its development. A prospective study was conducted among 1756 schoolchildren (age 10-12 years) in Southern Finland. At baseline, information was collected on WSP, regional musculoskeletal pain symptoms, depressiveness, fatigue, sleep problems, physical activity and joint hypermobility. These children were contacted again 1 year and 4 years later to determine the outcome and the new-onset of WSP. A total of 1282 children (73%) of the baseline study population were found at both follow-ups. Of the children who had WSP at baseline, 31% and 30% reported persistence/recurrence of symptoms at 1- and 4-year follow-up, respectively. However, only 10% of these children reported WSP at both 1 and 4 years. Of the children who were free of WSP at baseline, 18% reported new-onset WSP at 1-year follow-up and 3% reported these symptoms at both follow-up times. The independent baseline risk factors of WSP were older age (OR 1.3 95% CI 1.0-1.8), female gender (OR 1.4, 1.1-1.9), depressiveness (OR 1.5, 1.1-2.2) and regional back pain symptoms (Neck pain: OR 1.7, 1.1-2.4; Upper back pain: OR 2.1, 1.1-4.1; Lower back pain: OR 3.0, 1.6-5.7). Both psychological factors and somatic pain symptoms predict future development of WSP in adolescents.
    Pain 10/2008; 138(3):681-7. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the natural course of neck pain (NP) in 9-12-year-olds during a 4-year follow-up. Risk factors for the occurrence and persistence of weekly NP were explored separately for boys and girls. At baseline, 1756 schoolchildren completed a questionnaire eliciting musculoskeletal pain symptoms, other physical, and psychological symptoms and frequency of physical activity, and were tested for joint hypermobility. Symptoms during the preceding three months were asked using a five-level frequency classification. Re-evaluation was performed after one and four years using identical questionnaires. During follow-up, 24% reported none, 71% fluctuating, and 5% persistent weekly NP. The frequency of NP at baseline was linearly related to weekly NP during follow-up in both genders (P<0.001). Furthermore, a significant increasing linear trend towards a more persistent course of NP was seen in children with weekly other musculoskeletal and/or other physical and psychological symptoms at baseline. Among originally neck pain-free pre-/early adolescents, weekly other musculoskeletal pain symptoms (only in girls) and other physical and psychological symptoms (in both genders) predicted the occurrence of weekly NP during follow-up. In conclusion, neck pain in schoolchildren tends to fluctuate, but there also seems to exist a subgroup (5%) with persistent NP already in pre-/early adolescents, or even earlier. Co-occurrence of frequent other musculoskeletal symptoms and/or markers of psychological stress with frequent NP are risk indicators for a more persistent course, at least within next few years. Since adult chronic NP problems might originate in childhood, further studies are needed, including preventive interventions.
    Pain 08/2008; 137(2):316-22. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aggregation of low back symptoms in families of children with low back pain (LBP) has been described. However, this may be due to genetic factors or common exposure to environmental factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to childhood LBP by comparing the pairwise similarity of LBP in pairs of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twin children. Data was collected from 1995 to 1998 from a national sample of Finnish 11-year-old twins born between 1984 and 1987. This study sample constituted of 1,790 twin pairs: 610 MZ pairs, 598 same-sex DZ pairs, 582 opposite-sex DZ pairs. LBP pain was determined by using a validated pain questionnaire designed to assess musculoskeletal pains during the preceding 3 months. The outcome measure, LBP, was considered in three categories: none, once a month and at least once a week. Twin similarity in the report of LBP was quantified by correlations. Variance components for genetic and environmental factors were estimated by using biometric structural equation modelling techniques. The prevalence of LBP at least once a month was 15.7%, and at least once a week was 6.6%. The prevalence of frequent LBP in boys was significantly higher than that in girls (P = 0.04). In both genders, there were no differences in LBP reporting by zygosity (P > 0.2). There were no statistically significant differences between polychoric correlations in male MZ and DZ pairs and between polychoric correlations in female MZ and DZ pairs, suggesting little genetic influence. Results obtained from the best-fitting genetic model suggests that, of the total variance in LBP, 41% (95% CI 34-48) could be attributed to shared environmental factors within families; and 59% (52-66) to unique (unshared) environmental factors. Our results suggest that genetic factors play, at most, a minor role in LBP in children; instead, symptoms seem to be related to a mixture of shared and unshared environmental factors. This study underscore the need for further high-quality research, preferably prospective studies, to identify important modifiable risk factors in order to guide interventions that may prevent LBP in childhood.
    European Spine Journal 05/2008; 17(4):502-8. · 2.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cold therapy is used to relieve pain and inflammatory symptoms. The present study was designed to determine the influence of long-term regular exposure to acute cold temperature. Two types of exposure were studied: winter swimming in ice-cold water and whole-body cryotherapy. The outcome was investigated on humoral factors that may account for pain alleviation related to the exposures. During the course of 12 weeks, 3 times a week, a group of healthy females (n = 10) was exposed to winter swimming (water 0-2 degrees C) for 20 s and another group (n = 10) to whole-body cryotherapy (air -110 degrees C) for 2 min in a special chamber. Blood specimens were drawn in weeks 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12, on a day when no cold exposure occurred (control specimens) and on a day of cold exposures (cold specimens) before the exposures (0 min), and thereafter at 5 and 35 min. Plasma ACTH and cortisol in weeks 4-12 on time-points 35 min were significantly lower than in week 1, probably due to habituation, suggesting that neither winter swimming nor whole-body cryotherapy stimulated the pituitary-adrenal cortex axis. Plasma epinephrine was unchanged during both experiments, but norepinephrine showed significant 2-fold to 3-fold increases each time for 12 weeks after both cold exposures. Plasma IL-1-beta, IL-6 or TNF alpha did not show any changes after cold exposure. The main finding was the sustained cold-induced stimulation of norepinephrine, which was remarkably similar between exposures. The frequent increase in norepinephrine might have a role in pain alleviation in whole-body cryotherapy and winter swimming.
    Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation 02/2008; 68(2):145-53. · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the study was to find out what kind of neck pain (NP) is associated with headache (HA) and with various headache variables: frequency, type, intensity, disturbance, and relief with analgesics. A population-based sample of 12-year-olds with and without HA (n = 304) was followed for 4 years. At the age of 16 years, NP was evaluated on the basis of self-reported symptoms and a thorough physical examination of the neck region. Both self-reported and measured NP were associated with HA variables. Co-occurrent NP was found in adolescents with migraine as often as in those with tension-type HA. Especially, muscle pain and intensive, frequent NP were associated with disturbing HA unresponsive to analgesics. The study indicates that concomitant NP should be considered in adolescent HA sufferers, and a thorough cervical and muscle evaluation is recommended when planning the treatment of HA.
    Cephalalgia 12/2007; 27(11):1244-54. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether an observation in a UK study, that persons with chronic widespread pain are at long-term increased risk of cancer mortality, can be replicated in a different setting. Subjects were participants aged >or=30 yrs in the Mini-Finland Health Survey conducted between 1979 and 1980. Information collected included prevalent pains at different joints throughout the body, demographic, anthropometric, lifestyle and occupational factors. During follow-up, until 1994, information on vital status and cause of death was obtained. 7182 persons participated (89.8%). The prevalence of widespread body pain (pain at four or more sites) was 20% in females and 12% in males, and during follow-up there were a total of 1647 deaths. The risk of death was not elevated amongst those with widespread pain [relative risk (RR): 0.86; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74-1.00], and in particular, those with widespread pain were at a slightly lower risk of several disease-specific causes of death and cancer death (RR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.46-0.91). This study of multiple pains has not confirmed a previous observation of an association between the reporting of widespread pain and subsequent increased risk of cancer death. Differences in the definitions used or, more probably, the population studied, in particular, a larger rural population with more multiple pains related to physical activity may account for the differences.
    Rheumatology 05/2007; 46(5):805-7. · 4.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to examine the influence of concomitant neck pain (NP) on the outcome of headache (HA) frequency and HA type in adolescence. A population-based sample of 13-year-olds with or without HA (n = 228) was followed for 3 years. NP was evaluated at the beginning of the follow-up on the basis of recorded muscle tenderness and self-reported symptoms. During the 3 years of follow-up, changes in both HA type and frequency were common. NP interfering with daily activities at the age of 13 years predicted change from non-frequent (0-1/month) to monthly HA (>1/month), especially in boys (P = 0.03 boys, P = 0.06 girls). The use of physiotherapy predicted persistence of monthly HA in boys (P = 0.004). The changes in HA type were not predictable by NP. In conclusion, the risk of worsening HA in adolescence is more probable if the HA is associated with NP interfering with daily activities.
    Cephalalgia 04/2007; 27(3):244-53. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the study was to determine whether adolescents with headache have more disc degeneration in the cervical spine than headache-free controls. This study is part of a population-based follow-up study of adolescents with and without headache. At the age of 17 years, adolescents with headache at least three times a month (N = 47) and adolescents with no headache (N = 22) participated in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of the cervical spine. Of the 47 headache sufferers, 17 also had weekly neck pain and 30 had neck pain less than once a month. MRI scans were interpreted independently by three neuroradiologists. Disc degeneration was found in 67% of participants, with no difference between adolescents with and without headache. Most of the degenerative changes were located in the lower cervical spine. In adolescence, mild degenerative changes of the cervical spine are surprisingly common but do not contribute to headache.
    Cephalalgia 02/2007; 27(1):14-21. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Musculoskeletal pain symptoms are common in children and adolescents. These symptoms have a negative impact on children's physical and emotional well-being, but their underlying aetiology and risk factors are still poorly understood. Most of the previous cohort studies were conducted among mid and/or late adolescents and were mainly focused on a specific pain location (e.g. low back pain or neck pain). The purpose of this study is to estimate occurrence of new-onset pain symptoms, in all musculoskeletal locations, in preteens and early adolescents and investigate risk factors for development of these symptoms. 1756 schoolchildren (mean age 10.8) were recruited from schools in southern Finland. Information was extracted as to whether they experienced musculoskeletal pain and a total of 1192 children were identified as free of musculoskeletal pain symptoms. Information was collected on factors which could potentially predict the development of musculoskeletal pain: headache, abdominal pain, sadness/feeling down, day-time tiredness, difficulty in falling asleep, waking up during nights, level of physical activity and hypermobility. These children were followed-up 1-year later and those with new episodes of non-traumatic and traumatic musculoskeletal pain symptoms were identified. A total of 1113 schoolchildren (93% of baseline pain-free children) were found at one-year follow-up. New episodes of musculoskeletal pain were reported by 21.5% of these children. Of them 19.4% reported non-traumatic pain and 4.0% reported traumatic pain. The neck was the most commonly reported site with non-traumatic pain, while the lower limb was the most common site for traumatic pain. The independent risk factors for non-traumatic musculoskeletal pain were headache (OR = 1.68, [95% CI 1.16-2.44]) and day-time tiredness (OR = 1.53, [95% CI 1.03-2.26]). The risk factors for traumatic musculoskeletal pain were vigorous exercise (OR = 3.40 [95% CI 1.39-8.31]) and day-time tiredness (OR = 2.97 [95% CI 1.41-6.26]). This study highlights that there may be two types of pain entities with both distinct and common aspects of aetiology. For primary prevention purposes, school healthcare professionals should pay attention to preteens and early adolescents practicing vigorous exercise (predictor of traumatic pain), reporting headache (predictor of non-traumatic pain) and reporting day-time tiredness (predictor of both types of pain).
    BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 02/2007; 8:46. · 1.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sensitisation of the pain detection system has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of recurrent headache. In adults, increased sensitivity to pain has been found in patients with chronic tension type headache. Children with migraine or with unspecific headache report non-headache pains and interictal pericranial muscular tenderness more often than headache-free children. To study if children with different types of headache report non-headache pain more often than children with no headache and if extracephalic muscular tenderness is different in children with headache in comparison to headache-free children. To find out if interval to the headache episode has influence on the extracranial muscular tenderness. A population-based sample of 13-year-old children with migraine (n=48), episodic tension type headache (61) or no headache (59) were interviewed for the occurrence and characteristics of headache and fulfilled a questionnaire on non-headache pain. A structured manual palpation test on muscular tenderness and a pain threshold measurement were done on seven cephalic and three extracephalic points. Children with migraine reported other pains, especially stomach pain and limb pain more often than children with episodic tension type or no headache. There were no significant differences in the extracephalic muscular tenderness or in the pressure pain thresholds between the three groups. Children with migraine experience more non-headache pains than children with episodic tension type headache and with no headache. However, neither children with migraine nor children with episodic tension type headache show increased interictal extracephalic muscular sensitivity for palpation.
    European Journal of Pain 11/2006; 10(7):581-5. · 3.22 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
132.20 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2012
    • Päijät-Hämeen Central Hospital
      Lahti, Southern Finland Province, Finland
    • University of Oulu
      • Department of Physiology
      Oulu, Oulu, Finland
  • 2009
    • Satakunta University of Applied Sciences
      Björneborg, Province of Western Finland, Finland
  • 2004–2008
    • Turku University Hospital
      Turku, Province of Western Finland, Finland
  • 2007
    • University of Aberdeen
      Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • 2002–2007
    • University of Turku
      • Department of Public Health
      Turku, Western Finland, Finland
  • 2005–2006
    • University of Tampere
      Tammerfors, Province of Western Finland, Finland
    • Université de Poitiers
      Poitiers, Poitou-Charentes, France
  • 2003–2006
    • Orton Orthopaedic Hospital
      Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland