Peter Jacoby

Telethon Kids Institute, Western Australia, Australia

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Publications (125)397.88 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Numerous studies have observed that a proportion of infants later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience accelerated head growth during the first years of life. An emerging methodology for examining the developmental trajectory prior to a diagnosis of ASD is to investigate siblings of affected individuals. The current study is the first prospective investigation of fetal growth in siblings of children with ASD. Two groups of pregnant women were recruited as part of the PRegnancy Investigation of Siblings and Mothers of children with autism cohort in Perth, Western Australia. The "high risk" group (n = 23) comprised pregnant women who have an existing child with a diagnosis of ASD and the "low risk" group (n = 36) comprised pregnant mothers who have an existing child who has developed typically. Prenatal ultrasounds were procured at multiple time-points throughout the second- and third-trimesters, enabling an examination of growth trajectories. Growth measurements were then compared for the high- and low-risk fetuses. Mixed linear regression models identified no significant differences between the high- and low-risk fetuses in the rate of prenatal head and body growth throughout the second- and third-trimester (all P-values >0.05). Similarly, there were no significant differences observed when comparing high and low risk groups on a ratio of head circumference relative to body size (β = -0.019, P = 0.75). Future studies may consider looking beyond the macro architecture of the prenatal brain and examine the growth of brain subregions that have been implicated in the presentation of ASD symptoms. Autism Res 2015. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Autism Research 07/2015; DOI:10.1002/aur.1518 · 4.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The caesarean delivery rate in the developed world has been increasing. It is not well understood how caesarean delivery rates have changed by gestational age at birth in Western Australia, particularly in relation to the introduction of the early-term delivery guidelines in Australia in 2006. Data from the Western Australian Midwives Notification System were used to identify 193 136 singletons born to primiparous women at 34-42 weeks' gestation during 1995-2010. Caesarean delivery rates were calculated by gestational age group (34-36 weeks, 37-38 weeks, and 39-42 weeks) and stratified into pre-labour and in-labour caesarean delivery. The average annual per cent change (AAPC) for the caesarean delivery rates was calculated using joinpoint regression. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate the risk of having a caesarean delivery while adjusting for maternal and antenatal factors. Caesarean delivery rates rose steadily from 1995 to 2005 (AAPC = 5.9%, [95% confidence interval (CI) 4.9, 6.9]), but stabilised since then (AAPC = 0.9%, [95% CI -1.9, 3.8]). The rate of in-labour caesarean deliveries rose consistently from 1995 to 2010 across all gestational age groups. The pre-labour caesarean delivery rate rise was most dominant at 37-38 weeks' gestation from 1995 to 2005 (AAPC = 6.8%, [95% CI 5.4, 8.2]), but declined during 2006-10 (AAPC = -4.5, [95% CI -6.7, -2.3]), while at the same time the rate at 39-42 weeks rose slightly. The rise in pre-labour caesarean deliveries during 1995-2005 occurred predominantly at 37-38 weeks' gestation, but declined again from 2006 to 2010. This suggests that the recently developed Australian early-term delivery guidelines may have had some success in reducing early-term deliveries in Western Australia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 07/2015; 29(4):290-8. DOI:10.1111/ppe.12202 · 2.81 Impact Factor
  • Leon Lor · Kylie Hill · Peter Jacoby · Helen Leonard · Jenny Downs
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of using a Bouchard activity record (BAR) in individuals with Rett syndrome to measure physical activity, as compared with pragmatic criterion standard measures of walking status and step counts recorded using the StepWatch activity monitor (SAM). During the waking hours of 1 day, 43 females (mean age 21y, SD 9y) wore a SAM whilst a proxy completed a modified BAR. Responses to the BAR were compared among participants, who were grouped according to walking status, using the Mann-Whitney two-sample rank-sum test. Relationships were sought between BAR responses and step counts using linear regression. According to the proxy-reported BAR responses, those who needed assistance with walking spent more time sitting (median [interquartile range] 9h 15min [8h 8min-10h 30min] vs 6h 15min [4h 15min-8h 30min]; p<0.001) and less time standing (1h [38min-1h 30min] vs 2h 15min [45min-3h 45min]; p=0.04) than those who could walk independently. In those who could walk independently, time classified as 'uptime' (standing and walking) using the BAR was associated with increased step count (r(2) =0.58; p<0.001). These data support the validity of proxy-reported BAR responses. In those who could walk independently, uptime, classified using the BAR, could be used to estimate daily step count. This tool offers an inexpensive method for clinicians to gain insights into physical activity levels in individuals with Rett syndrome. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.
    Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology 06/2015; DOI:10.1111/dmcn.12838 · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: People with intellectual disabilities are at a higher risk for experiencing behavioral, emotional, and psychiatric problems in comparison with the general population. People with Down syndrome have been reported as experiencing fewer behavioral problems than others with intellectual disability, although still at a greater level than the non-intellectually disabled population, except for depression and Alzheimer disease. The aim of this study was to describe the trajectories of subscales of behavior, including depressive symptoms, communication disturbance, anxiety, disruptiveness, and social relating abilities, for young adults with Down syndrome.Families of young adults with Down syndrome living in Perth, Western Australia, participated in a questionnaire study over 8 years, 2004 (n = 255), 2009 (n = 191), and 2011 (n = 188). Questionnaires collected information about young person characteristics and family functioning. The parent-completed Developmental Behavior Checklist-Adult (DBC-A) and Developmental Behavior Checklist-Primary Carer Version (DBC-P) were used to measure emotional and behavioral problems. These measures include the following subscales: disruptive, communication and anxiety disturbances, self-absorbed, antisocial, depressive, and social relating.DBC score declined from 2004 to 2011 reflecting an improvement in behavior in the self-absorbed (coeff -0.011, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.031, -0.008), anxiety (coef -0.009 95%CI -0.129, -0.006), communication disturbances (coeff -0.008, 95% CI -0.012, -0.005) and disruptive/antisocial behavior (coeff -0.013, 95% CI -0.016, -0.009) subscales. Subscales for depressive symptoms and social relating problems decreased less (coeff -0.003, 95% CI -0.007, -0.0001) (coeff -0.003 95% CI -0.007, 0.001). Young people who were lower functioning were reported as exhibiting significantly more behavioral problems across every subscale when compared with those who were higher functioning.Behavior of young adults with Down syndrome improves over time but depressive symptoms and social relating behavior problems persist into adulthood. It is possible that those with persistent depressive symptoms are at a high risk for developing depressive illness in adulthood. Identifying young people with Down syndrome who are at risk for developing depression in adult life has implications for prevention and early treatment.
    Medicine 05/2015; 94(19):1-7. DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000000710 · 4.87 Impact Factor
  • Physiotherapy 05/2015; 101:e326-e327. DOI:10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.529 · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mothers of a child with autism spectrum disorder have more psychiatric disorders after the birth of their child. This might be because they have more psychiatric disorders before the birth, or the increase could be related to the burden of caring for their child. We aimed to calculate the incidence of a psychiatric diagnosis in women with no psychiatric history after the birth of their eldest child with autism spectrum disorder compared to women with no child with autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disability and no psychiatric history. By linking datasets from Western Australian population-based registries, we calculated the incidence of a psychiatric disorder in mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder and compared to mothers of children with no autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disability. Negative binomial regression using STATA 13 was used for all analyses. Apart from alcohol and substance abuse, mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder had higher incidences of all categories of psychiatric disorders than other mothers. The increase of psychiatric disorders in mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder and no psychiatric history compared to similar mothers with no child with autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disability might be due to a pre-existing genetic disposition coupled with an environmental trigger provided by the challenges of raising their children with autism spectrum disorder. In addition, the increased burden borne by the mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder might result in a higher incidence of psychiatric disorders in mothers who are not genetically disposed. © The Author(s) 2015.
    Autism 02/2015; DOI:10.1177/1362361314566048 · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mothers of children with intellectual disability or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have poorer health than other mothers. Yet no research has explored whether this poorer health is reflected in mortality rates or whether certain causes of death are more likely. We aimed to calculate the hazard ratios for death and for the primary causes of death in mothers of children with intellectual disability or ASD compared to other mothers. The study population comprised all mothers of live-born children in Western Australia from 1983-2005. We accessed state-wide databases which enabled us to link socio-demographic details, birth dates, diagnoses of intellectual disability or ASD in the children and dates and causes of death for all mothers who had died prior to 2011. Using Cox Regression with death by any cause and death by each of the three primary causes as the event of interest, we calculated hazard ratios for death for mothers of children intellectual disability or ASD compared to other mothers. During the study period, mothers of children with intellectual disability or ASD had more than twice the risk of death. Mothers of children with intellectual disability were 40% more likely to die of cancer; 150% more likely to die of cardiovascular disease and nearly 200% more likely to die from misadventure than other mothers. Due to small numbers, only hazard ratios for cancer were calculated for mothers of children with ASD. These mothers were about 50% more likely to die from cancer than other mothers. Possible causes and implications of our results are discussed. Similar studies, pooling data from registries elsewhere, would improve our understanding of factors increasing the mortality of mothers of children with intellectual disability or ASD. This would allow the implementation of informed services and interventions to improve these mothers' longevity.
    PLoS ONE 12/2014; 9(12):e113430. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0113430 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background: Rett syndrome is a pervasive neurological disorder with impaired gait as one criterion. This study investigated the capacity of three accelerometer-type devices to measure walking activity in Rett syndrome. Methods: Twenty-six participants (mean 18 years, SD 8) wore an Actigraph, ActivPAL and StepWatch Activity Monitor (SAM) during a video-taped session of activities. Agreement was determined between step-counts derived from each accelerometer and observation. Repeatability of SAM-derived step counts was determined using pairs of one-minute epochs during which the same participant was observed to walk with the same cadence. Results: The mean difference (limit of agreement) for the Actigraph, ActivPAL and SAM were -41 (SD 33), -16 (SD 21) and -1 (SD 16) steps/min, respectively. Agreement was influenced by a device/cadence interaction (p < 0.001) with greater under-recording at higher cadences. For SAM data, repeatability of step-count pairs was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.91, 95% CI 0.79-0.96). The standard error of measurement was 6 steps/min and we would be 95% confident that a change ≥17 steps/min would be greater than within-subject measurement error. Conclusions: The capacity of the SAM to measure physical activity in Rett syndrome allows focus on participation-based activities in clinical practice and clinical trials. Implications for Rehabilitation Many girls and women with Rett syndrome are able to walk on their own or with assistance but with altered movement patterns. Validated measures of physical activity, such as step counts, have potential to monitor function during daily life. Compared with other forms of accelerometer-type devices, such as ActiGraph and ActivPAL, the StepWatch Activity Monitor (SAM) measured step counts with good accuracy and repeatability. The capacity of the SAM to measure physical activity in Rett syndrome allows focus on participation-based activities in clinical practice and clinical trials.
    Disability and Rehabilitation 12/2014; 15:1-5. DOI:10.3109/09638288.2014.993436 · 1.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to examine the relationship between advanced parental age and behavioural outcomes in offspring in a longitudinal cohort of children in Western Australia. The Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) is a prospective study of 2900 pregnancies. Offspring were followed up at ages 2, 5, 8, 10, 14, and 17 years, and 1754 adolescents were available for follow-up at 17 years. The Child Behaviour Checklist was used to measure child behaviour, including internalising (e.g. anxious/withdrawn) and externalising (e.g. aggressive/destructive) behaviours. There was a significant linear relationship between maternal age and total internalising and externalising behaviour outcomes, but not paternal age. Increasing maternal age was associated with decreasing risk for problem behaviours in offspring. In the categorical models, young maternal age (20-24 years) was associated with significantly increased risk for problem behaviours in offspring relative to offspring of parents in the reference group (25-29 years), and a paternal age of 35-39 years was associated with decreased risk for total behaviour morbidity in offspring. This study showed no evidence that late fatherhood is associated with adverse behavioural outcomes in offspring. Increasing maternal age was found to be a protective factor for child behaviour morbidity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 12/2014; 29(1). DOI:10.1111/ppe.12165 · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rett syndrome is one of many severe neurodevelopmental disorders with feeding difficulties. In this study, associations between feeding difficulties, age, MECP2 genotype, and utilization of gastrostomy were investigated. Weight change and family satisfaction following gastrostomy were explored.Data from the longitudinal Australian Rett Syndrome Database whose parents provided data in the 2011 family questionnaire (n = 229) were interrogated. We used logistic regression to model relationships between feeding difficulties, age group, and genotype. Content analysis was used to analyze data on satisfaction following gastrostomy.In those who had never had gastrostomy and who fed orally (n = 166/229), parents of girls <7 years were more concerned about food intake compared with their adult peers (odds ratio [OR] 4.26; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29, 14.10). Those with a p.Arg168 mutation were often perceived as eating poorly with nearly a 6-fold increased odds of choking compared to the p.Arg133Cys mutation (OR 5.88; 95% CI 1.27, 27.24). Coughing, choking, or gagging during meals was associated with increased likelihood of later gastrostomy. Sixty-six females (28.8%) had a gastrostomy, and in those, large MECP2 deletions and p.Arg168 mutations were common. Weight-for-age z-scores increased by 0.86 (95% CI 0.41, 1.31) approximately 2 years after surgery. Families were satisfied with gastrostomy and felt less anxious about the care of their child.Mutation type provided some explanation for feeding difficulties. Gastrostomy assisted the management of feeding difficulties and poor weight gain, and was acceptable to families. Our findings are likely applicable to the broader community of children with severe disability.
    Medicine 12/2014; 93(28):e328. DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000000328 · 4.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mothers of a child with intellectual disability (ID) have more psychiatric disorders after the birth of their child than other mothers. However, it is unclear if this is because they have more psychiatric disorders before the birth or if the increase is related to the burden of caring for the child. We aimed to calculate the rate of new psychiatric disorders in mothers after the birth of their eldest child with ID born between 1983 and 2005 and to compare these with rates in women with a child with no ID or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) born during the same period. By linking data from Western Australian population-based registries, we selected women with no psychiatric history who survived the birth of their live-born child (N = 277,559) and compared rates of psychiatric disorders for women with a child with ID and women without a child with or ASD. Negative binomial regression with STATA 12 was used for all analyses. Mothers of children with mild-moderate ID of unknown cause had around two to three and a half times the rate of psychiatric disorders of mothers of children without ID or ASD. Mothers of children with Down syndrome and no pre-existing psychiatric disorder showed resilience and had no impairments in their mental health. Interventions and services are needed for mothers of other children with ID to improve their mental health. Further research is implicated to explore the mental health of mothers of children with ID and a pre-existing psychiatric disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Psychiatric Research 11/2014; 61. DOI:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.11.011 · 4.09 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Eating Disorders 11/2014; 2(Suppl 1):O58-O58. DOI:10.1186/2050-2974-2-S1-O58
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Systematic reviews suggest that a longer duration of breast-feeding is associated with a reduction in the risk of later overweight and obesity. Most studies examining breast-feeding in relation to adiposity have not used longitudinal analysis. In our study, we aimed to examine early infant feeding and adiposity risk in a longitudinal cohort from birth to young adulthood using new as well as published data. Methods: Data from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study in Perth, W.A., Australia, were used to examine associations between breast-feeding and measures of adiposity at 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, 10, 14, 17, and 20 years. Results: Breast-feeding was measured in a number of ways. Longer breast-feeding (in months) was associated with reductions in weight z-scores between birth and 1 year (β = -0.027; p Discussion: Breast-feeding until 6 months of age and beyond should be encouraged and is recommended for protection against increased adiposity in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Adverse long-term effects of early growth acceleration are fundamental in later overweight and obesity. Formula feeding stimulates a higher postnatal growth velocity, whereas breast-feeding promotes slower growth and a reduced likelihood of overweight and obesity. Biological mechanisms underlying the protective effect of breast-feeding against obesity are based on the unique composition and metabolic and physiological responses to human milk.
    Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism 11/2014; 64(3-4):262-70. DOI:10.1159/000365031 · 2.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Adequate Zn and Mg intakes may be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of mental health problems, such as depression, anxiety and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. We aimed to investigate the prospective association between dietary intakes of Zn and Mg and internalising and externalising behaviour problems in a population-based cohort of adolescents. Design Prospective analysis (general linear mixed models) of dietary intakes of Zn and Mg assessed using a validated FFQ and mental health symptoms assessed using the Youth Self-Report (YSR), adjusting for sex, physical activity, family income, supplement status, dietary misreporting, BMI, family functioning and energy intake. Setting Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Subjects Adolescents ( n 684) at the 14- and 17-year follow-ups. Results Higher dietary intake of Mg (per sd increase) was significantly associated with reduced externalising behaviours ( β =−1·45; 95 % CI −2·40, −0·50; P =0·003). There was a trend towards reduced externalising behaviours with higher Zn intake (per sd increase; β =−0·73; 95 % CI −1·57, 0·10; P =0·085). Conclusions The study shows an association between higher dietary Mg intake and reduced externalising behaviour problems in adolescents. We observed a similar trend, although not statistically significant, for Zn intake. Randomised controlled trials are necessary to determine any benefit of micronutrient supplementation in the prevention and treatment of mental health problems in adolescents.
    Public Health Nutrition 11/2014; 74(OCE1):1-7. DOI:10.1017/S1368980014002432 · 2.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Intussusception, a condition where one segment of intestine invaginates into another, occurs predominantly in infants and young children. A number of potential causes have been identified including infectious agents and rotavirus vaccination. Following the introduction of rotavirus vaccination of infants in Western Australia, a laboratory surveillance programme testing notified intussusception cases for infectious agents was commenced. This led to a PCR-based study of the association between gastrointestinal viruses and intussusception.Objectives Conduct viral testing on stool samples from intussusception patients to determine viruses that may have an association with intussusception.Study designA retrospective case–control study was conducted using stool samples collected from children with intussusception (n = 74) and matched controls (n = 289) between 2008 and 2011. Samples were tested for rotavirus, norovirus, adenovirus, enterovirus, rhinovirus, astrovirus, parechovirus and bocavirus. Adenovirus, enterovirus and rhinovirus species were determined by DNA sequencing.ResultsHuman adenovirus C was detected in significantly more cases than controls with 31/74 (41.9%) cases testing positive compared to 39/289 (13.49%) controls (OR = 4.38, p < 0.001). A significant difference was seen in Enterovirus B detections with 11/74 (14.9%) cases testing positive compared to 21/289 (7.3%) controls (OR = 2.24, p = 0.04). Rotavirus was detected in 7/74 (9.46%) cases and 11/289 (3.81%) controls, which was also a significant difference (OR = 2.88, p = 0.045).Conclusions Our results show that intussusception is associated with non-enteric adenovirus infections, and Enterovirus B infections. While a statistical association was seen with rotavirus and intussusception, we were not able to determine if this was related to vaccine strain or wild type rotavirus.
    Journal of Clinical Virology 11/2014; 61(4). DOI:10.1016/j.jcv.2014.10.018 · 3.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The role of vitamin D in curtailing the development of obesity and comorbidities such as the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes has received much attention recently. However, clinical trials have failed to conclusively demonstrate the benefits of vitamin D supplementation. In most studies, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] decreases with increasing BMI above normal weight. These low 25(OH)D levels may also be a proxy for reduced exposure to sunlight-derived ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Here we investigate whether UVR and/or vitamin D supplementation modifies the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes in a murine model of obesity. Long-term suberythemal and erythemal UVR significantly suppressed weight gain, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease measures; and serum levels of fasting insulin, glucose, and cholesterol in C57BL/6 male mice fed a high-fat diet. However, many of the benefits of UVR were not reproduced by vitamin D supplementation. In further mechanistic studies, skin induction of the UVR-induced mediator nitric oxide (NO) reproduced many of the effects of UVR. These studies suggest that UVR (sunlight exposure) may be an effective means of suppressing the development of obesity and MetS, through mechanisms that are independent of vitamin D but dependent on other UVR-induced mediators such as NO.
    Diabetes 10/2014; 63(11):3759-3769. DOI:10.2337/db13-1675 · 8.47 Impact Factor
  • Clinical Infectious Diseases 10/2014; 60(2). DOI:10.1093/cid/ciu829 · 9.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Young adults with Down syndrome experience increased rates of emotional and behavioural problems compared with the general population. Most adolescents with Down syndrome living in Western Australia participate in sheltered employment as their main day occupation. Relationship between day occupation and changes in behaviour has not been examined. Therefore, the aim of this research was to explore any relationship between post school day occupations and changes in the young person¿s behaviour.Methods The Down syndrome Needs Opinion Wishes database was used for case ascertainment of young adults aged 15 to 32 years with Down syndrome. Families of 118 young people in this population-based database completed questionnaires in 2004, 2009 and 2011. The questionnaires addressed both young person characteristics such as age, gender, presence of impairments, behaviour, functioning in activities of daily living, and family characteristics such as income and family functioning. Post-school day occupations in which the young people were participating included open and sheltered employment, training and day recreation programs. Change in behaviour of young adults who remained in the same post-school day occupation from 2009 to 2011 (n¿=¿103) were examined in a linear regression model adjusting for confounding variables including age, gender, prior functioning and behaviour in 2004 and family income.ResultsIn comparison to those young adults attending open employment from 2009 to 2011, those attending day recreation programs were reported to experience worsening in behaviour both in the unadjusted (effect size ¿0.14, 95%CI ¿0.24, ¿0.05) and adjusted models (effect size ¿0.15, 95%CI ¿0.29, ¿0.01).Conclusions We found that the behaviour of those participating in open employment improved compared to those attending other day occupations. Further examination of the direction of this association is required.
    BMC Psychiatry 10/2014; 14(1):266. DOI:10.1186/s12888-014-0266-z · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background The concept of disability is now understood as a result of the interaction between the individual, features related to impairment, and the physical and social environment. It is important to understand these environmental influences and how they affect social participation. The purpose of this study is to describe the social participation of young adults with Down syndrome and examine its relationship with the physical and social environment. Methods Families ascertained from the Down syndrome ‘Needs Opinion Wishes’ database completed questionnaires during 2011. The questionnaires contained two parts, young person characteristics and family characteristics. Young adults’ social participation was measured using the Assessment of Life Habits (LIFE-H) and the influences of environmental factors were measured by the Measure of the Quality of the Environment (MQE). The analysis involved descriptive statistics and linear and logistic regression. Results Overall, participation in daily activities was higher (mean 6.45) than in social roles (mean 5.17) (range 0 to 9). When the physical and/or social environment was reported as a facilitator, compared to being no influence or a barrier, participation in social roles was greater (coef 0.89, 95%CI 0.28, 1.52, coef 0.83, 95%CI 0.17, 1.49, respectively). The relationships between participation and both the physical (coef 0.60, 95% CI −0.40, 1.24) and social (coef 0.20, 95%CI −0.47, 0.87) environments were reduced when age, gender, behavior and functioning in ADL were taken into account. Conclusion We found that young adults’ participation in social roles was influenced more by the physical environment than by the social environment, providing a potentially modifiable avenue for intervention.
    PLoS ONE 09/2014; 9(9):e108413. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0108413 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rett syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder usually affecting females, and is associated with a mutation in the MECP2 gene. Sleep problems occur commonly and we investigated the trajectories and influences of age, mutation and treatments. Data were collected at six time points over 12 years from 320 families registered with the Australian Rett Syndrome Database. Regression analysis was used to investigate relationships between sleep disturbances, age, mutation type and use of treatment, and latent class growth analysis was performed to identify sleep problem phenotypes and model the effect of mutation type. The age range of subjects was 2.0-35.8 years. The study showed that sleep problems occurred in more than 80% of individuals and the prevalence decreased with age. Night laughing and night screaming occurred in 77 and 49%, respectively, when younger. Those with a large deletion had a higher prevalence of night laughing, which often occurred frequently. Treatment was associated with a 1.7% reduction in risk of further sleep problems. High and low baseline prevalence groups were identified. Approximately three-quarters of girls and women with sleep disturbances were in the high baseline group and problems persisted into adulthood. Conversely, 57% with night laughing and 42% with night screaming in the high baseline group exhibited mild improvement over time. Mutation type was not found to be a significant predictor of group membership. In conclusion, the evolution of sleep problems differed between subgroups of girls and women with Rett syndrome, in part explained by age and genotype. Treatment was not associated with improvement in sleep problems.
    Journal of Sleep Research 09/2014; 24(2). DOI:10.1111/jsr.12240 · 2.95 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
397.88 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2015
    • Telethon Kids Institute
      Western Australia, Australia
  • 2011–2014
    • Western Australia Health
      Perth City, Western Australia, Australia
  • 2005–2014
    • University of Western Australia
      • Centre for Health Services Research
      Perth City, Western Australia, Australia
  • 2013
    • Edith Cowan University
      • School of Exercise and Health Sciences
      Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia