John Tiller

University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

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Publications (9)15.13 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Although integral to the early detection and treatment of anorexia nervosa, there is a paucity of clear guidance available for general practitioners (GPs). This paper attempts to bridge the gap between the specialist and generalist literature to assist the busy GP feel confident in identifying and managing these patients.
    Australian family physician 08/2014; 43(8):531-6. · 0.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To review the contemporary landscape regarding pharmacological treatments for schizophrenia.
    Australasian Psychiatry 08/2013; 21(4):329-334. · 0.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper aims to present an overview of screening and safety considerations for the treatment of clinical depressive disorders and make recommendations for safety monitoring. Data were sourced by a literature search using MEDLINE and a manual search of scientific journals to identify relevant articles. Draft guidelines were prepared and serially revised in an iterative manner until all co-authors gave final approval of content. Screening and monitoring can detect medical causes of depression. Specific adverse effects associated with antidepressant treatments may be reduced or identified earlier by baseline screening and agent-specific monitoring after commencing treatment. The adoption of safety monitoring guidelines when treating clinical depression is likely to improve overall physical health status and treatment outcome. It is important to implement these guidelines in the routine management of clinical depression.
    Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 09/2011; 45(9):712-25. · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    John W G Tiller, Isaac Schweitzer
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    ABSTRACT: Bipolar disorders are cyclical mood disorders with clinical features including distinct sustained periods of mood elevation. Briefer (4 days or more), mild episodes of mood elevation define bipolar II disorder; lengthier (7 days or more), more severe episodes (or those requiring hospitalisation), with or without psychotic features, define bipolar I disorder. Depressive periods are more common and lengthier than manic or hypomanic states, and are the main cause of disability. Bipolar depression may respond poorly to antidepressants and these medications may destabilise the illness. The diagnosis of bipolar disorder should be considered when a patient with depression is treatment resistant. Irritability is a common symptom in bipolar disorder, particularly during mixed states (during which patients have features of mood elevation and depression concurrently) or when there is rapid cycling of mood (more than four episodes of mood disorder per year). Alcohol misuse and use of illicit drugs may simulate mood changes in bipolar disorder. Accurate diagnosis and assessment of bipolar disorder is essential for clinical decision making and determining prognosis and treatments.
    The Medical journal of Australia 08/2010; 193(4 Suppl):S5-9. · 2.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to review the large US National Institute of Mental Health-sponsored depression intervention effectiveness study, STAR*D, in order to evaluate critically its relevance for Australasian clinicians. CONCLUSIONS: STAR*D is a landmark study which tried to address issues of effectiveness rather than efficacy, of a number of interventions for depression. However, methodological shortcomings limit the utility of the study in informing Australasian clinical practice.
    Australasian Psychiatry 01/2009; 17(5):360-4. · 0.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To review psychiatrists' attitudes and actual practice on the use of typical and atypical antipsychotics in the elderly. Audit data were collected from 18-old-age psychiatry units across Australia. The attitudes of old age psychiatrists and their perceptions of the efficacy, tolerability and clinical usefulness of antipsychotics were examined. The medications used for 321 patients were audited, and the attitudes of the 57 prescribing doctors were assessed. All available atypicals were prescribed and reported as more efficacious and clinically useful than typicals. Adverse events perceived by doctors as an obstacle to prescribing were more frequent than reported adverse event rates in product information. All diagnostic groups improved. Off-label use comprised almost 22% in this sample. Adverse events are impediments to prescribing, more so with typical than atypical antipsychotics. All available atypicals were used and appeared effective in this elderly population.
    Australasian Journal on Ageing 10/2008; 27(3):134-42. · 0.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Up to 45% of patients with debilitating and potentially lethal depressive illness do not achieve remission with initial drug treatment. Using combinations of antidepressants as an early option for treatment-resistant depression has become increasingly common. Before trying combination therapy, it is essential first to ensure diagnosis is correct, and then to optimise antidepressant monotherapy, using an effective dose for an adequate period. Subsequently, augmentation of antidepressants with lithium and triiodothyronine should be considered, as these strategies are strongly supported by numerous clinical trials. Electroconvulsive therapy is the most effective treatment for severe depression. There is little evidence to support use of antidepressant combinations. Risk of toxicity and drug interactions mandate that combinations be used as a last resort, and only in specialist settings.
    The Medical journal of Australia 03/2007; 186(3):142-4. · 2.85 Impact Factor
  • John W G Tiller, Nicholas Ingram
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    ABSTRACT: This study compared electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) seizure threshold determined by stimulus dose titration with age-based estimations. Patients with major depressive disorder had their initial seizure thresholds determined by stimulus dose titration and the results compared with age-based estimations. There are no significant differences in thresholds determined by these methods. Two hundred and three psychiatric patients (149 females, 54 males) had their seizure thresholds determined by stimulus dose titration. There was a significant positive correlation between seizure thresholds and age for males and females with male thresholds greater than female thresholds. Age determinations of seizure threshold would have resulted in excessive initial treatment stimuli for 30% of females and 8% of males. Ineffective stimulus doses would have been given to 2% of females and 7% of males on a full age basis and 64% using a half age strategy. For effective high-dose right unilateral ECT, initial seizure threshold should be determined by stimulus dose titration.
    Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 03/2006; 40(2):188-92. · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Though prevalent in both genders, specific consideration needs to be given when treating a woman suffering from bipolar disorder over her lifetime. Bipolar disorder is a serious and incapacitating illness affecting an estimated 5% of women. The first episode of illness in women is usually a depressive episode. Female gender has been associated with greater axis-one comorbidity, more depressive episodes, rapid cycling and mixed affective states. Special consideration is required for the treatment of bipolar disorder during reproductive events. More studies are required to better understand the course, outcome and gender-specific treatment strategies of this disorder.
    Women s Health 11/2005; 1(3):421-8.