Hye-Jin Kim

Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (8)34.13 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The mammalian genome encodes multiple variants of histone H3 including H3.1/H3.2 and H3.3. In contrast to H3.1/H3.2, H3.3 is enriched in the actively transcribed euchromatin and the telomeric heterochromatins. However, the mechanism for H3.3 to incorporate into the different domains of chromatin is not known. Here, taking the advantage of well-defined transcription analysis system of yeast, we attempted to understand the molecular mechanism of selective deposition of human H3.3 into actively transcribed genes. We show that there are systemic H3 substrate-selection mechanisms operating even in yeasts, which encode a single type of H3. Yeast HIR complex mediated H3-specific recognition specificity for deposition of H3.3 in the transcribed genes. A critical component of this process was the H3 A-IG code composed of amino acids 87, 89 and 90. The preference toward H3.3 was completely lost when HIR subunits were absent and partially suppressed by human HIRA. Asf1 allows the influx of H3, regardless of H3 type. We propose that H3.3 is introduced into the active euchromatin by targeting the recycling pathway that is mediated by HIRA (or HIR), and this H3-selection mechanism is highly conserved through the evolution. These results also uncover an unexpected role of RI chaperones in evolution of variant H3s.
    Nucleic Acids Research 04/2013; · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    Hye-Jin Kim, Ja-Hwan Seol, Eun-Jung Cho
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    ABSTRACT: The eukaryotic genome forms a chromatin structure that contains repeating nucleosome structures. Nucleosome packaging is regulated by chromatin remodeling factors such as histone chaperones. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae H3/H4 histone chaperones, CAF-1 and Asf1, regulate DNA replication and chromatin assembly. CAF-1 function is largely restricted to non-transcriptional processes in heterochromatin, whereas Asf1 regulates transcription together with another H3/H4 chaperone, HIR. This study examined the role of the yeast H3/H4 histone chaperones, Asf1, HIR, and CAF-1 in chromatin dynamics during transcription. Unexpectedly, CAF-1 was recruited to the actively transcribed region in a similar way to HIR and Asf1. In addition, the three histone chaperones genetically interacted with Set2-dependent H3 K36 methylation. Similar to histone chaperones, Set2 was required for tolerance to excess histone H3 but not to excess H2A, suggesting that CAF-1, Asf1, HIR, and Set2 function in a related pathway and target chromatin during transcription.
    BMB reports 05/2009; 42(4):227-31. · 1.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To understand the role of histone H3 sub-domains in chromatin function, 35 histone H3 tandem alanine mutants were generated and tested for their viability and sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Among 13 non-viable H3 mutants, 6 were mapped around the alphaN helix and preceding tail region. Mutants with individual alanine substitutions in this region were viable but developed multiple sensitivities to DNA damaging agents. The only viable triple mutant, REI49-50A, in the alphaN helix region could not grow when combined with histone chaperone mutations, such as asf1Delta, cac1Delta, or hir1Delta, suggesting that this particular region is important when the histone assembly/disassembly pathway is compromised. In addition, further analysis showed that T45, E50, or F54 of the alphaN helix genetically interacted with a histone chaperone (Asf1) and transcription elongation factors (Paf1 and Hpr1). These results suggest a specific role of the H3 alphaN helix in histone dynamics mediated by histone chaperones, which might be important during transcription elongation.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 09/2008; 374(3):543-8. · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Transcription by RNA polymerase II is accompanied by dynamic changes in chromatin, including the eviction/deposition of nucleosomes or the covalent modification of histone subunits. This study examined the role of the histone H3/H4 chaperones, Asf1 and HIR, in histone mobility during transcription, with particular focus on the histone exchange pathway, using a dual histone expression system. The results showed that the exchange of H3/H4 normally occurs during transcription by the histone chaperones. Both Asf1 and HIR are important for histone deposition but have a different effect on histone exchange. While Asf1 mediated incorporation of external H3/H4 and renewal of pre-existing histones, HIR opposed it. The balance of two opposing activities might be an important mechanism for determining current chromatin states.
    The EMBO Journal 11/2007; 26(21):4467-74. · 9.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Histone H3 methyltransferases are involved in the epigenetic control of transcription and heterochromatin maintenance. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, deletion of a histone H3 methyltransferase SET1 leads to the induction of a subset of stress responsive genes in a Rad53 dependent manner. This type of induction was observed only in the absence of SET1 and not in the absence of other histone methyltransferases, SET2 or DOT1. We show that the increased expression of the stress responsive genes results from a lack of histone H3 lysine (K) 4 methylation. The loss of mono-methylation on H3 K4 is necessary to increase the expression of the stress responsive genes, while the loss of di- or tri-methylation induced by deletion of either RRM domain of Set1 or the upstream effector molecules hardly affected their expression. These results suggest that mono- and multiple methylation of H3 K4 have different roles. The mono-methylation of H3 K4 might be required for the global integrity of chromatin structure, which is normally monitored by the Rad53 dependent chromatin surveillance system.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 11/2006; 349(2):463-70. · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The phosphorylation of C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpb1p, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II plays an important role in transcription and the coupling of various cellular events to transcription. In this study, its role in DNA damage response is closely examined in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, focusing specifically on several transcription factors that mediate or respond to the phosphorylation of the CTD. CTDK-1, the pol II CTD kinase, FCP1, the CTD phosphatase, ESS1, the CTD phosphorylation dependent cis-trans isomerase, and RSP5, the phosphorylation dependent pol II ubiquitinating enzyme, were chosen for the study. We determined that the CTD phosphorylation of CTD, which occurred predominantly at serine 2 within a heptapeptide repeat, was enhanced in response to a variety of sources of DNA damage. This modification was shown to be mediated by CTDK-1. Although mutations in ESS1 or FCP1 caused cells to become quite sensitive to DNA damage, the characteristic pattern of CTD phosphorylation remained unaltered, thereby implying that ESS1 and FCP1 play roles downstream of CTD phosphorylation in response to DNA damage. Our data suggest that the location or extent of CTD phosphorylation might be altered in response to DNA damage, and that the modified CTD, ESS1, and FCP1 all contribute to cellular survival in such conditions.
    The Journal of Microbiology 01/2006; 43(6):516-22. · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cells change their gene expression profile dynamically in various conditions. By taking the advantage of ChIP, we examined the transcription profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes in response to DNA damaging agents such as MMS or 4NQO. Gene expression profiles of different groups of genes roughly correlated with that revealed by Northern blot assay or microarray method. Damage-inducible genes showed increased cross-linking signals of RNA polymerase II, TFIIH, and TFIIF, meanwhile damage repressible genes decreased them, which means that gene expression is mainly regulated at the level of transcription. Interestingly, the characteristic occupancy pattern of TFIIH and polymerase with phosphorylated carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) in promoter or in coding regions was not changed by the presence of DNA damaging agents in both non-inducible and inducible genes. ChIP data showed that the extent of phosphorylation of CTD per elongating polymerase complex was still maintained. These findings suggest that overall increase in CTD phosphorylation in response to DNA damage is attributed to the global shift of gene expression profile rather than modification of specific polymerase function.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 12/2004; 325(3):892-8. · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: One of the temperature-sensitive alleles of CEG1, a guanylyltransferase subunit of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae capping enzyme, showed 6-azauracil (6AU) sensitivity at the permissive growth temperature, which is a phenotype that is correlated with a transcription elongation defect. This temperature-sensitive allele, ceg1-63, has an impaired ability to induce PUR5 in response to 6AU treatment and diminished enzyme-GMP formation activity. However, this cellular and molecular defect is not primarily due to the preferential degradation of the transcript attributed to a lack of cap structure. Our data suggest that the guanylyltransferase subunit of the capping enzyme plays a role in transcription elongation as well as cap formation. First, in addition to the 6AU sensitivity, ceg1-63 is synthetically lethal with elongation-defective mutations in RNA polymerase II. Secondly, it produces a prolonged steady-state level of GAL1 mRNA after glucose shutoff. Third, it decreases the transcription read through a tandem array of promoter-proximal pause sites in an orientation-dependent manner. Taken together, we present direct evidence that suggests a role of capping enzyme in an early transcription. Capping enzyme ensures the early transcription checkpoint by capping of the nascent transcript in time and allowing it to extend further.
    Molecular and Cellular Biology 08/2004; 24(14):6184-93. · 5.37 Impact Factor