J Bolt-de Vries

Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (34)129.67 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Although anti-EGFR therapy has established efficacy in metastatic colorectal cancer, only 10-20% of unselected patients respond. This is partly due to KRAS and BRAF mutations, which are currently assessed in the primary tumor. To improve patient selection, assessing mutation status in circulating tumor cells (CTCs), which possibly better represent metastases than the primary tumor, could be advantageous. We investigated the feasibility of KRAS and BRAF mutation detection in colorectal CTCs by comparing three sensitive methods and compared mutation status in matching primary tumor, liver metastasis and CTCs. CTCs were isolated from blood drawn from 49 patients before liver resection using CellSearch™. DNA and RNA was isolated from primary tumors, metastases and CTCs. Mutations were assessed by co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature (COLD)-PCR (Transgenomic™), real-time PCR (EntroGen™), and nested Allele-Specific Blocker (ASB-)PCR and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. In 43 of the 49 patients, tissue RNA and DNA was of sufficient quantity and quality. In these 43 patients, discordance between primary and metastatic tumor was 23% for KRAS and 7% for BRAF mutations. RNA and DNA from CTCs was available from 42 of the 43 patients, in which ASB-PCR was able to detect the most mutations. Inconclusive results in patients with low CTC counts limited the interpretation of discrepancies between tissue and CTCs. Determination of KRAS and BRAF mutations in CTCs is challenging but feasible. Of the tested methods, nested ASB-PCR, enabling detection of KRAS and BRAF mutations in patients with as little as two CTCs, seems to be superior. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    International Journal of Cancer 12/2012; · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be enumerated using CellSearch, but not all breast cancer subtypes, specifically those with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) characteristics, sufficiently express the enrichment (EpCAM) and selection (CK8/18/19) markers used in this method. While CD146 can detect EpCAM-negative CTCs, we here evaluated the value of various cytokeratins and CD49f to detect CK8/18/19-negative CTCs. The tested cytokeratins provided no substantial benefit, but adding CD49f to CK8/18/19 as a selection marker resulted in improved recovery of normal-like cell lines. Combined staining of CK8/18/19 and CD49f after CD146/EpCAM enrichment is likely to further improve CTC detection in breast cancer.
    Cancer letters 12/2011; 319(1):49-55. · 4.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTC) holds great promise. Unfortunately, routinely isolated CTC fractions currently still contain contaminating leukocytes, which makes CTC-specific molecular characterization extremely challenging. In this study, we determined mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression of potentially CTC-specific genes that are considered to be clinically relevant in breast cancer. CTCs were isolated with the epithelial cell adhesion molecule-based CellSearch Profile Kit. Selected genes were measured by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR in CTCs of 50 metastatic breast cancer patients collected before starting first-line systemic therapy in blood from 53 healthy blood donors (HBD) and in primary tumors of 8 of the patients. The molecular profiles were associated with CTC counts and clinical parameters and compared with the profiles generated from the corresponding primary tumors. We identified 55 mRNAs and 10 miRNAs more abundantly expressed in samples from 32 patients with at least 5 CTCs in 7.5 mL of blood compared with samples from 9 patients without detectable CTCs and HBDs. Clustering analysis resulted in 4 different patient clusters characterized by 5 distinct gene clusters. Twice the number of patients from cluster 2 to 4 had developed both visceral and nonvisceral metastases. Comparing transcript levels in CTCs with those measured in corresponding primary tumors showed clinically relevant discrepancies in estrogen receptor and HER2 levels. Our study shows that molecular profiling of low numbers of CTCs in a high background of leukocytes is feasible and shows promise for further studies on the clinical relevance of molecular characterization of CTCs.
    Clinical Cancer Research 06/2011; 17(11):3600-18. · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Most assays to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) rely on EpCAM expression on tumor cells. Recently, our group reported that in contrast to other molecular breast cancer subtypes, "normal-like" cell lines lack EpCAM expression and are thus missed when CTCs are captured with EpCAM-based technology [J Natl Cancer Inst 101(1):61-66, 2009]. Here, the use of CD146 is introduced to detect EpCAM-negative CTCs, thereby improving CTC detection. CD146 and EpCAM expression were assessed in our panel of 41 breast cancer cell lines. Cells from 14 cell lines, 9 of which normal-like, were spiked into healthy donor blood. Using CellSearch technology, 7.5 ml whole blood was enriched for CTCs by adding ferrofluids loaded with antibodies against EpCAM and/or CD146 followed by staining for Cytokeratin and DAPI. Hematopoietic cells and circulating endothelial cells (CECs) were counterstained with CD45 and CD34, respectively. A similar approach was applied for blood samples of 20 advanced breast cancer patients. Eight of 9 normal-like breast cancer cell lines lacked EpCAM expression but did express CD146. Five of these 8 could be adequately recovered by anti-CD146 ferrofluids. Of 20 advanced breast cancer patients whose CTCs were enumerated with anti-EpCAM and anti-CD146 ferrofluids, 9 had CD146+ CTCs. Cells from breast cancer cell lines that lack EpCAM expression frequently express CD146 and can be recovered by anti-CD146 ferrofluids. CD146+ CTCs are present in the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients with advanced disease. Combined use of anti-CD146 and anti-EpCAM is likely to improve CTC detection in breast cancer patients.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 04/2010; 127(1):33-41. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in whole blood from metastatic cancer patients by the CellSearch CTC Test (Veridex LLC, Warren, NJ, USA) has been shown to have clinical relevance. In addition to enumeration, there is great interest in molecular characterization of these CTCs. We aimed to establish a robust method to perform mRNA expression analysis of multiple genes by a real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR on small numbers of CTCs enriched from whole blood by the CellSearch system. Despite the 4 log depletion of leukocytes after CellSearch enrichment, the CTC-enriched fractions still contained leukocytes, in particular B-lymphocytes, which severely interfered with our CTC-specific gene expression profiling. After extensive washing and leukocyte-specific depletion by anti-CD45 coated magnetic beads prior to CellSearch enrichment, the number of leukocytes present in the enriched fraction was still high (range 60-929). However, by using a set of genes with no or minor expression by leukocytes, we succeeded to perform quantitative gene expression profiling specific for as little as one breast cancer CTC present in a CTC-enriched environment typically containing over 800 contaminating leukocytes. Our method allows molecular characterization specific for as little as one CTC, and can be used to expand the understanding of the biology of metastasis and, potentially, to improve patient management.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 01/2009; 118(3):455-68. · 4.47 Impact Factor
  • Ejc Supplements - EJC SUPPL. 01/2009; 7(2):262-262.
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we evaluated if PITX2 DNA methylation is a marker for disease recurrence in lymph node-negative (LNN), steroid hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer patients. In addition, we studied the association between PITX2 DNA methylation and PITX2 gene expression. PITX2 DNA-methylation was measured in tumor tissue from 412 LNN/HR+ breast cancer patients who had not received any adjuvant systemic treatment. In addition, PITX2 DNA-methylation and mRNA expression was evaluated in 32 breast cancer cell lines. In univariate Cox regression analysis, DNA-methylation of PITX2 as a continuous variable was associated with early distant metastasis (HR = 1.71; P < 0.01) and poor overall survival (HR = 1.71; P < 0.01). In multivariate analysis together with the established prognostic factors age, tumor size and tumor grade, and steroid hormone receptor levels, both associations retained their significance (for MFS, HR = 1.74; P < 0.01; for OS, HR = 1.46; P = 0.02). In the breast cancer cell lines, PITX2 DNA methylation was inversely association with PITX2A and PITX2B mRNA expression (P < 0.01). Hypermethylation of PITX2 is, in cell lines, negatively associated with PITX2 mRNA expression and, in clinical specimens, positively associated with breast cancer disease progression.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 11/2007; 111(3):429-37. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To understand the biological basis of resistance to endocrine therapy is of utmost importance in patients with steroid hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Not only will this allow us prediction of therapy success, it may also lead to novel therapies for patients resistant to current endocrine therapy. DNA methylation in the promoter regions of genes is a prominent epigenetic gene silencing mechanism that contributes to breast cancer biology. In the current study, we investigated whether promoter DNA methylation could be associated with resistance to endocrine therapy in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Using a microarray-based technology, the promoter DNA methylation status of 117 candidate genes was studied in a cohort of 200 steroid hormone receptor-positive tumors of patients who received the antiestrogen tamoxifen as first-line treatment for recurrent breast cancer. Of the genes analyzed, the promoter DNA methylation status of 10 genes was significantly associated with clinical outcome of tamoxifen therapy. The association of the promoter hypermethylation of the strongest marker, phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT1) with favorable clinical outcome was confirmed by an independent quantitative DNA methylation detection method. Furthermore, the extent of DNA methylation of PSAT1 was inversely associated with its expression at the mRNA level. Finally, also at the mRNA level, PSAT1 was a predictor of tamoxifen therapy response. Concluding, our work indicates that promoter hypermethylation and mRNA expression of PSAT1 are indicators of response to tamoxifen-based endocrine therapy in steroid hormone receptor-positive patients with recurrent breast cancer.
    Cancer Research 06/2005; 65(10):4101-17. · 8.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is ample information on the clinical role of biologic factors in female breast cancer: urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), its receptor uPAR, its inhibitors PAI-1 and PAI-2, cathepsin D and pS2-protein. However such reports are missing or very rare for male breast cancer. We determined the cytosolic levels of oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), cathepsin D, pS2-protein, uPA, uPAR, PAI-1 and PAI-2 of the primary tumour tissues from 40 male breast cancer patients. The tumour levels were compared with those of 180 matched females and 4114 historic females with breast cancer. In male breast tumours the level of PgR was higher, those of uPA, PAI-1, PAI-2 and cathepsin D lower. The tumour level of ER in men was similar to those in the matched and postmenopausal women, but much higher than those in the historic women. Male breast cancer seems to be biologically different from female breast cancer. Correlation of the eight cell biologic factors with disease outcome showed that PAI-1 (p = 0.03) was the only independent predictive factor for poor prognosis in male breast cancer.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 09/2001; 68(3):249-60. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate whether cathepsin D, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), or clinical factors can predict which patients are at risk for developing distant metastases after local recurrence (LR). Of 1,630 patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy of the breast between 1980 and 1992, LR developed in 171 as a first event. From the available primary tumor tissues, we determined the cytosolic levels of cathepsin D, uPA and PAI-1. In patients with LR, a short (< or = 2 years) disease-free interval (DFI) and skin involvement of LR were associated with poor postrelapse distant metastasis-free survival (PR-DMFS, P = .001, both) and postrelapse overall survival (PR-OS; P < .0001 and P < .0002, respectively). The primary tumor levels of uPA and PAI-1 were elevated for patients with a short DFI (P < .01), but such a relation was not observed for patients with skin involvement. In univariate analyses, high levels of uPA and PAI-1 in the primary tumor were associated with poor PR-OS (P = .038 and P = .040, respectively) but not PR-DMFS. In Cox multivariate analyses for PR-DMFS and PR-OS, only a short DFI and skin involvement of the LR were independently associated with a poor clinical outcome. In patients treated with breast-conserving therapy who had LR as a first event, a short DFI and skin involvement were strong indicators for poor PR-DMFS and PR-OS. The proteases studied did not contribute significantly to the final multivariate model.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 05/1999; 17(5):1449-57. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prognostic value of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) measured in samples derived from 865 patients with primary breast cancer using a recently developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was evaluated. Since the assay could easily be adapted to the assessment of the complex of tPA with its type-1 inhibitor (PAI-1), it was investigated whether the tPA:PAI-1 complex also provides prognostic information. To this end, cytosolic extracts and corresponding detergent extracts of 100,000 g pellets obtained after ultracentrifugation when preparing the cytosolic fractions for routine steroid hormone receptor determination were assayed. Statistically significant correlations were found between the cytosolic levels and those determined in the pellet extracts (Spearman correlation coefficient r(s) = 0.75, P < 0.001 for tPA and r = 0.50, P < 0.001 for tPA:PAI-1 complex). In both Cox univariate and multivariate analysis elevated levels of (total) tPA determined in the pellet extracts, but not in cytosols, were associated with prolonged relapse-free (RFS) and overall survival (OS). In contrast, high levels of the tPA:PAI-1 complex measured in cytosols, but not in the pellet extracts, were associated with a poor RFS and OS. The prognostic information provided by the cytosolic tPA:PAI-1 complex was comparable to that provided by cytosolic (total) PAI-1. Furthermore, the estimated levels of free, uncomplexed tPA and PAI-1, in cytosols and in pellet extracts, were related to patient prognosis in a similar way as the (total) levels of tPA and PAI-1 respectively. Determination of specific forms of components of the plasminogen activation system, i.e. tPA:PAI-1 complex and free, uncomplexed tPA and/or PAI-1, may be considered a useful adjunct to the analyses of the separate components (tPA and/or PAI-1) and provide valuable additional prognostic information with respect to survival of breast cancer patients.
    British Journal of Cancer 04/1999; 80(1-2):286-94. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is controversy regarding the prognostic value of cathepsin-D in primary breast cancer. An increased level of cathepsin-D in tumour extracts has been found to be associated with a poor relapse-free and overall survival. Studies performed with immunohistochemistry or Western blotting have produced diverse results. We have analysed 2810 cytosolic extracts obtained from human primary breast tumours for cathepsin-D expression, and have correlated their levels with prognosis. The median follow-up of the patients still alive was 88 months. Patients with high cathepsin-D levels had a significantly worse relapse-free and overall survival, also in multivariate analysis (P < 0.0001). Adjuvant therapy which was associated with an improved prognosis in node-positive patients in univariate analysis, also significantly added to the multivariate models for relapse-free and overall survival. There were no statistically significant interactions between the levels of cathepsin-D and any of the classical prognostic factors in analysis for relapse-free survival, suggesting that the prognostic value of cathepsin-D is not different in the various subgroups of patients. Indeed, multivariate analyses in subgroups of node-negative and -positive patients, pre- and post-menopausal patients, and their combinations, showed that tumours with high cathepsin-D values had a significantly poor relapse-free survival, with relative hazard rates ranging from 1.3 to 1.5, compared with tumours with low cathepsin-D levels. The results presented here on 2810 patients confirm that high cytosolic cathepsin-D values are associated with poor prognosis in human primary breast cancer.
    British Journal of Cancer 01/1999; 79(2):300-7. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Adult rats were treated with ethane dimethane sulphonate (EDS) to eliminate the Leydig cells. This treatment resulted in very low levels of testosterone in the blood and in the testis. Furthermore, histological evaluation of spermatogenesis showed no marked differences between control and EDS-treated animals. In the ventral prostate, 5 days after EDS-treatment, a 4.0 +/- 0.3-fold up-regulation of androgen receptor (AR) mRNA was observed, together with a 2.2 +/- 0.2-fold increase in actin mRNA. In the epididymis, a 2.0 +/- 0.5-fold increase in AR mRNA level was observed, without a change in actin mRNA level. In the testes of EDS-treated rats, the AR mRNA level was not changed (1.02 +/- 0.17-fold of controls), and there was also no change in actin mRNA level at 5 days after EDS-treatment. These results indicate that AR mRNA expression in the ventral prostate and epididymis is regulated differentially by testosterone when compared to regulation in the testis. Testicular androgen binding sites were assayed by Scatchard analysis of the binding of 3H-R1881 to a nuclear fraction, that was isolated by a method which involved the use of liquid nitrogen and high sucrose buffer. The number of specific binding sites per testis in EDS-treated rats with testosterone-implants, remained unaltered compared to control rats (9.1 +/- 1.4 pmol/testis). In these rats, 20% of the normal testicular testosterone level was sufficient to maintain the androgen receptor in a tight nuclear binding (transformed) form. In testes from EDS-treated rats without testosterone-implants, the AR did not fractionate into the nuclear fraction; however, the total testicular AR content in these animals was close to control levels, as measured by nuclear 3H-R1881 binding after receptor transformation through injection of a high dose of testosterone (10 mg) 2 h before killing the rats (testosterone pulse). In the different experimental groups, FSH was not required to maintain the total testicular AR content (ligand binding). Immunoprecipitation and Western blotting of the testicular AR using specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies indicated that the total testicular amount of immunodetectable AR protein in long-term testosterone deprived rats was very low when compared to that in control rats or rats with testosterone-implants. This is in disagreement with results obtained in the ligand binding assay, and may point to a structural modification of the AR in the testis that possibly occurs in the prolonged absence of androgens.
    International Journal of Andrology 05/1992; 15(2):182-98. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Testosterone, 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone and cyproterone acetate (CPA) were estimated in samples of prostate tissue, obtained from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients who were or were not pretreated with CPA. Furthermore, these steroids were estimated in various fractions of the BPH tissue, and the number of nuclear androgen-receptor sites was determined. CPA-treatment caused a 4-fold, significant suppression of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone levels in total prostate tissue and its subfractions, without affecting testosterone levels or the androgen-receptor contents of the nuclear extracts. Nuclear concentrations of CPA were twice as high as those of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. It is concluded that effects of CPA may have been caused through a combination of the following mechanisms: (1) suppression of peripheral androgen levels; (2) competition with androgens for (nuclear) androgen-receptors; and (3) suppression of prostatic 5 alpha-reductase.
    The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 04/1992; 42(1):49-55. · 3.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Adult rats were treated with ethane dimethane sulphonate (EDS), an agent that destroys Leydig cells. Within 5 days after EDS treatment, the levels of testosterone (T) in the circulation and in the testis were decreased to very low values, which makes it possible to manipulate the testicular T concentration through administration of exogenous T. Spermatogenesis was not markedly affected within 5 days after EDS treatment, also not in the absence of T administration. In testes of EDS-treated rats, the androgen receptor mRNA (ARmRNA) level remained unaltered for 5 days. In ventral prostate, however, this treatment caused a pronounced upregulation of the level of ARmRNA, which could be counteracted by implantation of silastic T implants immediately after EDS treatment. In EDS-treated rats carrying a T implant and in untreated rats, the same number of specific [3H]R1881 binding sites was observed using a total testis nuclear fraction (Scatchard analysis). In testes from EDS-treated rats without T implants, androgen receptors (AR) did not fractionate into the nuclear fraction; however, the total testicular AR content in these animals (measured by nuclear [3H]R1881 binding after receptor transformation through injection of a high dose of T, 2 h before killing the rats) remained unaltered. Immunoprecipitation and Western blotting using anti N-terminal antibodies seemed to indicate that the total testicular amount of AR protein in the EDS-treated rats was very low as compared to that in EDS-treated rats carrying T implants and in untreated rats. Even after receptor retransformation (by injection of a high dose of T) the receptors were not quantitatively detected by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. This may point to a structural modification of the AR that occurs in the prolonged absence of androgens.
    The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 02/1991; 40(1-3):343-7. · 3.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: LNCaP tumor cells, derived from a metastatic lesion of a human prostatic carcinoma, are androgen-sensitive in cell culture. Although increase in growth rate is observed with low doses of progestagens or estradiol, these cells contain exclusively androgen receptors. In the present study the binding affinity of different ligands for both non-DNA- and DNA-binding (transformed) forms of the androgen receptor were analyzed. The cytosolic (non-transformed) form of the receptor displayed an abnormal high affinity for progestagens and estradiol when compared with the cytosolic androgen receptor from other sources. Subsequently the non-transformed forms of the androgen receptor obtained from LNCaP cell nuclei was studied. A high binding affinity was found not only for dihydrotestosterone, but also for progesterone and the synthetic progestagen R5020 (relative binding affinity 42% and 10% of dihydrotestosterone). The binding characteristics of the transformed androgen receptor were examined in intact cells at 37 degrees C. LNCaP cells were compared in this respect with COS cells containing the cloned human androgen receptor, normal human skin fibroblasts and PC3 (prostate) and NHIK (cervix) human tumor cell lines. The affinity of the transformed androgen receptors for the progestagen R5020 in LNCaP cells was significantly higher than in the other cell systems, although the differences were less pronounced than for the non-transformed receptor form. In conclusion: the LNCaP tumor cells contain an androgen receptor with an abnormal binding site. This might be due to a mutation and/or a post-transcriptional effect.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 05/1990; 1052(1):187-94. · 4.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Androgen receptor heterogeneity and phosphorylation were studied in the human LNCaP cell line. Fluorography after photoaffinity labeling as well as immunoblotting with a specific polyclonal antibody revealed that the human androgen receptor migrated as a closely spaced 110 kD doublet on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. A time-dependent change in the ratio between the two isoforms was not observed after R1881 treatment of intact cells. In nuclear extracts of LNCaP cells that were incubated with [32P]orthophosphate in the presence of 10 nM R1881, a 110 kD phosphorylated protein was demonstrated after immunopurification using a monoclonal antibody against the human androgen receptor. Only a very small amount of this phosphoprotein was detected in the nuclear fraction from cells not treated with R1881. These results indicate that the human androgen receptor in LNCaP cells can be phosphorylated.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 02/1990; 166(1):193-200. · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Androgen receptor heterogeneity and phosphorylation were studied in the human LNCaP cell line. Fluorography after photoafffinity labeling as well as immunoblotting with a specific polyclonal antibody revealed that the human androgen receptor migrated as a closely spaced 110 kD doublet on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. A time-dependent change in the ratio between the two isoforms was not observed after R1881 treatment of intact cells. In nuclear extracts of LNCaP cells that were incubated with [32P]orthophosphate in the presence of 10 nM R1881, a 110 kD phosphorylated protein was demonstrated after immunopurification using a monoclonal antibody against the human androgen receptor. Only a very small amount of this phosphoprotein was detected in the nuclear fraction from cells not treated with R1881. These results indicate that the human androgen receptor in LNCaP cells can be phosphorylated.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 01/1990; 166(1):193-200. · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The androgen receptor in human prostate carcinoma cells (LNCaP) has been studied after in situ photolabeling with [3H]R1881. Sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of whole cell extracts revealed the presence of two specifically labeled proteins of 110 kDa and 43 kDa. Both photolabeled proteins were stable in cell homogenates and generated different chymotryptic maps, suggesting that the two proteins were different. From ligand binding specificity studies could be concluded that the 110 kDa protein represents the androgen receptor. The 43 kDa protein showed binding specificity only for R1881. Both photolabeled proteins were recovered from LNCaP nuclei, but the 43 kDa protein showed a relatively higher affinity for nuclei than the 110 kDa protein. The function of this protein is unknown. It is concluded that the human androgen receptor is a protein with a molecular mass of 110 kDa.
    Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology 06/1989; 63(1-2):39-44. · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The content of nuclear androgen receptors (ARn) in prostatic carcinoma biopsies is not predictive for the duration of response of the tumor to endocrine therapy. Recently pre-treatment plasma testosterone has been suggested to be predictive in this respect. Therefore, pre-treatment plasma testosterone (T) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels were studied in 31 patients aged 72 +/- 10 years (range: 45-87) with stage D2 carcinoma of the prostate treated by orchiectomy. In 26 of these patients, the ARn level of the carcinoma was also known (61 +/- 41 fmol/mg protein; range 0-169). Plasma T levels (mean: 13.7 +/- 6.1 nmol/l) varied widely (range: 2.4-25.4), as did plasma SHBG (32.5 +/- 19.3 nmol/l; range 4.4-78.8), and time to progression (TTP; 14.6 +/- 11.2 months; range 1-48). Plasma T was found to be correlated to age (Rs = 0.537; P less than 0.01) and TTP (Rs = 0.4495; P less than 0.02). Tissue ARn and plasma SHBG did not correlate to any of the parameters studied.
    Urological Research 02/1989; 17(2):99-102. · 1.59 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

647 Citations
129.67 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001–2012
    • Erasmus MC
      • Department of Internal Oncology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2011
    • Netherlands Cancer Institute
      • Department of Medical Oncology
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 1988–1989
    • Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam
      • • Department of Biochemistry
      • • Department of Urology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands