Huiping Jiang

CUNY Graduate Center, New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (15)53.26 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We examined the association between the therapeutic alliance and treatment outcomes among 223 women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders who participated in a multisite clinical trial of group treatments for trauma and addictions in the United States throughout 2004 and 2005. General linear models indicated that women who received Seeking Safety, a cognitive-behavioral treatment, had significantly higher alliance ratings than those in Women's Health Education, a control group. Alliance was related to significant decreases in PTSD symptoms and higher attendance in both interventions. Alliance was not related to substance use outcomes. Implications and limitations of the findings are discussed.
    Substance Use &amp Misuse 04/2012; 47(6):695-707. · 1.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Predictors of smoking cessation (SC) treatment outcome were explored in a multisite clinical trial of SC treatment at community-based, outpatient, substance abuse rehabilitation programs affiliated with the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. To explore baseline demographic and clinical predictors of abstinence during treatment. Cigarette smokers from five methadone maintenance programs and two drug and alcohol dependence treatment programs were randomly assigned to SC treatment as an adjunct to substance abuse treatment as usual or to substance abuse treatment as usual. SC treatment consisted of group counseling (weeks 1-8) plus transdermal nicotine patch treatment (21 mg/day, weeks 1-6; 14 mg/day, weeks 7-8). Demographic and clinical predictors of smoking abstinence were evaluated among those patients assigned to the active SC condition (N = 153) using logistic regression. Abstinence during treatment was positively associated with younger age, Hispanic or Caucasian (as opposed to African American) ethnicity/race, employment or student status, fewer cigarettes per day at baseline, lower severity of the primary substance problem at baseline, and higher methadone doses (among the subsample in methadone treatment). During future efforts to improve SC treatments among drug- and alcohol-dependent patients, consideration should be given to adequate treatment to reduce the severity of the primary drug or alcohol problem, tailoring treatments for patients with greater severity of smoking and of the primary substance problem, and culturally sensitive interventions. Analysis of predictors of outcome may be a useful tool for treatment development.
    The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 09/2011; 37(5):472-8. · 1.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A strong association between substance use disorders (SUDs) and eating disorders (EDs) in women has been established. Yet, little is known about the rates and impact of ED symptoms in women presenting to addiction treatment. The current investigation assessed the prevalence of ED symptoms and their effect on treatment outcomes in a sample of substance abusing women with co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) enrolled in outpatient substance use programs. Participants were 122 women who participated in a multisite clinical trial comparing two behavioral treatments for co-occurring SUD and PTSD. The Eating Disorder Examination-self report, and measures of PTSD and SUD symptoms were administered at baseline, during treatment and at four follow-up points. Two subgroups emerged; those reporting binge eating in the 28 days prior to baseline (Binge group; n = 35) and those who reported no binge eating episodes (No Binge group; n = 87). Women in the Binge group endorsed significantly higher ED, PTSD, and depression symptoms at baseline than those in the No Binge group. Although all participants showed significant reductions in PTSD symptoms and improvements in abstinence rates during the study period, the improvements for the Binge group were significantly lower. These findings suggest that a subgroup of women with co-occurring PTSD and SUDs, who endorsed binge ED symptoms, responded differently to SUD/PTSD group treatment. Identification of ED symptoms among treatment-seeking women with SUDs may be an important element in tailoring interventions and enhancing treatment outcomes.
    American Journal on Addictions 04/2010; 19(3):245-51. · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) recently completed a randomized, open label trial comparing treatment as usual (TAU) combined with nicotine patches plus cognitive behavioral group counseling for smoking cessation (n = 153) to TAU alone (n = 72) for patients enrolled in treatment programs for drug or alcohol dependence, who were interested in quitting smoking. This report is a secondary analysis evaluating the effect of depressive symptomatology (n = 70) or history of depression (n = 110) on smoking cessation outcomes. A significant association was seen between measures of depression and difficulty quitting cigarettes. Specifically, there was a greater probability for smoking abstinence for those with lower baseline Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) scores. These data suggest that evaluation and treatment of depressive symptoms may play an important role in improving smoking cessation outcomes. (Am J Addict 2010;00:1-8).
    American Journal on Addictions 03/2010; 19(2):111-8. · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the analysis was to examine the temporal course of improvement in symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder among women in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Participants were 353 women randomly assigned to 12 sessions of either trauma-focused or health education group treatment. PTSD and substance use assessments were conducted during treatment and posttreatment at 1 week and after 3, 6, and 12 months. A continuous Markov model was fit on four defined response categories (nonresponse, substance use response, PTSD response, or global response [improvement in both PTSD and substance use]) to investigate the temporal association between improvement in PTSD and substance use symptom severity during the study's treatment phase. A generalized linear model was applied to test this relationship over the follow-up period. Subjects exhibiting nonresponse, substance use response, or global response tended to maintain original classification; subjects exhibiting PTSD response were significantly more likely to transition to global response over time, indicating maintained PTSD improvement was associated with subsequent substance use improvement. Trauma-focused treatment was significantly more effective than health education in achieving substance use improvement, but only among those who were heavy substance users at baseline and had achieved significant PTSD reductions. PTSD severity reductions were more likely to be associated with substance use improvement, with minimal evidence of substance use symptom reduction improving PTSD symptoms. Results support the self-medication model of coping with PTSD symptoms and an empirical basis for integrated interventions for improved substance use outcomes in patients with severe symptoms.
    American Journal of Psychiatry 11/2009; 167(1):95-101. · 14.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rates of relapse among cocaine-dependent patients are high, and new treatment approaches are needed. Clinical data demonstrate that a cocaine vaccine (TA-CD) produces selective anticocaine antibodies, yet the impact of these antibodies on cocaine's direct effects is unknown. The objective of this human laboratory study was to measure the relationship between antibody titers and the effects of smoked cocaine on ratings of intoxication, craving, and cardiovascular effects. Ten cocaine-dependent men not seeking drug treatment spent 2 nights per week for 13 weeks inpatient where the effects of cocaine (0 mg, 25 mg, 50 mg) were determined before vaccination and at weekly intervals thereafter. Two doses of TA-CD (82 microg, n = 4; 360 microg, n = 6) were administered at weeks 1, 3, 5, and 9. Peak plasma antibody levels, which were highly variable, significantly predicted cocaine's effects. Those individuals in the upper half of antibody production had an immediate (within 4 minutes of cocaine smoking) and robust (55%-81%) reduction in ratings of good drug effect and cocaine quality, while those in the lower half showed only a nonsignificant attenuation (6%-26%). Self-reported cocaine use while participants were outpatient tended to decrease as a function of antibody titer (p < .12). By contrast, higher antibody levels predicted significantly greater cocaine-induced tachycardia. The TA-CD vaccine substantially decreased smoked cocaine's intoxicating effects in those generating sufficient antibody. These data support further testing of cocaine immunotherapy as a treatment for cocaine dependence.
    Biological psychiatry 10/2009; 67(1):59-65. · 8.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The authors compared the effectiveness of the Seeking Safety group, cognitive-behavioral treatment for substance use disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), to an active comparison health education group (Women's Health Education [WHE]) within the National Institute on Drug Abuse's Clinical Trials Network. The authors randomized 353 women to receive 12 sessions of Seeking Safety (M = 6.2 sessions) or WHE (M = 6.0 sessions) with follow-up assessment 1 week and 3, 6, and 12 months posttreatment. Primary outcomes were the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), the PTSD Symptom Scale-Self Report (PSS-SR), and a substance use inventory (self-reported abstinence and percentage of days of use over 7 days). Intention-to-treat analysis showed large, clinically significant reductions in CAPS and PSS-SR symptoms (d = 1.94 and 1.12, respectively) but no reliable difference between conditions. Substance use outcomes were not significantly different over time between the two treatments and at follow-up showed no significant change from baseline. Study results do not favor Seeking Safety over WHE as an adjunct to substance use disorder treatment for women with PTSD and reflect considerable opportunity to improve clinical outcomes in community-based treatments for these co-occurring conditions.
    Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 09/2009; 77(4):607-19. · 4.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Naltrexone is a theoretically promising alternative to agonist substitution treatment for opioid dependence, but its effectiveness has been severely limited by poor adherence. This study examined, in an independent sample, a previously observed association between moderate cannabis use and improved retention in naltrexone treatment. Opioid dependent patients (N = 63), admitted for inpatient detoxification and induction onto oral naltrexone, and randomized into a six-month trial of intensive behavioral therapy (Behavioral Naltrexone Therapy) versus a control behavioral therapy (Compliance Enhancement), were classified into three levels of cannabis use during treatment based on biweekly urine toxicology: abstinent (0% cannabis positive urine samples); intermittent use (1% to 79% cannabis positive samples); and consistent use (80% or greater cannabis positive samples). Intermittent cannabis users showed superior retention in naltrexone treatment (median days retained = 133; mean = 112.8, SE = 17.5), compared to abstinent (median = 35; mean = 47.3, SE = 9.2) or consistent users (median = 35; mean = 68.3, SE = 14.1) (log rank = 12.2, df = 2, p = .002). The effect remained significant in a Cox model after adjustment for baseline level of heroin use and during treatment level of cocaine use. Intermittent cannabis use was also associated with greater adherence to naltrexone pill-taking. Treatment interacted with cannabis use level, such that intensive behavioral therapy appeared to moderate the adverse prognosis in the consistent cannabis use group. The association between moderate cannabis use and improved retention on naltrexone treatment was replicated. Experimental studies are needed to directly test the hypothesis that cannabinoid agonists exert a beneficial pharmacological effect on naltrexone maintenance and to understand the mechanism.
    American Journal on Addictions 07/2009; 18(4):301-8. · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Women in drug treatment struggle with co-occurring problems, including trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which can heighten HIV risk. This study examines the impact of two group therapy interventions on reduction of unprotected sexual occasions (USO) among women with substance use disorders (SUD) and PTSD. Participants were 346 women recruited from and receiving treatment at six community-based drug treatment programs participating in NIDA's Clinical Trials Network. Participants were randomized to receive 12-sessions of either seeking safety (SS), a cognitive behavioral intervention for women with PTSD and SUD, or women's health education (WHE), an attention control psychoeducational group. Participants receiving SS who were at higher sexual risk (i.e., at least 12 USO per month) significantly reduced the number of USO over 12-month follow up compared to WHE. High risk women with co-occurring PTSD and addiction may benefit from treatment addressing coping skills and trauma to reduce HIV risk.
    AIDS and Behavior 06/2009; 14(2):421-30. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the process of change by modeling transitions among four clinical states encountered in 64 detoxified opiate-dependent individuals treated with daily oral naltrexone: no opiate use, blocked opiate use (i.e., opiate use while adhering to oral naltrexone), unblocked opiate use (i.e., opiate use after having discontinued oral naltrexone), and treatment dropout. The effects of baseline characteristics and two psychosocial interventions of differing intensity, behavioral naltrexone therapy (BNT) and compliance enhancement (CE), on these transitions were studied. Participants using greater quantities of opiates were more likely than other participants to be retained in BNT relative to CE. Markov modeling indicated a transition from abstinence to treatment dropout was approximately 3.56 times greater among participants in CE relative to participants in BNT, indicating the more comprehensive psychosocial intervention kept participants engaged in treatment longer. Transitions to stopping treatment were more likely to occur after unblocked opiate use in both treatments. Continued opiate use while being blocked accounted for a relatively low proportion of transitions to abstinence and may have more deleterious effects later in a treatment episode. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).
    Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 04/2009; 23(1):47-55. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Substance Abusers have a large number of medical and psychiatric problems, and 70-90% are smokers. The aim of this analysis was to examine the prevalence and correlates of medical and psychiatric problems in this sample of drug dependent patients who were participants in a multi-site study of smoking cessation interventions while engaged in substance abuse treatment. Descriptive analyses showed at baseline, 72.8% of participants had at least one medical problem and 64.1% had at least one psychiatric diagnosis. Medical problems correlated strongly with age, smoking severity, and pack-years; Psychiatric problems correlated with gender and ethnicity. Smoking cessation treatment was associated with a moderate reduction in the ASI Medical composite score. More research is needed on the possible effects of combined treatment of substance abuse and concurrent medical and psychiatric problems. Offering smoking cessation in conjunction with primary care may be a way to address the health needs of this population.
    Journal of drug issues 03/2009; 39(2):293-312. · 0.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nicotine dependence is highly prevalent among drug- and alcohol-dependent patients. A multisite clinical trial of smoking cessation (SC) treatment was performed at outpatient community-based substance abuse rehabilitation programs affiliated with the National Drug Abuse Treatment, Clinical Trials Network. Cigarette smokers (N=225) from five methadone maintenance programs and two drug and alcohol dependence treatment programs were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either (1) SC treatment as an adjunct to substance abuse treatment-as-usual (TAU) or (2) substance abuse TAU. Smoking cessation treatment consisted of 1 week of group counseling before the target quit date and 8 weeks of group counseling plus transdermal nicotine patch treatment (21 mg/day for Weeks 1-6 and 14 mg/day for Weeks 7 and 8) after the target quit date. Smoking abstinence rates in SC, 10%-11% during treatment and 5%-6% at the 13- and 26-week follow-up visits, were significantly better than those in TAU during treatment (p< .01). In addition, SC was associated with significantly greater reductions as compared with TAU in cigarettes smoked per day (75% reduction, p< .001), exhaled carbon monoxide levels (p< .001), cigarette craving (p< .05), and nicotine withdrawal (p< .05). Smoking cessation did not differ from TAU on rates of retention in substance abuse treatment, abstinence from primary substance of abuse, and craving for primary substance of abuse. Compliance with SC treatment, moderate at best, was positively associated with smoking abstinence rates. Smoking cessation treatment resulted in significant reductions in daily smoking and modest smoking abstinence rates without having an adverse impact on substance abuse rehabilitation when given concurrently with outpatient substance abuse treatment. Substance abuse treatment programs should not hesitate to implement SC for established patients.
    Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 07/2008; 35(1):68-77. · 3.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A substantial number of women who enter substance abuse treatment have a history of trauma and meet criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Fear regarding the extent to which PTSD treatment can evoke negative consequences remains a research question. This study explored adverse events related to the implementation of an integrated treatment for women with trauma and substance use disorder (Seeking Safety) compared with a nontrauma-focused intervention (Women's Health Education). Three hundred fifty-three women enrolled in community substance abuse treatment were randomized to 1 of the 2 study groups and monitored weekly for adverse events. There were no differences between the two intervention groups in the number of women reporting study-related adverse events (28 [9.6%] for the Seeking Safety group and 21[7.2%] for the Women's Health Education group). Implementing PTSD treatment in substance abuse treatment programs appears to be safe, with minimal impact on intervention-related adverse psychiatric and substance abuse symptoms. More research is needed on the efficacy of such interventions to improve outcomes of PTSD and substance use.
    Journal of substance abuse treatment 03/2008; 35(3):304-11. · 2.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Opioid dependence is a growing public health problem. Maintenance on the antagonist naltrexone for clinic- or office-based treatment of opioid dependence is plagued by high rates of relapse. This paper identifies critical determinants of lapses to opioid use during naltrexone maintenance. Time retained in treatment was examined as a function of whether lapses to opioid use occurred while adherent to naltrexone (blocked use), or after having missed naltrexone doses (unblocked). Participants (N=83) met DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence and identified a significant other willing to participate in their treatment. Following inpatient detoxification, participants were enrolled in a 26-week outpatient course of therapy and naltrexone maintenance. Patients with unblocked use had a very high rate of dropout (10% retained at 6 months), dropout usually occurring within 2 weeks after unblocked use. Patients with only blocked use had less dropout (33% retained at 6 months). However, episodes of blocked use were often followed by unblocked use and dropout. During naltrexone maintenance for opioid dependence unblocked opioid use calls for immediate intervention, such as detoxification or switching to the partial agonist buprenorphine. Episodes of blocked use warrant increased clinical attention, such as direct observation of naltrexone ingestion, increased dose, or increased intensity of treatment contact. Maintenance on oral naltrexone is a fragile treatment because it is so easily undermined by episodes of opioid use while non-compliant. New long-acting injectable or implantable formulations of naltrexone may address this limitation and should be investigated for treatment of opioid dependence.
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence 01/2008; 91(2-3):289-92. · 3.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cigarette smoking is widely prevalent among individuals in treatment for drug or alcohol dependence; however, the treatment of nicotine addiction in this population has numerous obstacles at both programmatic and patient levels. Despite these difficulties, recent studies have demonstrated moderate success in implementing smoking cessation treatment in drug rehabilitation programs. The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network sponsored a smoking cessation study in 13 community-based outpatient substance abuse rehabilitation programs across the country. The study evaluated the effectiveness of smoking cessation treatment provided as an adjunct to substance abuse treatment-as-usual. This report summarizes the practical and clinical experiences encountered at each of the study sites with regard to implementing the smoking cessation treatment intervention. Smoking behavior of the treatment clientele was assessed by anonymous survey at each site. In addition, sites were systematically characterized by using program review and assessment tools completed by the respective staff and program directors at the site. Survey and recruitment data indicated that cigarette smoking is more prevalent and that smoking cessation treatment is more feasible, in methadone maintenance treatment programs. Other factors associated with smoking behavior and with the recruitment of drug- and alcohol-dependent individuals into the smoking cessation treatment study are described.
    Journal of Addiction Medicine 09/2007; 1(3):154-160. · 1.73 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

248 Citations
115 Downloads
1k Views
53.26 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2012
    • CUNY Graduate Center
      New York City, New York, United States
    • City College of New York
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2008–2012
    • New York State Psychiatric Institute
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2008–2009
    • Columbia University
      • • Department of Psychiatry
      • • College of Physicians and Surgeons
      New York City, NY, United States