Bryan T Hennessy

Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland

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Publications (131)915.6 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Endometrial cancer incidence is increasing, due in part to a strong association with obesity. Mutations in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, the central relay pathway of insulin signals, occur in the majority of endometrioid adenocarcinomas, the most common form of endometrial cancer. We sought to determine the impact of PI3K pathway alterations on progression free survival in a cohort of endometrioid endometrial cancers. Prognostic utility of PIK3CA, PIK3R1, and PTEN mutations, as well as PTEN protein loss by immunohistochemistry, was explored in the context of patient body mass index. Reverse-phase protein arrays were utilized to assess protein expression based on PTEN status. Among 187 endometrioid endometrial cancers, there were no statistically significant associations between PFS and PIK3CA, PIK3R1, PTEN mutation or loss. When stratified by body mass index, PTEN loss was associated with improved progression free survival (P < 0.006) in obese (body mass index ≥ 30) patients. PTEN loss resulted in distinct protein changes: Canonical PI3K pathway activation was observed only in the non-obese population while decreased expression of β-CATENIN and phosphorylated FOXO3A was observed in obese patients. These data suggest the impact of PTEN loss on tumor biology and clinical outcomes must be interpreted in the context of body mass index, and provide a potential explanation for discrepant reports on the effect of PTEN status and obesity on prognosis in endometrial cancer. This reveals a clinically important interaction between metabolic state and tumor genetics that may unveil the biologic underpinning of obesity-related cancers and impact ongoing clinical trials with PI3K pathway inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Molecular oncology 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.molonc.2015.04.014 · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Because of advances in targeted therapies, the clinical evaluation of cutaneous melanoma is increasingly based on a combination of traditional histopathology and molecular pathology. Therefore, it is necessary to expand our knowledge of the molecular events that accompany the development and progression of melanoma to optimize clinical management. The central objective of this study was to increase our knowledge of the mutational events that complement melanoma progression. High-throughput genotyping was adapted to query 159 known single nucleotide mutations in 33 cancer-related genes across two melanoma cohorts from Ireland (n=94) and Belgium (n=60). Results were correlated with various clinicopathological characteristics. A total of 23 mutations in 12 genes were identified, that is - BRAF, NRAS, MET, PHLPP2, PIK3R1, IDH1, KIT, STK11, CTNNB1, JAK2, ALK, and GNAS. Unexpectedly, we discovered significant differences in BRAF, MET, and PIK3R1 mutations between the cohorts. That is, cases from Ireland showed significantly lower (P<0.001) BRAF mutation rates (19%) compared with the mutation frequency observed in Belgian patients (43%). Moreover, MET mutations were detected in 12% of Irish cases, whereas none of the Belgian patients harbored these mutations, and Irish patients significantly more often (P=0.027) had PIK3R1-mutant (33%) melanoma versus 17% of Belgian cases. The low incidence of BRAF-mutant melanoma among Irish patients was confirmed in five independent Irish cohorts, and in total, only 165 of 689 (24%) Irish cases carried mutant BRAF. Together, our data show that melanoma-driving mutations vary by demographic area, which has important implications for the clinical management of this disease.
    Melanoma Research 03/2015; 25(3). DOI:10.1097/CMR.0000000000000149 · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours (IMTs) are rare sarcomas that were first described in the lung. They are composed of myofibroblastic mesenchymal spindle cells accompanied by an inflammatory infiltrate of plasma cells. Complete resection is the treatment of choice. There is currently no standard treatment for inoperable or recurrent disease. Expression of ALK protein triggered by ALK gene rearrangement at chromosome 2p23 has been found in 36%-60% of IMTs. We report a rapid early response to crizotinib as neoadjuvant therapy, enabling surgical excision of a large ALK-translocated IMT, which resulted in complete disease clearance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature of a patient with IMT in whom crizotinib was used successfully in the neoadjuvant or curative setting.
    Tumori 03/2015; DOI:10.5301/tj.5000245 · 1.09 Impact Factor
  • N Elster · D M Collins · S Toomey · J Crown · A J Eustace · B T Hennessy
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    ABSTRACT: Approximately 20 % of human breast cancers (BC) overexpress HER2 protein, and HER2-positivity is associated with a worse prognosis. Although HER2-targeted therapies have significantly improved outcomes for HER2-positive BC patients, resistance to trastuzumab-based therapy remains a clinical problem. In order to better understand resistance to HER2-targeted therapies in HER2-positive BC, it is necessary to examine HER family signalling as a whole. An extensive literature search was carried out to critically assess the current knowledge of HER family signalling in HER2-positive BC and response to HER2-targeted therapy. Known mechanisms of trastuzumab resistance include reduced receptor-antibody binding (MUC4, p95HER2), increased signalling through alternative HER family receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), altered intracellular signalling involving loss of PTEN, reduced p27kip1, or increased PI3K/AKT activity and altered signalling via non-HER family RTKs such as IGF1R. Emerging strategies to circumvent resistance to HER2-targeted therapies in HER2-positive BC include co-targeting HER2/PI3K, pan-HER family inhibition, and novel therapies such as T-DM1. There is evidence that immunity plays a key role in the efficacy of HER-targeted therapy, and efforts are being made to exploit the immune system in order to improve the efficacy of current anti-HER therapies. With our rapidly expanding understanding of HER2 signalling mechanisms along with the repertoire of HER family and other targeted therapies, it is likely that the near future holds further dramatic improvements to the prognosis of women with HER2-positive BC.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 12/2014; 149(1). DOI:10.1007/s10549-014-3250-x · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The PI3K pathway is a key mechanism of trastuzumab resistance, but early attempts to indirectly target this pathway with mTOR inhibitors have had limited success. We present the results of a preclinical study of the selective alpha/delta isoform dominant PI3K inhibitor BAY 80-6946 tested alone and in combination with HER2-targeted therapies in HER2-positive cell lines, including models with acquired resistance to trastuzumab and/or lapatinib. A panel of HER2-positive breast cancer cells were profiled for their mutational status using Sequenom MassARRAY, PTEN status by Western blot, and anti-proliferative response to BAY 80-6946 alone and in combination with the HER2-targeted therapies trastuzumab, lapatinib and afatinib. Reverse phase protein array was used to determine the effect of BAY 80-6946 on expression and phosphorylation of 68 proteins including members of the PI3K and MAPK pathways. The Boyden chamber method was used to determine if BAY 80-6946 affected cellular invasion and migration. BAY 80-6946 has anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects when used alone in our panel of cell lines (IC50s 3.9–29.4 nM). BAY 80-6946 inhibited PI3K signalling and was effective in cells regardless of their PI3K, P53 or PTEN status. The combination of HER2-targeted therapies and BAY 80-6946 inhibited growth more effectively than either therapy used alone (with clear synergism in many cases), and can restore sensitivity to trastuzumab and lapatinib in cells with acquired resistance to either trastuzumab and/or lapatinib. The addition of BAY 80-6946 to HER2-targeted therapy could represent an improved treatment strategy for patients with refractory metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer, and should be considered for clinical trial evaluation.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 12/2014; 149(2). DOI:10.1007/s10549-014-3239-5 · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In locally advanced rectal cancer, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is performed prior to surgery to downstage the tumour. Thirty to 40 % of patients do not respond. Defects in apoptotic machinery lead to therapy resistance; however, to date, no study quantitatively assessed whether B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2)-dependent regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis, effector caspase activation downstream of mitochondria or a combination of both predicts patient responses. In a cohort of 20 rectal cancer patients, we performed protein profiling of tumour tissue and employed validated ordinary differential equation-based systems models of apoptosis signalling to calculate the ability of cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. Model outputs were compared to clinical responses. Systems modelling of BCL2-signalling predicted patients in the poor response group (p = 0.0049). Systems modelling also demonstrated that rectal cancers depended on BCL2 rather than B cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL(X)L) or myeloid cell leukemia 1 (MCL1) for survival, suggesting that poor responders may benefit from therapy with selective BCL2 antagonists. Dynamic modelling of effector caspase activation could not stratify patients with poor response and did not further improve predictive power. We deliver a powerful patient stratification tool identifying patients who will likely not benefit from neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and should be prioritised for surgical resection or treatment with BCL2 antagonists.
    Journal of Molecular Medicine 11/2014; 93(3). DOI:10.1007/s00109-014-1221-7 · 4.74 Impact Factor
  • International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 11/2014; 90(5):S49-S50. DOI:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2014.08.243 · 4.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ovarian cancer has the lowest survival rate of all gynaecologic cancers and is characterised by a lack of early symptoms and frequent late stage diagnosis. There is a paucity of robust molecular markers that are independent of and complementary to clinical parameters such as disease stage and tumour grade. We have developed a user-friendly, web-based system to evaluate the association of genes/miRNAs with outcome in ovarian cancer. The OvMark algorithm combines data from multiple microarray platforms (including probesets targeting miRNAs) and correlates them with clinical parameters (e.g. tumour grade, stage) and outcomes (disease free survival (DFS), overall survival). In total, OvMark combines 14 datasets from 7 different array platforms measuring the expression of ~17,000 genes and 341 miRNAs across 2,129 ovarian cancer samples. To demonstrate the utility of the system we confirmed the prognostic ability of 14 genes and 2 miRNAs known to play a role in ovarian cancer. Of these genes, CXCL12 was the most significant predictor of DFS (HR = 1.42, p-value = 2.42x10−6). Surprisingly, those genes found to have the greatest correlation with outcome have not been heavily studied in ovarian cancer, or in some cases in any cancer. For instance, the three genes with the greatest association with survival are SNAI3, VWA3A and DNAH12. OvMark is a powerful tool for examining putative gene/miRNA prognostic biomarkers in ovarian cancer (available at http://glados.ucd.ie/OvMark/index.html). The impact of this tool will be in the preliminary assessment of putative biomarkers in ovarian cancer, particularly for research groups with limited bioinformatics facilities.
    Molecular Cancer 10/2014; 13(1):241. DOI:10.1186/1476-4598-13-241 · 5.40 Impact Factor
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    Yasir Y Elamin · Shereen Rafee · Sinead Toomey · Bryan T Hennessy
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    ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis or new vessel formation is essential for tumour growth and progression. Therefore, targeting angiogenesis has been an attractive strategy in the treatment ofcancer. Bevacizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal IgG1 antibody thattargets vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) - a key molecular player inangiogenesis. Bevacizumumab has shown clinical efficacy in phase III clinical trials inseveral advanced solid malignancies. The clinical efficacy of bevacizumumab isprimarily due to its antiangiogenic effects; however, there are direct antitumor effectsand immunomodulatory effects. Enhancing the immune system to restore itsantitumour activity has been utilized successfully in clinical setting. In this article we willdiscuss the possible immunomodulatory effects of the most clinically usedantiangiogenic agent; bevacizumumab.
    Cancer Microenvironment 10/2014; 8(1). DOI:10.1007/s12307-014-0160-8
  • Journal of Geriatric Oncology 10/2014; 5:S53. DOI:10.1016/j.jgo.2014.09.090 · 1.15 Impact Factor
  • 39th ESMO Congress (ESMO); 09/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Peroxiredoxin-1 (PRDX1) is a multifunctional protein, acting as a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenger, molecular chaperone and immune modulator. Although differential PRDX1 expression has been described in many tumors, the potential role of PRDX1 in breast cancer remains highly ambiguous. Using a comprehensive antibody-based proteomics approach, we interrogated PRDX1 protein as a putative biomarker in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Methods An anti-PRDX1 antibody was validated in breast cancer cell lines using immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and reverse phase protein array (RPPA) technology. PRDX1 protein expression was evaluated in two independent breast cancer cohorts, represented on a screening RPPA (n = 712) and a validation tissue microarray (n = 498). In vitro assays were performed exploring the functional contribution of PRDX1, with oxidative stress conditions mimicked via treatment with H2O2, peroxynitrite, or adenanthin, a PRDX1/2 inhibitor. Results In ER-positive cases, high PRDX1 protein expression is a biomarker of improved prognosis across both cohorts. In the validation cohort, high PRDX1 expression was an independent predictor of improved relapse-free survival (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.40 to 0.96, P = 0.032), breast cancer-specific survival (HR = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.24 to 0.79, P = 0.006) and overall survival (HR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.44 to 0.85, P = 0.004). RPPA screening of cancer signaling proteins showed that ERα protein was upregulated in PRDX1 high tumors. Exogenous H2O2 treatment decreased ERα protein levels in ER-positive cells. PRDX1 knockdown further sensitized cells to H2O2- and peroxynitrite-mediated effects, whilst PRDX1 overexpression protected against this response. Inhibition of PRDX1/2 antioxidant activity with adenanthin dramatically reduced ERα levels in breast cancer cells. Conclusions PRDX1 is shown to be an independent predictor of improved outcomes in ER-positive breast cancer. Through its antioxidant function, PRDX1 may prevent oxidative stress-mediated ERα loss, thereby potentially contributing to maintenance of an ER-positive phenotype in mammary tumors. These results for the first time imply a close connection between biological activity of PRDX1 and regulation of estrogen-mediated signaling in breast cancer.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 07/2014; 16(4):R79. DOI:10.1186/bcr3691 · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer is poor in part due to the high frequency of chemoresistance. Recent evidence points to the Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), and particularly its adaptor protein MyD88, as one potential mediator of this resistance. This study aims to provide further evidence that MyD88 positive cancer cells are clinically significant, stem-like and reproducibly detectable for the purposes of prognostic stratification. Expression of TLR4 and MyD88 was assessed immunohistochemically in 198 paraffin-embedded ovarian tissues and in an embryonal carcinoma model of cancer stemness. In parallel, expression of TLR4 and MyD88 mRNA and regulatory microRNAs (miR-21 and miR-146a) was assessed, as well as in a series of chemosensitive and resistant cancer cells lines. Functional analysis of the pathway was assessed in chemoresistant SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells. TLR4 and MyD88 expression can be reproducibly assessed via immunohistochemistry using a semi-quantitative scoring system. TLR4 expression was present in all ovarian epithelium (normal and neoplastic), whereas MyD88 was restricted to neoplastic cells, independent of tumour grade and associated with reduced progression-free and overall survival, in an immunohistological specific subset of serous carcinomas, p<0.05. MiR-21 and miR-146a expression was significantly increased in MyD88 negative cancers (p<0.05), indicating their participation in regulation. Significant alterations in MyD88 mRNA expression were observed between chemosensitive and chemoresistant cells and tissue. Knockdown of TLR4 in SKOV-3 ovarian cells recovered chemosensitivity. Knockdown of MyD88 alone did not. MyD88 expression was down-regulated in differentiated embryonal carcinoma (NTera2) cells, supporting the MyD88+ cancer stem cell hypothesis. Our findings demonstrate that expression of MyD88 is associated with significantly reduced patient survival and altered microRNA levels and suggest an intact/functioning TLR4/MyD88 pathway is required for acquisition of the chemoresistant phenotype. Ex vivo manipulation of ovarian cancer stem cell (CSC) differentiation can decrease MyD88 expression, providing a potentially valuable CSC model for ovarian cancer.
    PLoS ONE 06/2014; 9(6):e100816. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0100816 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cytotoxicity of PARP inhibitors olaparib, veliparib, and CEP-8983 were investigated in two P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpressing drug-resistant cell models (IGROVCDDP and KB-8-5-11). IGROVCDDP and KB-8-5-11 were both resistant to olaparib and resistance was reversible with the P-gp inhibitors elacridar, zosuquidar, and valspodar. In contrast, the P-gp overexpressing models were not resistant to veliparib or CEP-8983. Olaparib and veliparib did not induce protein expression of P-gp in IGROVCDDP or KB-8-5-11 at doses that successfully inhibit PARP. Olaparib therefore appears to be a P-gp substrate. Veliparib and CEP-8983 do not appear to be substrates. Veliparib and CEP-8983 may therefore be more useful in combined chemotherapy regimens with P-gp substrates and may be active in platinum and taxane-resistant ovarian cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 06/2014; 103(6). DOI:10.1002/jps.23952 · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC: T3/4 and/or node-positive) is treated with preoperative/neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), but responses are not uniform. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), MAP kinase (MAPK), and related pathways are implicated in rectal cancer tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the association between genetic mutations in these pathways and LARC clinical outcomes. We genotyped 234 potentially clinically relevant nonsynonymous mutations in 33 PI3K and MAPK pathway-related genes, including PIK3CA, PIK3R1, AKT, STK11, KRAS, BRAF, MEK, CTNNB1, EGFR, MET, and NRAS, using the Sequenom platform. DNA samples were extracted from pretreatment LARC biopsy samples taken from 201 patients who were then treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT followed by surgical resection. Sixty-two mutations were detected in 15 genes, with the highest frequencies occurring in KRAS (47 %), PIK3CA (14 %), STK11 (6.5 %), and CTNNB1 (6 %). Mutations were detected in BRAF, NRAS, AKT1, PIK3R1, EGFR, GNAS, MEK1, PDGFRA, ALK, and TNK2, but at frequencies of <5 %. As expected, a pathologic complete response (pCR) was associated with improved 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS; hazard ratio, 0.074; 95 % CI 0.01-0.54; p = 0.001). Mutations in PI3K pathway-related genes (odds ratio, 5.146; 95 % CI 1.17-22.58; p = 0.030), but not MAPK pathway-related genes (p = 0.911), were associated with absence of pCR after neoadjuvant CRT. In contrast, in patients who did not achieve pCR, mutations in PI3K pathway-related genes were not associated with recurrence-free survival (p = 0.987). However, in these patients, codon 12 (G12D/G12 V/G12S) and 13 mutations in KRAS were associated with poor recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 1.579; 95 % confidence ratio, 1.00-2.48; p = 0.048). Mutations in kinase signaling pathways modulate treatment responsiveness and clinical outcomes in LARC and may constitute rational targets for novel therapies.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 04/2014; 21(8). DOI:10.1245/s10434-014-3658-x · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) analysis is a powerful, rel- atively new platform that allows for high-throughput, quantitative analysis of protein networks. One of the challenges that currently limit the potential of this technology is the lack of methods that al- low for accurate data modeling and identification of related networks and samples. Such models may improve the accuracy of biological sample classification based on patterns of protein network activation and provide insight into the distinct biological relationships underly- ing different types of cancer. Motivated by RPPA data, we propose a Bayesian sparse graphical modeling approach that uses selection priors on the conditional relationships in the presence of class infor- mation. The novelty of our Bayesian model lies in the ability to draw information from the network data as well as from the associated categorical outcome in a unified hierarchical model for classification. In addition, our method allows for intuitive integration of a priori network information directly in the model and allows for posterior inference on the network topologies both within and between classes. Applying our methodology to an RPPA data set generated from pan- els of human breast cancer and ovarian cancer cell lines, we demon- strate that the model is able to distinguish the different cancer cell types more accurately than several existing models and to identify differential regulation of components of a critical signaling network (the PI3K-AKT pathway) between these two types of cancer. This approach represents a powerful new tool that can be used to improve our understanding of protein networks in cancer.
    The Annals of Applied Statistics 03/2014; 8(3). DOI:10.1214/14-AOAS722 · 1.69 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Research 03/2014; 73(24 Supplement):P4-12-25-P4-12-25. DOI:10.1158/0008-5472.SABCS13-P4-12-25 · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ovarian cancer is now recognized as a number of distinct diseases primarily defined by histological subtype. Both clear cell ovarian carcinomas (CCC) and ovarian endometrioid carcinomas (EC) may arise from endometriosis and frequently harbor mutations in the ARID1A tumor suppressor gene. We studied the influence of histological subtype on protein expression with reverse phase protein array (RPPA) and assessed proteomic changes associated with ARID1A mutation/BAF250a expression in EC and CCC. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for BAF250a expression was performed on 127 chemotherapy-naive ovarian carcinomas (33 CCC, 29 EC, and 65 high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSC)). Whole tumor lysates were prepared from frozen banked tumor samples and profiled by RPPA using 116 antibodies. ARID1A mutations were identified by exome sequencing, and PIK3CA mutations were characterized by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. SAM (Significance Analysis of Microarrays) was performed to determine differential protein expression by histological subtype and ARID1A mutation status. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the impact of ARID1A mutation status/BAF250a expression on AKT phosphorylation (pAKT). PIK3CA mutation type and PTEN expression were included in the model. BAF250a knockdown was performed in 3 clear cell lines using siRNA to ARID1A. Marked differences in protein expression were observed that are driven by histotype. Compared to HGSC, SAM identified over 50 proteins that are differentially expressed in CCC and EC. These included PI3K/AKT pathway proteins, those regulating the cell cycle, apoptosis, transcription, and other signaling pathways including steroid hormone signaling. Multivariate models showed that tumors with loss of BAF250a expression showed significantly higher levels of AKT-Thr308 and AKT-Ser 473 phosphorylation (p < 0.05). In 31 CCC cases, pAKT was similarly significantly increased in tumors with BAF250a loss on IHC. Knockdown of BAF250a by siRNA in three CCC cell lines wild type for ARID1A showed no increase in either pAKT-Thr308 or pAKT-S473 suggesting that pAKT in tumor tissues is indirectly regulated by BAF250a expression. Proteomic assessment of CCC and EC demonstrates remarkable differences in protein expression that are dependent on histotype, thereby further characterizing these cancers. AKT phosphorylation is associated with ARID1A/BAF250a deficient tumors, however in ovarian cancers the mechanism remains to be elucidated.
    BMC Cancer 02/2014; 14(1):120. DOI:10.1186/1471-2407-14-120 · 3.32 Impact Factor
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    Lung Cancer 01/2014; 83:S4. DOI:10.1016/S0169-5002(14)70010-8 · 3.74 Impact Factor
  • Lung Cancer 01/2014; 83:S2. DOI:10.1016/S0169-5002(14)70004-2 · 3.74 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

6k Citations
915.60 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2015
    • Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
  • 2010–2014
    • Beaumont Hospital
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
  • 2004–2014
    • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
      • • Department of Systems Biology
      • • Department of Molecular Therapeutics
      • • Department of Leukemia
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 2013
    • Dublin City University
      • National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology (NICB)
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
    • Trinity College Dublin
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
  • 2012
    • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2009
    • Rice University
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 2006–2009
    • University of Houston
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 2001–2004
    • St. James's Hospital
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
  • 2003
    • Cork University Hospital
      Corcaigh, Munster, Ireland