Bryan Blissmer

University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island, United States

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Publications (44)93.82 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Purpose . Develop and demonstrate preliminary validation of a brief questionnaire aimed at assessing social cognitive determinants of physical activity (PA) in a college population. Design . Quantitative and observational. Setting . A midsized northeastern university. Subjects . Convenience sample of 827 male and female college students age 18 to 24 years. Measures . International Physical Activity Questionnaire and a PA stage-of-change algorithm. Analysis . A sequential process of survey development, including item generation and data reduction analyses by factor analysis, was followed with the goal of creating a parsimonious questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was used for confirmatory factor analysis and construct validation was confirmed against self-reported PA and stage of change. Validation analyses were replicated in a second, independent sample of 1032 college students. Results . Fifteen items reflecting PA self-regulation, outcome expectations, and personal barriers explained 65% of the questionnaire data and explained 28.6% and 39.5% of the variance in total PA and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity PA, respectively. Scale scores were distinguishable across the stages of change. Findings were similar when the Cognitive Behavioral Physical Activity Questionnaire (CBPAQ) was tested in a similar and independent sample of college students (40%; R(2) moderate-to-vigorous-intensity PA = .40; p < .001). Conclusion . The CBPAQ successfully explains and predicts PA behavior in a college population, warranting its incorporation into future studies aiming at understanding and improving on PA behavior in college students.
    American journal of health promotion: AJHP 08/2014; · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the relationship between goal setting and fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption and physical activity (PA) in an intervention for college students.
    Journal of nutrition education and behavior. 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: As the evidence supporting the role of body dissatisfaction (BD) in chronic disease risk factors and health behaviors increases, documenting the prevalence of BD is an essential first step in determining to what degree BD is a public health problem. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study is to critically evaluate research examining the population prevalence of BD among U.S. adults. Seven studies were located and provided estimates of prevalence of BD among U.S. adults that were extremely varied (11%-72% for women, and 8%-61% for men). While some of the variation may be due to increases in BD over time, the literature is also clouded by a lack of randomly selected samples, lack of consistency in measurement tools, lack of consistency in operational definitions of BD, and lack of standardized cut-off points for BD. Recommendations for improving BD prevalence research to enable public health research are provided.
    Eating Behaviors. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Longitudinal predictors of dietary behavior change are important and in need of study. This secondary data analysis combined primary data across three randomized trials to examine transtheoretical model (TTM) and specific dietary predictors of successful dietary change at 12 and 24months separately in treatment and control groups (N=4178). The treatment group received three TTM-tailored print interventions over 12months between 1995 and 2000. Chi-square and MANOVA analyses were used to examine baseline predictors of dietary outcome at 12 and 24months. Last, a multivariable logistic regression was conducted with all baseline variables included. Across all analyses in both treatment and control groups, the most robust predictors of successful change were for TTM-tailored treatment group, preparation stage of change, and increased use of dietary behavior variables such as moderating fat intake, substitution of lower fat foods, and increasing intake of healthful foods. These results provide strong evidence for treatment, stage and behavioral dietary severity effects predicting dietary behavior change over time, and for targeting these variables with the strongest relationships to outcome in interventions, such as TTM-tailored dietary interventions.
    Eating behaviors 08/2013; 14(3):255-62.
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    ABSTRACT: The dominant paradigm of changing multiple health behaviors (MHBs) is based on treating, assessing, and studying each behavior separately. This study focused on individuals with co-occurring baseline health-risk behavior pairs and described whether they changed over time on both or only one of the behaviors within each pair. Data from five randomized trials of computer-tailored interventions (CTIs) that simultaneously treated MHBs were analyzed. The differences between treatment and control proportions that achieved paired action and singular action at 24 months follow-up, and the proportional contribution of paired action to overall change on each behavior, were assessed across 12 behavior pairs (including energy balance, addictive, and appearance-related behaviors). CTIs consistently produced more paired action across behavior pairs. Paired action contributed substantially more to the treatment-related outcomes than singular action. Studying concurrent changes on MHBs as demonstrated allows the effect of simultaneously treating MHBs to be assessed.
    Translational behavioral medicine. 03/2013; 3(1):62-71.
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the effectiveness of two transtheoretical model-tailored, computer-delivered interventions designed to impact multiple substance use or energy balance behaviors in a middle school population recruited in schools. Twenty middle schools in Rhode Island including sixth grade students (N=4,158) were stratified and randomly assigned by school to either a substance use prevention (decreasing smoking and alcohol) or an energy balance (increasing physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, and limiting TV time) intervention group in 2007. Each intervention involved five in-class contacts over a 3-year period with assessments at 12, 24, and 36 months. Main outcomes were analyzed using random effects modeling. In the full energy balance group and in subsamples at risk and not at risk at baseline, strong effects were found for physical activity, healthy diet, and reducing TV time, for both categorical and continuous outcomes. Despite no direct treatment, the energy balance group also showed significantly lower smoking and alcohol use over time than the substance use prevention group. The energy balance intervention demonstrated strong effects across all behaviors over 3 years among middle school students. The substance use prevention intervention was less effective than the energy balance intervention in preventing both smoking and alcohol use over 3 years in middle school students. The lack of a true control group and unrepresented secular trends suggest the need for further study.
    Translational behavioral medicine. 03/2013; 3(1):82-93.
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    ABSTRACT: African-Americans have high rates of physical inactivity-related morbidity and mortality, thus effective interventions to increase exercise are necessary. Tailored interventions show promise, but measures need validation in this population. This study validated transtheoretical model measures for exercise in an African-American sample. Cross-sectional measure development. Telephone survey of individuals in North Carolina. 521 African-American adults. Stages of change, decisional balance (pros and cons), self-efficacy and processes of change (POC) for regular exercise. Confirmatory factor analyses tested measurement models. Multivariate analyses examined relationships between each construct and stages of change. For decisional balance, the two-factor uncorrelated model was the most parsimonious good-fitting model (χ(235) = 158.76; comparative fit index [CFI], .92; average absolute standardized residual [AASR], .04), and alphas were good (pros α = .85 and cons α = .74). The one-factor model for self-efficacy (α = .80) revealed an excellent fit (χ(29) = 45.51; CFI, .96; AASR, .03). For the POC subscales with good alphas (α = .62-.91), a 10-factor fully correlated model fit best (χ(2)[360] = 786.75; CFI, .91; AASR, .04). Multivariate analyses by stage of change replicated expected patterns for the pros, self-efficacy, and POC measures with medium-sized effects (η(2)  =  .05-.13). Results by stage of change did not replicate for the cons scale. The structures of these measures replicated with good internal and external validity, except for the cons scale, which requires additional development. Results support the use of these measures in tailored interventions to increase exercise among African-Americans.
    American journal of health promotion: AJHP 05/2012; 26(5):317-26. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study compared, in treatment and control groups, the phenomena of coaction, which is the probability that taking effective action on one behavior is related to taking effective action on a second behavior. Pooled data from three randomized trials of Transtheoretical Model (TTM) tailored interventions (n=9461), completed in the U.S. in 1999, were analyzed to assess coaction in three behavior pairs (diet and sun protection, diet and smoking, and sun protection and smoking). Odds ratios (ORs) compared the likelihood of taking action on a second behavior compared to taking action on only one behavior. Across behavior pairs, at 12 and 24 months, the ORs for the treatment group were greater on an absolute basis than for the control group, with two being significant. The combined ORs at 12 and 24 months, respectively, were 1.63 and 1.85 for treatment and 1.20 and 1.10 for control. The results of this study with addictive, energy balance and appearance-related behaviors were consistent with results found in three studies applying TTM tailoring to energy balance behaviors. Across studies, there was more coaction within the treatment group. Future research should identify predictors of coaction in more multiple behavior change interventions.
    Preventive Medicine 03/2012; 54(5):331-4. · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this Position Stand is to provide guidance to professionals who counsel and prescribe individualized exercise to apparently healthy adults of all ages. These recommendations also may apply to adults with certain chronic diseases or disabilities, when appropriately evaluated and advised by a health professional. This document supersedes the 1998 American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Position Stand, "The Recommended Quantity and Quality of Exercise for Developing and Maintaining Cardiorespiratory and Muscular Fitness, and Flexibility in Healthy Adults." The scientific evidence demonstrating the beneficial effects of exercise is indisputable, and the benefits of exercise far outweigh the risks in most adults. A program of regular exercise that includes cardiorespiratory, resistance, flexibility, and neuromotor exercise training beyond activities of daily living to improve and maintain physical fitness and health is essential for most adults. The ACSM recommends that most adults engage in moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise training for ≥30 min·d on ≥5 d·wk for a total of ≥150 min·wk, vigorous-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise training for ≥20 min·d on ≥3 d·wk (≥75 min·wk), or a combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity exercise to achieve a total energy expenditure of ≥500-1000 MET·min·wk. On 2-3 d·wk, adults should also perform resistance exercises for each of the major muscle groups, and neuromotor exercise involving balance, agility, and coordination. Crucial to maintaining joint range of movement, completing a series of flexibility exercises for each the major muscle-tendon groups (a total of 60 s per exercise) on ≥2 d·wk is recommended. The exercise program should be modified according to an individual's habitual physical activity, physical function, health status, exercise responses, and stated goals. Adults who are unable or unwilling to meet the exercise targets outlined here still can benefit from engaging in amounts of exercise less than recommended. In addition to exercising regularly, there are health benefits in concurrently reducing total time engaged in sedentary pursuits and also by interspersing frequent, short bouts of standing and physical activity between periods of sedentary activity, even in physically active adults. Behaviorally based exercise interventions, the use of behavior change strategies, supervision by an experienced fitness instructor, and exercise that is pleasant and enjoyable can improve adoption and adherence to prescribed exercise programs. Educating adults about and screening for signs and symptoms of CHD and gradual progression of exercise intensity and volume may reduce the risks of exercise. Consultations with a medical professional and diagnostic exercise testing for CHD are useful when clinically indicated but are not recommended for universal screening to enhance the safety of exercise.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 07/2011; 43(7):1334-59. · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether mindfulness is associated with physical and behavioral measures in first semester college students. Participants: Male and female first year college students (n = 75) from the University of Rhode Island. Height, weight, waist circumference (WC), and blood pressure were assessed and online questionnaires were completed. Independent t tests and Pearson correlations were utilized for analysis. The less mindful group had a higher WC than the more mindful group. Correlations were seen between mindfulness and weight-related behaviors. Mindfulness can impact health status of first year college students, particularly with behavioral measures that have been found to effect weight status. However, additional research is needed focusing on mindfulness as a potential weight gain prevention technique for first year college students in order to decrease chronic disease prevalence.
    Journal of American College Health 06/2011; 59(6):539-45. · 1.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This cross-sectional study (N = 4,144) compared three longitudinal dynatypes (Maintainers, Relapsers, and Stable Smokers) of smokers on baseline demographics, stage, addiction severity, and transtheoretical model effort effect variables. There were significant small-to-medium-sized differences between the Stable Smokers and the other two groups on stage, severity, and effort effect variables in both treatment and control groups. There were few significant, very small differences on baseline effort variables between Maintainers and Relapsers in the control, but not the treatment group. The ability to identify Stable Smokers at baseline could permit enhanced tailored treatments that could improve population cessation rates.
    Substance Use &amp Misuse 03/2011; 46(13):1664-74. · 1.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Weight gain and an increase in overweight and obesity in college students raise serious health concerns. Weight management interventions for college-age men and women might be more effective if they were tailored to subgroups of students with similar behavioral and psychosocial characteristics associated with body weight status. The purpose of this study was to use cluster analysis to identify homogenous subgroups of college-aged men and women enrolled in a weight gain prevention study (Project WebHealth) using baseline data collected in 2008. Project WebHealth was a 15-month nutrition and physical activity intervention designed to decrease the rate of unwanted weight gain in 1,689 college students at eight geographically diverse universities in the United States. Outcome measures included anthropometrics, fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and psychosocial variables associated with weight status in college students. Cluster analysis was performed separately by sex using a two-step clustering procedure using weight-related eating and exercise behaviors and psychosocial variables. Cluster groupings were validated against students' measured weight status and waist circumference as indicators of health risk. The study design was cross-sectional. Results showed that three similar clusters were identified for each sex. Validity of the cluster solution was supported by significant group differences in body mass index and waist circumference with the High Risk cluster at elevated health risk compared to the others. For men, variability in eating competence and cognitive restraint scores contributed most to the difference between clusters, whereas for women, emotional eating and uncontrolled eating scores did. These findings could be used to improve effectiveness of messages and interventions by tailoring them to subgroups of college students with similar behavioral and psychosocial characteristics associated with elevated health risk.
    Journal of the American Dietetic Association 03/2011; 111(3):394-400. · 3.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although physical activity (PA) is a key element in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes, many with this chronic disease do not become or remain regularly active. High-quality studies establishing the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes were lacking until recently, but it is now well established that participation in regular PA improves blood glucose control and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes, along with positively affecting lipids, blood pressure, cardiovascular events, mortality, and quality of life. Structured interventions combining PA and modest weight loss have been shown to lower type 2 diabetes risk by up to 58% in high-risk populations. Most benefits of PA on diabetes management are realized through acute and chronic improvements in insulin action, accomplished with both aerobic and resistance training. The benefits of physical training are discussed, along with recommendations for varying activities, PA-associated blood glucose management, diabetes prevention, gestational diabetes mellitus, and safe and effective practices for PA with diabetes-related complications.
    Diabetes care 12/2010; 33(12):e147-67. · 7.74 Impact Factor
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    Diabetes care 12/2010; 33(12):2692-6. · 7.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Study of Exercise and Nutrition in Older Rhode Islanders (SENIOR) Project II is an intervention study to promote the maintenance of both exercise and healthful eating in older adults. It is the second phase of an earlier study, SENIOR Project I, that originally recruited 1277 community-dwelling older adults to participate in behavior-specific interventions designed to increase exercise and/or fruit and vegetable consumption. The general theoretical framework for this research is the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of Health Behavior Change. The current intervention occurs over a 48-month period, using a manual, newsletters, and phone coaching calls. Annual assessments collect standardized data on behavioral outcomes (exercise and diet), TTM variables (stage of change and self-efficacy), psychosocial variables (social support, depression, resilience, and life satisfaction), physical activity and functioning (SF-36, Up and Go, Senior Fitness Test, and disability assessment), cognitive functioning (Trail Making Test and Forward and Backward Digit Span), physical measures (height, weight, and waist circumference), and demographics. The SENIOR Project II is designed to answer the following question as its primary objective: (1) Does an individualized active-maintenance intervention with older adults maintain greater levels of healthful exercise and dietary behaviors for 4years, compared to a control condition? In addition, there are two secondary objectives: (2) What are the psychosocial factors associated with the maintenance of health-promoting behaviors in the very old? (3) What are the effects of the maintenance of health-promoting behaviors on reported health outcomes, psychosocial measures, anthropometrics, and cognitive status?
    Contemporary clinical trials 10/2010; 32(1):129-39. · 1.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lifestyle interventions can reduce body weight, but weight regain is common and may particularly occur with higher initial weight loss. If so, one may argue whether the 10% weight loss in clinical guidelines is preferable above a lower weight loss. This systematic review explores the relation between weight loss during an intervention and weight maintenance after at least 1 year of unsupervised follow-up. Twenty-two interventions (during at least 1 month) in healthy overweight Caucasians were selected and the mean percentages of weight loss and maintenance were calculated in a standardized way. In addition, within four intervention groups (n > 80) maintenance was calculated stratified by initial weight loss (0-5%, 5-10%, >10%). Overall, mean percentage maintenance was 54%. Weight loss during the intervention was not significantly associated with percentage maintenance (r = -0.26; P = 0.13). Percentage maintenance also not differed significantly between interventions with a weight loss of 5-10% vs. >10%. Consequently, net weight loss after follow-up differed between these categories (3.7 vs. 7.0%, respectively; P < 0.01). The analyses within the four interventions confirmed these findings. In conclusion, percentage maintenance does not clearly depend on initial weight loss. From this perspective, 10% or more weight loss can indeed be encouraged and favoured above lower weight loss goals.
    Obesity Reviews 03/2010; 11(12):899-906. · 6.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to assess if there are consistent treatment, stage, severity, effort and demographic effects which predict long-term changes across the multiple behaviors of smoking, diet and sun exposure. A secondary data analysis integrated data from four studies on smoking cessation (N = 3927), three studies on diet (N = 4824) and four studies on sun exposure (N = 6465). Across all three behaviors, behavior change at 24 months was related to treatment, stage of change, problem severity and effort effects measured at baseline. There were no consistent demographic effects. Across multiple behaviors, long-term behavior changes are consistently related to four effects that are dynamic and open to change. Behavior changes were not consistently related to static demographic variables. Future intervention research can target the four effects to determine if breakthroughs can be produced in changing single and multiple behaviors.
    Journal of Health Psychology 03/2010; 15(2):205-14. · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the relationship between overweight and obesity, age, and gender with physical activity and physical function in community-dwelling older men and women. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to analyze differences between normal weight, overweight, and obese adults (n = 821) above the age of 60 years. Obesity but not overweight was associated with lower levels of physical activity and physical function. Within BMI groups, individuals who were physically active were less likely to have abnormal physical function scores compared to those who were sedentary. Compared to men, obese women had lower physical function scores, placing them at higher risk for future disability. Aging was associated with lower levels of physical activity and physical function. The study illustrates the importance of avoiding obesity and participating in regular physical activity to prevent or slow down the loss of functioning in older age.
    Journal of Aging and Health 12/2009; 21(8):1159-78. · 1.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Increasing levels of physical activity and fitness has become an increasingly important and common target of health promotion programs. Although the direct measurement of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) is the most valid and widely accepted measure of cardiorespiratory fitness, it is not feasible to use this rigorous methodology with numerous study subjects. The Queen's College Step Test (QCT) is a brief submaximal assessment that estimates VO2max using recovery heart rate that we successfully used across 8 research sites with over 1000 participants. However, that research demonstrated the need for improvement of the regression equation for predicting VO2max in men. Thirty-six college-aged males, purposefully selected to represent various fitness levels, completed the QCT and a maximal exercise test in random order and separated by seven days to compare predicted and directly measured VO2max and create a new regression equation. The original, published prediction equation overestimated VO2max by 10% (50.55 vs 46.01 ml·kg-1·min-1). Stepwise regression that included recovery heart rate and measured weight resulted in a more accurate prediction of VO2max [88.38 + (-.157*HR in BPM) + (-.25*weight in Kg)]. When study subjects were stratified into low-, moderate-, and high-fit tertiles based on measured VO2max, the new prediction equation outperformed the published equation for the low and average fitness tertiles. This study demonstrated that it is possible to improve upon the published regression equation for estimating cardiorespiratory fitness via the QCT by adding an easily measured variable, weight. This will provide a more accurate, yet feasible, analysis of our health promotion efforts.
    137st APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition 2009; 11/2009
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    ABSTRACT: The SENIOR II Project attempted to enroll successes from a prior stage-based physical activity and dietary intervention into a new, active maintenance intervention. To be eligible for the study the older adults must have been in action or maintenance stage for either physical activity or fruit and vegetable consumption at the completion of SENIOR I. However, enrollment for SENIOR II began 42 months after the completion of SENIOR I, creating unique challenges for re-recruiting older adults into a new health intervention. There were 789 individuals eligible for enrollment based upon their 24-month data. Various statistical techniques were used to determine differences in 24-month data among older adults that did not enroll versus those who did enroll in the study. Those enrolled were more likely to be female (75% vs. 67%), younger (74.0 vs. 75.9 yrs.), and report excellent/very good health (54% vs. 45%). There were no differences by ethnicity, marital status, income, or education. Behaviorally, those who enrolled in the project were more likely to be in the action/maintenance stages for exercise (70% vs. 57%), use more of the exercise processes of change, and report more physical activity as measured by the Yale Physical Activity Survey. Results suggest that we were able to enroll a fairly representative sample of those eligible at the end of the previous trial into the new active maintenance trial. Discussion will include challenges and strategies of re-recruiting for either a new project or a long-term follow-up in an older adult population after a long hiatus.
    137st APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition 2009; 11/2009

Publication Stats

2k Citations
93.82 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2014
    • University of Rhode Island
      • • Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences
      • • Cancer Prevention Research Center
      Kingston, Rhode Island, United States
  • 2009
    • Harvard University
      • Department of Nutrition
      Cambridge, MA, United States
  • 2003
    • University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
      • Department of Kinesiology and Community Health
      Urbana, IL, United States