Apiradee Theamboonlers

Chulalongkorn University, Krung Thep, Bangkok, Thailand

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Publications (228)441.53 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreaks are often attributed to viral infection. In 2014, an unprecedented nationwide outbreak of infectious conjunctivitis occurred in Thailand, which affected >300 000 individuals over 3 months. To identify and characterize the virus responsible for the epidemic, eye swab specimens from 119 patients were randomly collected from five different provinces. Conserved regions in the enteroviral 5'-UTR and adenovirus hexon gene were analysed. Enterovirus was identified in 71·43% (85/119) of the samples, while no adenovirus was detected. From enterovirus-positive samples, the coxsackievirus A24 variant (70·59%, 84/119) and echovirus (0·84%, 1/119) were identified. Additional sequencing of full-length VP1 and 3C genes and subsequent phylogenetic analysis revealed that these clinical isolates form a new lineage cluster related to genotype IV-C5. In summary, the coxsackievirus A24 variant was identified as an aetiological agent for the recent acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreak in Thailand.
    Epidemiology and Infection 03/2015; DOI:10.1017/S0950268815000643 · 2.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Serum hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen (HCVcAg) concentrations correlate with HCV RNA levels in HCV monoinfected patients. Data in HCV/HIV coinfected patients are still limited. We aim to compare the use of HCVcAg measurement with respect to HIV status, HCV genotypes, interferon-lambda-4 (IFNL4) polymorphism and clinical parameters. Methods: We analyzed an untreated cohort of 104 patients with HCV monoinfection and 85 patients with HCV/HIV coinfection. Serum HCVcAg was measured by a commercial chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. The presence of IFNL4 polymorphism ss469415590 was identified by real-time PCR. Results: log10 HCVcAg levels were significantly correlated with corresponding log10 HCV RNA levels (r = 0.889, p < 0.001), but not with ALT levels and liver stiffness. The correlation between HCV RNA and HCVcAg was particularly high in coinfected patients and those with high viremia. Mean log10 HCVcAg concentration was significantly higher in coinfected patients than in monoinfected patients. Patients harboring the TT/TT genotype of ss469415590 had significantly higher levels of log10 HCVcAg than those with the non-TT/TT genotype. HCVcAg levels were similar across HCV genotypes. Conclusions: HCVcAg concentrations had an excellent correlation with HCV RNA levels, particularly in HCV/HIV-coinfected individuals and might be associated with IFNL4 polymorphism. HCVcAg testing could be used as an alternative to HCV RNA assays in resource-limited settings. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    Intervirology 01/2015; 58(2):73-79. DOI:10.1159/000370070 · 1.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An age distribution shift in diphtheria cases during a 2012 outbreak in northeastern of Thailand suggests adults are increasingly at risk for infection in Thailand. Data regarding immunity against diphtheria among the adult Thai population is limited. We review a 2012 diphtheria outbreak in Thailand and conducted a nationwide seroepidemiological survey to determine the prevalence of diphtheria antibodies among Thai adults in order to inform immunization programs. A total of 41 confirmed cases, 6 probable cases and 101 carriers of diphtheria were reported from northeastern and upper southern Thailand. The diphtheria outbreak in northeastern Thailand occurred among adults aged > or =15 years; sporadic cases occurred among children from upper southern Thailand. We conducted a seroepidemiological survey of 890 Thai adults from 4 age groups (20-29, 30-39, 40-49 and 50-59 years) in 7 different geographical areas of Thailand (Chiang Mai, Ratchaburi, Chon Buri, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Phitsanulok, Khon Kaen and Songkhla). Diptheria toxin antibody levels were measured with a commercially available ELISA test. The seroprotection rate ranged from 83% to 99%, with the highest in eastern Thailand (Chon Buri, 99%) and the lowest in northern Thailand (Chiang Mai, 83%). Diphtheria antibodies declined with increasing age. We recommend one doseof diphtheria-tetanus toxoid (dT) vaccine once after 20 years of age in order to boost the antibody and revaccinations every 10 years to prevent future outbreaks.
    The Southeast Asian journal of tropical medicine and public health 09/2014; 45(5):1132-41. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To report clinical outcomes and viral genotypes of acute symptomatic hepatitis E virus (HEY) infection in Thailand. Methods: Forty patients with acute symptomatic HEY infection were recruited during 2009-2013. Clinical, demographic and laboratory data were collected. Diagnosis was accomplished by detection of anti-HEY IgM and/or HEY RNA in the serum or stool. HEY genotypes were classified by direct sequencing of RT-PCR products and phylogenetic analysis. Results: The high risk group, comprising immune-compromised, liver cirrhosis and very elderly (>80 years) patients (17 cases), had higher levels of serum alkaline phosphatase at presentation compared with the low risk group. Two fatal cases resulted from acute hepatitis E in the high risk group. Initial clinical presentation did not show statistically significant differences. In six cases (6/40), the virus could tic detected in scrum or stool by RT-PCR and sequencing. Upon molecular characterization, the viruses were classified as HEV genotype 3f and were in the same cluster as Thai swine REV. Conclusions: Our data showed that acute HEY infection has various clinical presentations and outcomes. Higher levels of serum alkaline phosphatase were observed in high risk patients. All isolated viruses were identified as HEY genotype 3f possibly originating from swine.
    Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine 09/2014; 7(9):709-14. DOI:10.1016/S1995-7645(14)60121-8 · 0.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Timely antibiotic initiation for acute pyelonephritis (APN) can prevent renal complications. We investigated whether urine heparin binding protein (UHBP), a cytokine released from activated neutrophils, was a useful diagnostic tool for APN. Febrile children with presumed APN were prospectively enrolled between January and September 2013, and divided into two groups based on urine cultures. UHBP levels were measured at enrollment in all children and 1 month after antibiotic treatment in children with APN. UHBP levels in children with APN at baseline and 1 month versus controls were 47.0 ± 8.4 and 16.6 ± 3.8 vs. 15.0 ± 2.9 ng/mL, respectively (p < 0.001). Test performance characteristics were calculated against a gold standard of positive urine cultures and compared with leukocyte esterase (LE) and nitrite measured by dipsticks and pyuria by microscopy. The sensitivity and specificity for UHBP levels ≥34 ng/mL were 100 and 100 %. Spearman's rank coefficient was used to assess the associations between routine laboratory tests and UHBP levels. Significant positive correlations were found with pyuria grade (Spearman's rho = 0.62; p < 0.001), neutrophil count (rho = 0.38; p = 0.03), and platelet count (rho = 0.39; p = 0.03). Conclusions: UHBP is a valid adjunctive diagnostic tool for aiding clinicians in making rapid treatment decisions for APN.
    European Journal of Pediatrics 06/2014; 174(1). DOI:10.1007/s00431-014-2362-y · 1.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) and herpangina are common infectious diseases caused by several genotypes of human enterovirus species A and frequently occurring in young children. This study was aimed at analyzing enteroviruses from patients with these diseases in Thailand in 2012. Detection and genotype determination of enteroviruses were accomplished by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of the VP1 region. Enterovirus-positive samples were differentiated into 17 genotypes (coxsackievirus A4 (CAV4), A5, A6, A8, A9, A10, A12, A16, A21, B1, B2, B4, B5, echovirus 7, 16, 25 and Enterovirus 71). The result showed CAV6 (33.5%), followed by CAV16 (9.4%) and EV71 (8.8%) as the most frequent genotypes in HFMD, CAV8 (19.3%) in herpangina and CAV6 (1.5%) in influenza like illness. Enterovirus infections were most prevalent during July with 34.4% in HFMD, 39.8% in herpangina and 1.6% in ILI. The higher enterovirus infection associated with HFMD and herpangina occurred in infants over one year-old. This represents the first report describing the circulation of multiple enteroviruses in Thailand.
    PLoS ONE 06/2014; 9(6):e98888. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0098888 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory illness in infants and young children. In order to classify the HPIV isolates circulating in the central part of Thailand, 650 samples obtained from the lower respiratory tract of patients from two hospital pediatric wards during 2010 to 2013, were analyzed for the presence and types of HPIVs by multiplex semi-nested PCR of hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene. The results showed that 4.8% of the samples were positive for HPIV, among which 0.5%, 2.5% and 1.5% were positive for HPIV-1, HPIV-3, and HPIV-4, respectively, and none were positive for HPIV-2. A phylogenetic tree constructed from 31 HPIV HN gene sequences compared to those in GenBank showed greater than 80% identity to other reference strains. Prevalence of HPIV infection and phylogenetic characteristics of the circulating HPIVs may help explain the impact of HPIVs infection in Thai children.
    The Southeast Asian journal of tropical medicine and public health 05/2014; 45(3):610-21. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Emergence of viruses belonging to the coronavirus family has been widespread in the past, causing respiratory infections in humans, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This study investigated the prevalence of human coronavirus (HCoV) and characterized the molecular viral genetics. We collected 1,254 samples from patients diagnosed with respiratory infection in southern Thailand from July 2009 to January 2011 and screened for HCoV by RT-PCR and genotyped by BLAST analysis of nsp12 gene. Phylogenetic analysis was performed based on S gene sequences. Thirty-five of 1,254 samples were positive for HCoV. Viral genotyping revealed 4 genotypes with HCoV-OC43 being the predominant genotype. Viral prevalence and genotype distribution were not in accordance with seasonal distribution. Phylogenetic analysis and deduced amino acid sequences of the S gene showed amino acid variations in each genotype. The S gene sequence of HCoV-OC43 genotype indicated that it resulted from recombination between subgenotypes B and C. Viral genetics analysis disclosed genetic variations of HCoV and additionally, it can provide information suitable for monitoring and prevention of the emergence and re-emergence of various types of coronavirus.
    The Southeast Asian journal of tropical medicine and public health 03/2014; 45(2):326-36. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rapid tests are widely used to detect rotavirus A; however, pediatricians are concerned whether the rapid test can still accurately detect the virus. Therefore, this study evaluated the performance of the rotavirus rapid test by comparing it to the one-step RT-PCR method. Seven hundred fifty-five stool samples were collected from children with acute diarrhea. All samples were processed immediately after arrival with the SD BIOLINE rota rapid test and one-step RT-PCR method. The detection rates of rotavirus A were 40.79% and 41.91% for the rapid test and one-step RT-PCR, respectively. The rapid test had 93.57% sensitivity and 96.17% specificity. Most of the different genotypes of rotavirus A were detected with the SD rapid test. Although the rapid test is able to quickly give results, we found that it has high false positive and negative rates. Thus, other highly sensitive methods such as one-step RT-PCR are still required for true diagnosis.
    Clinical laboratory 01/2014; 60(3):511-4. DOI:10.7754/Clin.Lab.2013.130616 · 1.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Influenza A virus is a major cause of influenza pandemics and can infect several host species including humans and animals. The objective of this study was to develop a one-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay (LAMP) for the detection of genetically diverse influenza A viruses from both human and animal hosts. First, a set of two inner and two outer primers were designed based on the conserved region of the matrix (M) gene of influenza A viruses. The amplification reaction was optimized at 63 o C for 60 min and performed in a simple heat block. The amplicons could be visualized either by gel electrophoresis or by visual analysis upon addition of SybrGreen. The developed LAMP assay was tested with 50 influenza A isolates including H1N1, H1N2, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N4 from swine, avian and human hosts. In sensitivity test, the assay detection capability was ten times more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR and comparable to real time RT-PCR. In summary, this assay is a rapid, simple and sensitive assay suitable for less-equipped laboratories and thus can be utilized in the field as a screening test.
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    ABSTRACT: This study has identified diverse and re-assorted group A rotavirus (RVA) strains by sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the 11 genomic segments. The 22 cases investigated in this study were collected from children with diarrhea between 2008-2011. The RVA genomic constellations identified in this study were identified as G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 22.7% (5/22); G2-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 27.3% (6/22); G3-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 18.2% (4/22); G3-P[9]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A3-N3-T3-E3-H6 4.6% (1/22); G9-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 9.1% (2/22); G12-P[6]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 4.6% (1/22) and G12-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 13.6% (3/22). Two RVA strains, possessing a complete AU-1-like genomic backbone, showed reassortment for genes 3 and 11, revealing possible zoonotic reassortment events between human and canine strains. In addition, one of the analyzed strains revealed a G12 specificity for VP7 in combination with a porcine-like P[6] VP4 and a complete Wa-like constellation. Continuous surveillance of rotavirus strains and their evolution may be useful for understanding the emergence of novel strains through interspecies genome re-assortment between human and animal viruses.
    Infection, genetics and evolution: journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases 11/2013; 21. DOI:10.1016/j.meegid.2013.11.020 · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We performed phylogenetic and sequence analysis by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) of a complete Human Rotavirus (HRV) genome isolated from a hospitalized child with acute gastroenteritis in Thailand. The results indicated an uncommon strain characterized by multiple re-assortments in the VP3, VP4, VP6, NSP1, NSP4 and NSP5 genes. The uncommon strain is genotype G3-P[9]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A3-N3-T3-E3-H6, which displays aspects of the AU-1, FRV-1 and corresponds to the feline/canine prototype G3P[9] strain. The results suggested that nearly all the eleven gene segments of G3P[9] RVA strain CU365 might have originated from feline/canine RVAs (Rotavirus A).
    SpringerPlus 10/2013; 2:569. DOI:10.1186/2193-1801-2-569
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated influenza activity in Bangkok, Thailand between June 2009 and July 2012. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to detect influenza viruses among patients with influenza-like illnesses. Of the 6417 patients tested, influenza virus infection was detected in 42% (n = 2697) of the specimens. Influenza A pH1N1 viruses comprised the predominant strain between 2009 and 2010, and seasonal influenza (H3) had a high prevalence in 2011. Laboratory data showed a prevalence and seasonal pattern of influenza viruses. In 2009, influenza activity peaked in July, the rainy season. In 2010, influenza activity happened in two phases, with the initial one at the beginning of the year and another peak between June and August 2010, which again corresponded to the rainy period. Influenza activity was low for several consecutive weeks at the beginning of 2011, and high H3N2 activity was recorded during the rainy season between July and September 2011. However, from the beginning of 2012 through July 2012, pH1N1, influenza H3N2, and influenza B viruses continuously circulated at a very low level. The seasonal pattern of influenza activity in Thailand tended to peak during rainy season between July and September.
    The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries 10/2013; 7(10):734-740. DOI:10.3855/jidc.2929 · 1.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Acute hepatitis A is a worldwide public health problem especially in developing countries. Recently, a large, community-wide outbreak of hepatitis A occurred in the northeast part of Thailand. Methods: Demographic and clinical data as well as blood samples were collected and analyzed from patients with acute hepatitis who attended the Buengkan Provincial Hospital from June to September 2012. About 1619 patients with clinical symptoms of hepatitis A visited the hospital during the outbreak which manifested in three waves. Blood samples were collected from 205 patients. Results: One hundred and seventy eight patients had hepatitis A confirmed by the presence of anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) IgM and/or HAV-RNA. The sensitivities for anti-HAV IgM and HAV-RNA were 95·5% (170/178) and 61·8% (110/178), respectively. When HAV-RNA was combined with anti-HAV IgM test, this increased the diagnostic yield by 7·2% (8/111) in the early phase of the acute infection (less than 5 days). Investigation of the molecular structure of the detected viruses indicated that all of the infections were caused by HAV genotype IA. There were no fatalities from this outbreak. Rapid detection, health education, sanitation campaigns, and vaccination offered on a voluntary basis have steadily reduced the number of infected patients and stopped the outbreak. Conclusion: Occasionally a large-scale outbreak of HAV genotype IA can occur. A combination of HAV-RNA and anti-HAV IgM tests can increase the diagnostic yield during the early phase of the acute infection. Early diagnosis and preventive management campaigns can slow down and stop the outbreak.
    10/2013; 107(7):367-72. DOI:10.1179/2047773213Y.0000000116
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    ABSTRACT: This study reports the molecular epidemiology and genetic characterization of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) samples collected in Thailand from January 2010 to December 2011. In total, 1,315 clinical samples were collected from Bangkok and Khon Kaen provinces and were screened by semi-nested PCR for RSV infection. We found 74 samples (27.7 %) and 71 samples (6.8 %) to be RSV positive for Bangkok and Khon Kaen, respectively, and we sequenced 122 of these samples. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 100 of the RSV-A-positive samples clustered into either genotype NA1 or the recently discovered genotype ON1 strain, which has a 72-nucleotide duplication in the second variable region of its G protein. Moreover, 22 of the RSV-B-positive samples clustered into four genotypes; BA4, BA9, BA10 and genotype THB, first described here. The NA1 genotype was found to be the predominant strain in 2010 and 2011. The ON1 strain detected in this study first emerged in 2011 and is genetically similar to ON1 strains characterized in other counties. We also describe the THB genotype, which was first identified in 2005 and is genetically similar to the GB2 genotype. In conclusion, this study indicates the importance of molecular epidemiology and characterization of RSV in Thailand in order to better understand this virus. Further studies should be conducted to bolster the development of antiviral agents and a vaccine.
    Archives of Virology 09/2013; DOI:10.1007/s00705-013-1773-9 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Among all hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, subtype 3a is the most common genotype in Thailand. This study investigates the molecular epidemiology and epidemic history of HCV subtype 3a in Thailand. Methods: Three hundred and fifty-six serum samples were collected from HCV-infected Thai patients. The virus was isolated, after which the core and NS5B regions were sequenced. Subsequently, the HCV genotype was classified by phylogenetic analysis based on the core and NS5B regions. Molecular evolution analysis of HCV subtype 3a was estimated using BEAST (Bayesian Evolutionary Analysis by Sampling Trees) v.1.5.4. Results: Based on our phylogenetic analyses, subtype 3a (38.5%) was the most prevalent, followed by 1a (21%), 1b (13.8%), genotype 6 (19.9%) [comprised of subtypes 6e (0.3%), 6f (11%), 6i (1.9%), 6j (1.9%) and 6n (4.8%)] and 3b (5.6%). Our phylogenetic tree indicates the existence of a specific group of HCV subtype 3a strains in the Thai population. Molecular evolutionary analysis dated the most recent common ancestor of the Thai HCV subtype 3a strains as existing approximately 200 ago, and a Bayesian skyline plot showed that this particular strain spread to Thailand during the mid-1970s and early 1980s. This period overlaps with the Vietnam War (1955-1975) and the widespread use of injection stimulants introduced by the US Army during this time. Conclusion: The estimated history of HCV subtype 3a infection in Thailand may help to predict the future burden of HCV-related diseases and facilitate better public health control and surveillance. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    Intervirology 07/2013; 56(5). DOI:10.1159/000351621 · 1.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Human adenovirus (HAdV) can cause a wide spectrum of human diseases worldwide. Methods Using PCR and sequence analysis, we investigated HAdV infection prevalence in the Thai population for four years from January 2009 to December 2012. We collected Nasopharyngeal swab/aspirate (NP) specimens from patients in Bangkok, Khon Kaen, and Nakhon Si Thammarat province and fecal specimens only from Bangkok and Khon Kaen province. Results We observed HAdV infection in 1.04% (82/7,921) of NP samples and in 5.84% (76/1,301) of fecal specimens. HAdV-B3 (32%) and HAdV-C1 (31%) were the genotypes most commonly associated with NP specimens followed by HAdV-C2 (13%) and HAdV-C5 (12%). In fecal specimens, we found that 25% harbored HAdV-F41 followed by HAdV-C1 (18%), HAdV-C2 (16%), and HAdV-B3 (13%). Out of all population subsets, children below the age of 3 years were the most likely to be HAdV positive (63.29%). In addition, HAdV infection occurred throughout the year without a seasonal distribution pattern, although HAdV infection of NP samples peaked from January-April while HAdV infection peaked from January to March and then again from May to July in fecal samples. Conclusions This study has for the first time reported the HAdV infection rate in Thai NP and fecal specimens from 2009–2012. We observed that HAdV-B3 and HAdV-C1 were commonly found in NP specimens, and that HAdV-F41 was the most prevalence in fecal specimens in Thailand during the study period.
    Virology Journal 06/2013; 10(1):193. DOI:10.1186/1743-422X-10-193 · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hepatitis B vaccine has been available worldwide since the mid-1980s. This vaccine was evaluated in a clinical trial in Thailand, conducted on subjects born to hepatitis B surface antigen positive and hepatitis B e-antigen positive mothers and vaccinated according to a 4-dose schedule at 0, 1, 2 and 12 mo of age and a single dose of hepatitis B immunoglobulin concomitantly at birth. All enrolled subjects seroconverted and were followed for 20 y to assess the persistence of antibody to the hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) (NCT00240539). At year 20, 64% of subjects had anti-HBs antibody concentrations ≥ 10 milli-international units per milli liter (mIU/ml) and 92% of subjects had detectable levels (≥ 3.3 mIU/ml) of anti-HBs antibodies. At year 20, subjects with anti-HBs antibody titer < 100 mIU/ml were offered an additional dose of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine to assess immune memory (NCT00657657). Anamnestic response to the challenge dose was observed in 96.6% of subjects with an 82-fold (13.2 to 1082.4 mIU/ml) increase in anti-HBs antibody geometric mean concentrations. This study confirms the long-term immunogenicity of the 4r-dose regimen of the HBV vaccine eliciting long-term persistence of antibodies and immune memory against hepatitis B for up to at least 20 y after vaccination.
    Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics 05/2013; 9(8). DOI:10.4161/hv.24844 · 3.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In Thailand, hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is usually caused by enterovirus 71 or coxsackievirus A16. To determine the cause of a large outbreak of HFMD in Thailand during June-August 2012, we examined patient specimens. Coxsackievirus A6 was the causative agent. To improve prevention and control, causes of HFMD should be monitored.
    Emerging Infectious Diseases 04/2013; 19(4):641-3. DOI:10.3201/eid1904.121666 · 7.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The risk of cervical cancer development in women infected with HPV varies in relation to the individual host's genetic makeup. Many studies on polymorphisms as genetic factors have been aimed at analyzing associations with cervical cancer. In this study, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3 genes were investigated in relation to cervical cancer progression in HPV16 infected women with lesions. Two thousand cervical specimens were typed by PCR sequencing methods for TP53 (rs1042522), p16 (rs11515 and rs3088440) and NQO1 (rs1800566). Ninety two HPV16 positive cases and thirty two normal cases were randomly selected. Analysis of TP53 (rs1042522) showed a significantly higher frequency in cancer samples (OR=1.22, 95%CI=1.004-1.481, p-value=0.016) while differences in frequency were not significant within each group (p-value=0.070). The genotype distributions of p16 (rs11515 and rs3088440) and NQO1 (rs1800566) did not show any significantly higher frequency in cancer samples (p-value=0.106, 0.675 and 0.132, respectively) or within each group (p-value=0.347, 0.939 and 0.111, respectively). The results indicated that the polymorphism in TP53 (rs1042522) might be associated with risk of cervical cancer development in HPV16 infected women. Further studies of possible mechanisms of influence on cervical cancer development would be useful to manage HPV infected patients.
    Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention: APJCP 01/2013; 14(1):341-346. DOI:10.7314/APJCP.2013.14.1.341 · 1.50 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
441.53 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1991–2015
    • Chulalongkorn University
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Faculty of Medicine
      • • Faculty of Veterinary Science
      • • Department of Biochemistry
      Krung Thep, Bangkok, Thailand
  • 2005–2012
    • King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital
      Krung Thep, Bangkok, Thailand
  • 2006–2011
    • Bangkok University
      Krung Thep, Bangkok, Thailand
  • 2010
    • Khon Kaen Hospital
      Kawn Ken, Khon Kaen, Thailand
  • 2006–2009
    • Srinakharinwirot University
      • Department of Microbiology
      Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand
  • 2008
    • Phramongkutklao Hostpital
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand
  • 2007
    • Department of Livestock Development
      • Department of Livestock Development
      Krung Thep, Bangkok, Thailand
  • 1998–2002
    • Hat Yai Hospital
      Ban Haad Yai, Songkhla, Thailand
  • 1999
    • Ramathibodi Hospital
      Krung Thep, Bangkok, Thailand
  • 1995
    • Maharat Nakhon Ratchasima Hospital
      Khorat, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand