Derese Getnet

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States

Are you Derese Getnet?

Claim your profile

Publications (22)149.35 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To optimize the combination of ionizing radiation and cellular immunotherapy using a preclinical autochthonous model of prostate cancer. Transgenic mice expressing a model antigen under a prostate-specific promoter were treated using a platform that integrates cone-beam CT imaging with 3-dimensional conformal therapy. Using this technology we investigated the immunologic and therapeutic effects of combining ionizing radiation with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting cellular immunotherapy for prostate cancer in mice bearing autochthonous prostate tumors. The combination of ionizing radiation and immunotherapy resulted in a significant decrease in pathologic tumor grade and gross tumor bulk that was not evident with either single-modality therapy. Furthermore, combinatorial therapy resulted in improved overall survival in a preventive metastasis model and in the setting of established micrometastases. Mechanistically, combined therapy resulted in an increase of the ratio of effector-to-regulatory T cells for both CD4 and CD8 tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Our preclinical model establishes a potential role for the use of combined radiation-immunotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer, which warrants further exploration in a clinical setting.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 09/2013; · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The FDA recently approved an anti-CTLA-4 antibody (Iplimumab) for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. This decision was based on Phase III results, which demonstrate that blocking this immune checkpoint provides a survival advantage in patients with advanced disease. As a single agent, ipilimumab is also being clinically evaluated in advanced (metastatic, castrate-resistant) prostate cancer and two randomized, placebo-controlled Phase III studies have recently completed accrual. METHODS: We used a well-described genetically engineered mouse (GEM), autochronous prostate cancer model (Pro-TRAMP) to explore the relative sequencing and dosing of anti-CTLA-4 antibody when combined with a cell-based, GM-CSF-secreting vaccine (GVAX). RESULTS: Our results show that combined treatment results in a dramatic increase in effector CD8 T cells in the prostate gland, and enhanced tumor-antigen directed lytic function. These effects are maximized when CTLA-4 blockade is applied after, but not before, vaccination. Additional experiments, using models of metastatic disease, show that incorporation of low-dose cyclophosphamide into this combined treatment regimen results in an additional pre-clinical benefit. CONCLUSIONS: Together these studies define a combination regimen using anti-CTLA-4 / GVAX immunotherapy and low-dose chemotherapy for potential translation to a clinical trial setting.
    Journal of Translational Medicine 04/2013; 11(1):89. · 3.46 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Tissue microarrays have become a valuable tool for high-throughput analysis using immunohistochemical labeling. However, the large majority of biochemical studies are carried out in cell lines to further characterize candidate biomarkers or therapeutic targets with subsequent studies in animals or using primary tissues. Thus, cell line-based microarrays could be a useful screening tool in some situations. Here, we constructed a cell microarray (CMA) containing a panel of 40 pancreatic cancer cell lines available from American Type Culture Collection in addition to those locally available at Johns Hopkins. As proof of principle, we performed immunocytochemical labeling of an epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM), a molecule generally expressed in the epithelium, on this pancreatic cancer CMA. In addition, selected molecules that have been previously shown to be differentially expressed in pancreatic cancer in the literature were validated. For example, we observed strong labeling of CA19-9 antigen, a prognostic and predictive marker for pancreatic cancer. We also carried out a bioinformatics analysis of a literature curated catalog of pancreatic cancer biomarkers developed previously by our group and identified two candidate biomarkers, HLA class I and transmembrane protease, serine 4 (TMPRSS4), and examined their expression in the cell lines represented on the pancreatic cancer CMAs. Our results demonstrate the utility of CMAs as a useful resource for rapid screening of molecules of interest and suggest that CMAs can become a universal standard platform in cancer research.
    Journal of Proteome Research 09/2012; · 5.06 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dicer is a ribonuclease whose major role is to generate mature microRNAs, although additional functions have been proposed. Deletion of Dicer leads to embryonic lethality in mice. To study the role of Dicer in adults, we generated mice in which administration of tamoxifen induces deletion of Dicer. Surprisingly, disruption of Dicer in adult mice induced lipid accumulation in the small intestine. To dissect the underlying mechanisms, we carried out miRNA, mRNA, and proteomic profiling of the small intestine. The proteomic analysis was done using mice metabolically labeled with heavy lysine (SILAC mice) for an in vivo readout. We identified 646 proteins, of which 80 were up-regulated >2-fold and 75 were down-regulated. Consistent with the accumulation of lipids, Dicer disruption caused a marked decrease of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, long-chain fatty acyl-CoA ligase 5, fatty acid binding protein, and very-long-chain fatty acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, among others. We validated these results using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) experiments by targeting proteotypic peptides. Our data reveal a previously unappreciated role of Dicer in lipid metabolism. These studies demonstrate that a systems biology approach by integrating mouse models, metabolic labeling, gene expression profiling, and quantitative proteomics can be a powerful tool for understanding complex biological systems.
    Journal of Proteome Research 02/2012; 11(4):2193-205. · 5.06 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a cytokine that plays diverse roles in the regulation of immune responses. TSLP requires a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of IL-7 receptor α subunit and its unique TSLP receptor (gene symbol CRLF2) to transmit signals in cells. Abnormal TSLP signaling (e.g. overexpression of TSLP or its unique receptor TSLPR) contributes to the development of a number of diseases including asthma and leukemia. However, a detailed understanding of the signaling pathways activated by TSLP remains elusive. In this study, we performed a global quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of the TSLP signaling network using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture. By employing titanium dioxide in addition to antiphosphotyrosine antibodies as enrichment methods, we identified 4164 phosphopeptides on 1670 phosphoproteins. Using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture-based quantitation, we determined that the phosphorylation status of 226 proteins was modulated by TSLP stimulation. Our analysis identified activation of several members of the Src and Tec families of kinases including Btk, Lyn, and Tec by TSLP for the first time. In addition, we report TSLP-induced phosphorylation of protein phosphatases such as Ptpn6 (SHP-1) and Ptpn11 (Shp2), which has also not been reported previously. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that Shp2 binds to the adapter protein Gab2 in a TSLP-dependent manner. This is the first demonstration of an inducible protein complex in TSLP signaling. A kinase inhibitor screen revealed that pharmacological inhibition of PI-3 kinase, Jak family kinases, Src family kinases or Btk suppressed TSLP-dependent cellular proliferation making them candidate therapeutic targets in diseases resulting from aberrant TSLP signaling. Our study is the first phosphoproteomic analysis of the TSLP signaling pathway that greatly expands our understanding of TSLP signaling and provides novel therapeutic targets for TSLP/TSLPR-associated diseases in humans.
    Molecular &amp Cellular Proteomics 02/2012; 11(6):M112.017764. · 7.25 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Helios, an Ikaros family transcription factor, is preferentially expressed at the mRNA and protein level in regulatory T cells. Helios expression previously appeared to be restricted to thymic-derived Treg. Consistent with recent data, we show here that Helios expression is inducible in vitro under certain conditions. To understand phenotypic and functional differences between Helios(+) and Helios(-) Treg, we profiled cell-surface markers of FoxP3(+) Treg using unmanipulated splenocytes. We found that CD103 and GITR are expressed at high levels on a subset of Helios(+) Treg and that a Helios(+) Treg population could be significantly enriched by FACS sorting using these two markers. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis revealed increased TGF-β message in Helios(+) Treg, consistent with the possibility that this population possesses enhanced regulatory potential. In tumor-bearing mice, we found that Helios(+) Treg were relatively over-represented in the tumor-mass, and BrdU studies showed that, in vivo, Helios(+) Treg proliferated more than Helios(-) Treg. We hypothesized that Helios-enriched Treg might exert increased suppressive effects. Using in vitro suppression assays, we show that Treg function correlates with the absolute number of Helios(+) cells in culture. Taken together, these data show that Helios(+) Treg represent a functional subset with associated CD103 and GITR expression.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(3):e34547. · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Anopheles gambiae is a major mosquito vector responsible for malaria transmission, whose genome sequence was reported in 2002. Genome annotation is a continuing effort, and many of the approximately 13,000 genes listed in VectorBase for Anopheles gambiae are predictions that have still not been validated by any other method. To identify protein-coding genes of An. gambiae based on its genomic sequence, we carried out a deep proteomic analysis using high-resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry for both precursor and fragment ions. Based on peptide evidence, we were able to support or correct more than 6000 gene annotations including 80 novel gene structures and about 500 translational start sites. An additional validation by RT-PCR and cDNA sequencing was successfully performed for 105 selected genes. Our proteogenomic analysis led to the identification of 2682 genome search-specific peptides. Numerous cases of encoded proteins were documented in regions annotated as intergenic, introns, or untranslated regions. Using a database created to contain potential splice sites, we also identified 35 novel splice junctions. This is a first report to annotate the An. gambiae genome using high-accuracy mass spectrometry data as a complementary technology for genome annotation.
    Genome Research 07/2011; 21(11):1872-81. · 14.40 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Multinucleated cells are relatively resistant to classic apoptosis, and the factors initiating cell death and damage in myositis are not well defined. We hypothesized that nonimmune autophagic cell death may play a role in muscle fiber damage. Recent reports indicate that TRAIL may induce both NF-κB activation and autophagic cell death in other systems. We undertook this study to investigate the role of TRAIL in cell death and pathogenesis in vitro and in vivo, using myositis muscle tissues from humans and mice. Gene expression profiling was performed in myositis patient and control muscle specimens. Immunohistochemistry analysis was performed to confirm the gene array findings. We also analyzed TRAIL-induced cell death (apoptosis and autophagy) and NF-κB activation in vitro in cultured cells. TRAIL was expressed predominantly in myositis muscle fibers, but not in biopsy specimens from normal or other dystrophic-diseased muscle. Autophagy markers were up-regulated in humans with myositis and in mouse models of myositis. TRAIL expression was restricted to regenerating/atrophic areas of muscle fascicles, blood vessels, and infiltrating lymphocytes. TRAIL induced NF-κB activation and IκB degradation in cultured cells that are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis but that undergo autophagic cell death. Our data demonstrate that TRAIL is expressed in myositis muscle and may mediate both activation of NF-κB and autophagic cell death in myositis. Thus, this nonimmune pathway may be an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in myositis.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 07/2011; 63(11):3448-57. · 7.48 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The CD8 T-cell response to prostate and other cancers is often functionally diminished or absent. This may occur via deletion of tumor-specific T cells, through acquisition of an anergic phenotype, or via active suppression mediated by another population of cells. We used a double transgenic model in which mice express CD8 T cells specific for a prostate/prostate cancer antigen to study the response of CD8 T cells to evolving autochronous prostate tumors in TRAMP mice. CD8 T cells were analyzed for functionality by measuring IFN-γ production via flow cytometry and via an in vivo CTL killing assay. In addition, pathological scoring of the prostates of the double transgenic mice was compared to scoring of tumor burden prostates of ProTRAMP mice. Tumor-specific CD8 T cells were not grossly deleted in these animals, but evidenced a clearly non-functional phenotype. Interestingly, full lytic function was rapidly recovered upon removal from tumor-bearing mice. These data indicate a role for continuous antigen exposure in the maintenance of tumor-specific CD8 T-cell tolerance to prostate cancer.
    The Prostate 07/2011; 72(5):514-22. · 3.84 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) is a member of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily that plays a key role in the regulation of differentiation, activation and survival of osteoclasts and also in tumor cell migration and bone metastasis. Osteoclast activation induced by RANKL regulates hematopoietic stem cell mobilization as part of homeostasis and host defense mechanisms thereby linking regulation of hematopoiesis with bone remodeling. Binding of RANKL to its receptor, Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (RANK) activates molecules such as NF-kappa B, mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and phosphatidyl 3-kinase (PI3K). Although the molecular and cellular roles of these molecules have been reported previously, a systematic cataloging of the molecular events induced by RANKL/RANK interaction has not been attempted. Here, we present a comprehensive reaction map of the RANKL/RANK-signaling pathway based on an extensive manual curation of the published literature. We hope that the curated RANKL/RANK-signaling pathway model would enable new biomedical discoveries, which can provide novel insights into disease processes and development of novel therapeutic interventions.
    Database The Journal of Biological Databases and Curation 01/2011; 2011:bar021. · 4.20 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Relative upregulation of the Ikaros family transcription factor Helios in natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) has been reported by several groups. However, a role for Helios in regulatory T cells has not yet been described. Here, we show that Helios is upregulated in CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments indicated that Helios binds to the FoxP3 promoter. These data were further corroborated by experiments showing that knocking-down Helios with siRNA oligonucleotides results in down-regulation of FoxP3. Functionally, we found that suppression of Helios message in CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells significantly attenuates their suppressive function. Taken together, these data suggest that Helios may play an important role in regulatory T cell function and support the concept that Helios may be a novel target to manipulate Treg activity in a clinical setting.
    Molecular Immunology 03/2010; 47(7-8):1595-600. · 2.65 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: IL-17-secreting CD8 T cells (Tc17) have been described in several settings, but little is known regarding their functional characteristics. While Tc1 cells produced IFN-gamma and efficiently killed targets, Tc17 cells lacked lytic function in vitro. Interestingly, the small numbers of IFN-gamma-positive or IL-17/IFN-gamma-double-positive cells generated under Tc17 conditions also lacked lytic activity and expressed a similar pattern of cell surface proteins to IL-17-producing cells. As is the case for Th17 (CD4) cells, STAT3 is important for Tc17 polarization, both in vitro and in vivo. Adoptive transfer of highly purified, Ag-specific IL-17-secreting Tc17 cells into Ag-bearing hosts resulted in near complete conversion to an IFN-gamma-secreting phenotype and substantial pulmonary pathology, demonstrating functional plasticity. Tc17 also accumulated to a greater extent than did Tc1 cells, suggesting that adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells cultured in Tc17 conditions may have therapeutic potential for diseases in which IFN-gamma-producing cells are desired.
    The Journal of Immunology 11/2009; 183(11):7161-8. · 5.52 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain immunological self-tolerance and immune homeostasis by suppressing aberrant or excessive immune responses. The core genetic program of Tregs and their ability to suppress pathologic immune responses depends on the transcription factor Foxp3. Despite progress in understanding mechanisms of Foxp3-dependent gene activation, the molecular mechanism of Foxp3-dependent gene repression remains largely unknown. We identified Eos, a zinc-finger transcription factor of the Ikaros family, as a critical mediator of Foxp3-dependent gene silencing in Tregs. Eos interacts directly with Foxp3 and induces chromatin modifications that result in gene silencing in Tregs. Silencing of Eos in Tregs abrogates their ability to suppress immune responses and endows them with partial effector function, thus demonstrating the critical role that Eos plays in Treg programming.
    Science 09/2009; 325(5944):1142-6. · 31.20 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lymphocyte Activation Gene-3 (LAG-3) is a transmembrane protein that binds MHC class II, enhances regulatory T cell activity, and negatively regulates cellular proliferation, activation, and homeostasis of T cells. Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) also negatively regulates T cell function. LAG-3 and PD-1 are both transiently expressed on CD8 T cells that have been stimulated during acute activation. However, both LAG-3 and PD-1 remain on CD8 T cells at high levels after stimulation within tolerizing environments. Our previous data demonstrated that blockade of either LAG-3 or PD-1 using mAb therapy in combination with vaccination restores the function of tolerized Ag-specific CD8 T cells in models of self and tumor tolerance. It is unclear whether tolerized CD8 T cells coexpress PD-1 and LAG-3 or whether PD-1 and LAG-3 mark functionally distinct populations of CD8 T cells. In this study, we describe three populations of CD8 T cells activated under tolerizing conditions based on LAG-3 and PD-1 staining, each with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics. From a mechanistic perspective, both Ag concentration and proinflammatory signals control the expression of LAG-3 and PD-1 phenotypes on CD8 T cells under activating and tolerizing conditions. These results imply that signaling through the PD-1 and LAG-3 pathways have distinct functional consequences to CD8 T cells under tolerizing conditions and manipulation of both Ag and cytokine signaling can influence CD8 tolerance through LAG-3 and PD-1.
    The Journal of Immunology 07/2009; 182(11):6659-69. · 5.52 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To study the immune response to prostate cancer, we developed an autochthonous animal model based on the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mouse in which spontaneously developing tumors express influenza hemagglutinin as a unique, tumor-associated antigen. Our prior studies in these animals showed immunologic tolerance to hemagglutinin, mirroring the clinical situation in patients with cancer who are generally nonresponsive to their disease. We used this physiologically relevant animal model to assess the immunomodulatory effects of cyclophosphamide when administered in combination with an allogeneic, cell-based granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting cancer immunotherapy. Through adoptive transfer of prostate/prostate cancer-specific CD8 T cells as well as through studies of the endogenous T-cell repertoire, we found that cyclophosphamide induced a marked augmentation of the antitumor immune response. This effect was strongly dependent on both the dose and the timing of cyclophosphamide administration. Mechanistic studies showed that immune augmentation by cyclophosphamide was associated with a transient depletion of regulatory T cells in the tumor draining lymph nodes but not in the peripheral circulation. Interestingly, we also noted effects on dendritic cell phenotype; low-dose cyclophosphamide was associated with increased expression of dendritic cell maturation markers. Taken together, these data clarify the dose, timing, and mechanism of action by which immunomodulatory cyclophosphamide can be translated to a clinical setting in a combinatorial cancer treatment strategy.
    Cancer Research 06/2009; 69(10):4309-18. · 8.65 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Tumors express a wide variety of both mutated and nonmutated Ags. Whether these tumor Ags are broadly recognized as self or foreign by the immune system is currently unclear. Using an autochthonous prostate cancer model in which hemagglutinin (HA) is specifically expressed in the tumor (ProHA x TRAMP mice), as well as an analogous model wherein HA is expressed in normal tissues as a model self-Ag (C3HA(high)), we examined the transcriptional profile of CD4 T cells undergoing Ag-specific division. Consistent with our previous data, transfer of Ag-specific CD4 T cells into C3HA(high) resulted in a functionally inactivated CD4 T cell profile. Conversely, adoptive transfer of an identical CD4 T cell population into ProHA x TRAMP mice resulted in the induction of a regulatory phenotype of the T cell (Treg) both at the transcriptional and functional level. Interestingly, this Treg skewing was a property of even early-stage tumors, suggesting Treg induction as an important tolerance mechanism during tumor development.
    The Journal of Immunology 05/2009; 182(8):4675-85. · 5.52 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cancer immunotherapy refers to an array of strategies intended to treat progressive tumors by augmenting a patient's anti-tumor immune response. As immunotherapy is eventually incorporated into oncology treatment paradigms, it is important to understand how these therapies interact with established cancer treatments such as chemotherapy or Radiotherapy (RT). To address this, we utilized a well-established, autochthonous murine model of prostate cancer to test whether RT could augment (or diminish) the CD4 T cell response to a tumor vaccine. Transgenic mice that develop spontaneous prostate cancer (TRAMP) which also express a unique tumor associated antigen (Influenza hemagglutinin) under the control of a prostate-specific promoter were given local RT in combination with immunotherapy. The immunological outcome of this combinatorial strategy was assayed by monitoring the effector response of adoptively transferred, prostate-specific CD4 T cells. Neither RT nor immunotherapy alone was capable of priming an anti-tumor immune response in animals with evolving tumors. The combination of immunotherapy with RT resulted in anti-tumor T cell activation--this effect was profoundly dependent on the relative timing of RT and immunotherapy. Anti-tumor immune responses occurred when immunotherapy was administered 3-5 weeks post-RT, but such responses were undetectable when immunotherapy was administered either earlier (peri-radiotherapy) or later. The therapeutic temporal window of immunotherapy post-RT suggests that highly aggressive, immuno-suppressive tumors might be most sensitive to immunotherapy in a fairly narrow time window; these results should help to guide future development of clinical combinatorial strategies.
    The Prostate 10/2008; 68(12):1319-29. · 3.84 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3) is a cell-surface molecule with diverse biologic effects on T cell function. We recently showed that LAG-3 signaling is important in CD4+ regulatory T cell suppression of autoimmune responses. Here, we demonstrate that LAG-3 maintains tolerance to self and tumor antigens via direct effects on CD8+ T cells using 2 murine systems. Naive CD8+ T cells express low levels of LAG-3, and expression increases upon antigen stimulation. Our data show increased levels of LAG-3 protein on antigen-specific CD8+ T cells within antigen-expressing organs or tumors. In vivo antibody blockade of LAG-3 or genetic ablation of the Lag-3 gene resulted in increased accumulation and effector function of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells within organs and tumors that express their cognate antigen. Most notably, combining LAG-3 blockade with specific antitumor vaccination resulted in a significant increase in activated CD8+ T cells in the tumor and disruption of the tumor parenchyma. A major component of this effect was CD4 independent and required LAG-3 expression by CD8+ T cells. Taken together, these data demonstrate a direct role for LAG-3 on CD8+ T cells and suggest that LAG-3 blockade may be a potential cancer treatment.
    Journal of Clinical Investigation 12/2007; 117(11):3383-92. · 12.81 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: STAT3 activation has been observed in several autoimmune diseases, suggesting that STAT3-mediated pathways promote pathologic immune responses. We provide in vivo evidence that the fundamental role of STAT3 signaling in autoimmunity relates to its absolute requirement for generating T(H)17 T cell responses. We show that STAT3 is a master regulator of this pathogenic T cell subtype, acting at multiple levels in vivo, including T(H)17 T cell differentiation and cytokine production, as well as induction of RORgamma t and the IL-23R. Neither naturally occurring T(H)17 cells nor T(H)17-dependent autoimmunity occurs when STAT3 is ablated in CD4 cells. Furthermore, ablation of STAT3 signaling in CD4 cells results in increased T(H)1 responses, indicating that STAT3 signaling skews T(H) responses away from the T(H)1 pathway and toward the T(H)17 pathway. Thus, STAT3 is a candidate target for T(H)17-dependent autoimmune disease immunotherapy that could selectively inhibit pathogenic immune pathways.
    The Journal of Immunology 11/2007; 179(7):4313-7. · 5.52 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Expression of the PD-1 receptor on T cells has been shown to provide an important inhibitory signal that down-modulates peripheral effector responses in normal tissues and tumors. Furthermore, PD-1 up-regulation on chronically activated T cells can maintain them in a partially reversible inactive state. The function of PD-1 in the very early stages of T-cell response to antigen in vivo has not been fully explored. In this study, we evaluate the role of PD-1 and its 2 B7 family ligands, B7-H1 (PD-L1) and B7-DC (PD-L2), in early fate decisions of CD8 T cells. We show that CD8 T cells specific for influenza hemagglutinin (HA) expressed as a self-antigen become functionally tolerized and express high levels of surface PD-1 by the time of their first cell division. Blockade of PD-1 or B7-H1, but not B7-DC, at the time of self-antigen encounter mitigates tolerance induction and results in CD8 T-cell differentiation into functional cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs). These findings demonstrate that, in addition to modulating effector functions in the periphery, B7-H1:PD-1 interactions regulate early T-cell-fate decisions.
    Blood 08/2007; 110(1):186-92. · 9.06 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

548 Citations
220 Downloads
2k Views
149.35 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2013
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Biological Chemistry
      Baltimore, MD, United States
  • 2011
    • Bioinformatics Institute of India
      Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • 2009
    • St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
      • Department of Immunology
      Memphis, Tennessee, United States