Steven D Burdette

Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, United States

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Publications (37)109.84 Total impact

  • Steven D Burdette · Robin Trotman
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    ABSTRACT: Tedizolid phosphate is the second commercially available oxazolidinone antibiotic though the first one in class that is dosed once daily. It is a prodrug that is rapidly converted to the active compound tedizolid. Tedizolid has activity against a wide range of gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). It is approved to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI). In two randomized controlled phase 3 trials, 6 days of tedizolid (200mg once daily) has been proven to be non-inferior to 10 days of linezolid (600mg twice daily). These 2 ABSSSI studies have positioned tedizolid amongst the growing armamentarium of newer, novel, anti-gram positive agents. Tedizolid appears to differ from linezolid in the incidence of gastrointestinal and hematologic side effects and appears to lack drug interactions selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Conditions other than ABSSSI are currently being evaluated in clinical studies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Clinical Infectious Diseases 06/2015; DOI:10.1093/cid/civ501 · 9.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Histoplasmosis may complicate tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α blocker therapy. Published case series provide limited guidance on disease management. We sought to determine the need for long-term antifungal therapy and the safety of resuming TNF-α blocker therapy after successful treatment of histoplasmosis. Methods. We conducted a multicenter retrospective review of 98 patients diagnosed with histoplasmosis between January 2000 and June 2011. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate risk factors for severe disease. Results. The most commonly used biologic agent was infliximab (67.3%). Concomitant corticosteroid use [OR 3.94 (95% CI, 1.06-14.60)] and higher urine Histoplasma antigen levels [OR 1.14 (95% CI, 1.03-1.25)] were found to be independent predictors of severe disease. Forty-six (47.4%) patients were initially treated with an amphotericin B formulation for a median duration of 2 weeks. Azole treatment was given for a median of 12 months. TNF-α blocker therapy was initially discontinued in 95/98 (96.9%) patients and later resumed in 25/74 (33.8%) at a median of 12 months (range, 1-69 months). The recurrence rate was 3.2% at a median follow-up period of 32 months. Of the three recurrent cases, two had restarted TNF-α blocker therapy, one of which was fatal. Mortality rate was 3.2%. Conclusion. In this study, disease outcomes were generally favorable. Discontinuation of antifungal treatment after clinical response and an appropriate duration of therapy, probably at least 12 months, appears safe if pharmacologic immunosuppression has been held. Resumption of TNF-α blocker therapy also appears safe, assuming that the initial antifungal therapy was administered for 12 months.
    Clinical Infectious Diseases 04/2015; DOI:10.1093/cid/civ299 · 9.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose. A case series in which a novel dosing strategy for managing mild, asymptomatic creatine kinase (CK) increases associated with daptomycin therapy is presented. Summary. Eight patients received a mean daptomycin dosage of 7.75 mg/kg/day for a median duration of 42 days. Seven of the eight patients were being treated for a bone and joint infection, and all but one had methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. All patients had asymptomatic increases in CK concentrations during daptomycin therapy (peak range, 400-1200 IU/L). A single daptomycin dose was withheld from each patient, and therapy was resumed 24 hours later, most often at the same dosage. The elevated CK values in these patients resolved, and all patients were able to complete daptomycin therapy without further increases in CK elevations. These findings indicate that withholding one dose of daptomycin during treatment may allow patients with asymptomatic, elevated CK concentrations to continue therapy with CK level normalization. Although the mechanism of daptomycin-mediated muscle injury is not fully understood, a reduction in daptomycin exposure via a one-dose cessation of therapy may allow for physiological restoration of sarcolemma membrane integrity that may be disrupted by daptomycin in individuals exhibiting CK elevation. Conclusion. A single daptomycin dose was withheld from eight patients with asymptomatic increases in serum CK concentrations, then daptomycin therapy was resumed 24 hours later, most often at the previous dosage. The CK concentrations returned to normal, and all patients were able to complete daptomycin therapy without further increases in CK concentrations.
    American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy 07/2014; 71(13):1101-7. DOI:10.2146/ajhp130527 · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. In order to improve our understanding of risk factors, management, diagnosis and outcomes associated with histoplasmosis after solid organ transplantation (SOT), we report a large series of histoplasmosis occurring after SOT. Methods. All cases of histoplasmosis in SOT recipients diagnosed between January 1(st), 2003 and December 31, 2010 at 24 institutions were identified. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected. Results. 152 cases were identified- kidney (51%), liver (16%), kidney/pancreas (14%), heart (9%), lung (5%), pancreas (2%), other (2%). The median time from transplantation to diagnosis was 27 months, but 34% were diagnosed in the first post-transplant year. Twenty-eighty percent of patients had severe disease (requiring intensive care unit admission); 81% had disseminated disease. Urine Histoplasma antigen detection was the most sensitive diagnostic method, positive in 132/142 (93%). An amphotericin formulation was administered initially to 73% of patients for a median duration of 2 weeks; step down therapy with an azole was continued for a median duration of 12 months. Ten percent of patients died due to histoplasmosis with 72% of deaths occurring in the first month after diagnosis; older age and severe disease were risk factors for death from histoplasmosis. Relapse occurred in 6% of patients. Conclusions. While late cases occur, the first year after SOT is the period of highest risk for histoplasmosis. In those who survive the first month after diagnosis, treatment with an amphotericin formulation followed by an azole for 12 months is usually successful with only rare relapse.
    Clinical Infectious Diseases 09/2013; 57(11). DOI:10.1093/cid/cit593 · 9.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a case of eosinophilic pneumonia due to ceftaroline used for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia associated with a postoperative spinal infection. Our patient developed shortness of breath and hypoxemia on the fifth week of ceftaroline therapy. Chest imaging disclosed diffuse bilateral infiltrates. Laboratory abnormalities included peripheral eosinophilia and eosinophilic predominant bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The combination of ceftaroline discontinuation plus initiation of steroid treatment resulted in complete resolution of signs, symptoms, and radiologic abnormalities. We speculate about possible mechanisms underlying this adverse event and diagnostic criteria for drug-induced eosinophilic pneumonia.
    Pharmacotherapy 07/2013; 33(7). DOI:10.1002/phar.1286 · 2.20 Impact Factor
  • E R Dubberke · S D Burdette
    American Journal of Transplantation 03/2013; 13(s4):42-49. DOI:10.1111/ajt.12097 · 6.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Infectious disease (ID) physicians were surveyed concerning knowledge and management of potential transplant-transmitted infections (TTIs). On the basis of cumulative responses to 4 questions that assessed solid organ transplant-related clinical exposures and experience, respondents were divided into 3 groups: most, some, or little transplant experience. Rapid access to donor data was identified as the most important factor when evaluating a potential TTI. Despite varying experience in transplant infections, ID physicians are frequently asked for opinions regarding donor suitability and TTI management. Improved ID physician access to donor information and educational resources will allow more optimal management of potential TTIs.
    Transplant Infectious Disease 09/2012; 15(1). DOI:10.1111/tid.12002 · 1.98 Impact Factor
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    Steven D Burdette · Robin Trotman · John Cmar
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    ABSTRACT: Point-of-care access to current medical information is easily available to the practitioner through the use of smartphones, iPads, and other personal digital assistants. There are numerous mobile applications (apps) that provide easy-to-use and often well-referenced medical guidance for the infectious diseases practitioner. We reviewed 6 commonly utilized mobile apps available for handheld devices: the Emergency Medicine Residents' Association's (EMRA's) Antibiotic Guide, Epocrates Deluxe, Johns Hopkins Antibiotic Guide, Sanford Guide, the Medscape mobile app, and the Infectious Diseases Compendium. We evaluated several basic infectious diseases topics (including but not limited to endocarditis, vancomycin, and Acinetobacter infection) and attempted to objectively score them for metrics that would help the provider determine which mobile app would be most useful for his or her practice. The Johns Hopkins Antibiotic Guide and the Sanford Guide had the highest cumulative scores, whereas EMRA scored the lowest. We found that no single app will meet all of the needs of an infectious diseases physician. Each app delivers content in a unique way and would meet divergent needs for all practitioners, from the experienced clinician to the trainee. The ability to rapidly access trusted medical knowledge at the point of care can help all healthcare providers better treat their patients' infections.
    Clinical Infectious Diseases 07/2012; 55(1):114-25. DOI:10.1093/cid/cis261 · 9.42 Impact Factor
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    N Singh · S Huprikar · S D Burdette · M I Morris · J E Blair · L J Wheat
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    ABSTRACT: Donor-derived fungal infections can be associated with serious complications in transplant recipients. Most cases of donor-derived candidiasis have occurred in kidney transplant recipients in whom contaminated preservation fluid is a commonly proposed source. Donors with cryptococcal disease, including those with unrecognized cryptococcal meningoencephalitis may transmit the infection with the allograft. Active histoplasmosis or undiagnosed and presumably asymptomatic infection in the donor that had not resolved by the time of death can result in donor-derived histoplasmosis in the recipient. Potential donors from an endemic area with either active or occult infection can also transmit coccidioidomycosis. Rare instances of aspergillosis and other mycoses, including agents of mucormycosis may also be transmitted from infected donors. Appropriate diagnostic evaluation and prompt initiation of appropriate antifungal therapy are warranted if donor-derived fungal infections are a consideration. This document discusses the characteristics, evaluation and approach to the management of donor-derived fungal infections in organ transplant recipients.
    American Journal of Transplantation 06/2012; 12(9):2414-28. DOI:10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04100.x · 6.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pyomyositis is an acute bacterial infection of skeletal muscle not arising from contiguous infection. It is often hematogenous in origin and typically associated with abscess formation. Our objective was to determine if there were any differences in the clinical presentation of disease between Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and non-Staphylococcus aureus pyomyositis. We also sought to determine if methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA) occurred more frequently during the final years of the study period. A retrospective chart review study at three institutions in two cities. Sixty cases of pyomyositis were identified between 1990 and 2010. Twenty-nine patients were infected with SA while 31 had other bacterial etiologies or were culture negative. Those with a traumatic event prior to the onset of infection were more likely to have a SA infection while SA infected patients were younger. Our first documented case of MRSA occurred in 2005, but the frequency of MRSA infection remained static over the following five years. Pyomyositis is an emerging infection that is underappreciated by many physicians. While MRSA has emerged as the foremost cause of SA infections in a majority of clinical conditions, in this series most patients still had methicillin-sensitive SA as their cause of pyomyositis. In light of the severity of pyomyositis and the potential for bacteremia (either as a source or complication of the infection), empiric SA therapy should be initiated in all patients until the culture results are available.
    The Journal of infection 01/2012; 64(5):507-12. DOI:10.1016/j.jinf.2012.01.005 · 4.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Staphylococcus aureus (SA) bacteremia (SAB) is associated with a high rate of complications, most of which are related to hematogenous seeding into deep tissues or prosthetic material. SA bacteriuria (SABU) has been described in association with SAB, but has not been evaluated as a predictor for complicated bacteremia, which was the objective of our study. METHODS (DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS): We conducted a retrospective study of patients admitted to the hospital with SAB. The 118 patients included in the study were divided in 2 cohorts: a group with SABU and a group without SA in the urine. We followed the 2 cohorts for an average of 8 months and evaluated the differences in complications and mortality. SABU was found in 28 of 118 patients with SAB. Eighteen patients (64%) in this group had complications from the bacteremia, while in the group without SABU only 33% (30/90 patients) had complications (P = 0.004). The SABU group also had more deaths (32% vs. 14%; P = 0.036). In this population of hospitalized patients with SAB, the presence of SABU was associated with an increased risk of early complications, including septic shock, and with higher mortality. A routine urine culture in search of SABU may be a helpful tool for detection of those patients with SAB who are at increased risk of complications and death.
    Journal of Hospital Medicine 04/2010; 5(4):208-11. DOI:10.1002/jhm.623 · 2.08 Impact Factor
  • Emilio V Perez-Jorge · Steven D Burdette
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    ABSTRACT: This case report describes the differential diagnosis of cutaneous ulcerations and the utility of the interferon-gamma release assays as a tool to aid in the diagnosis. These new assays can be used to identify mycobacterial infections (specifically Mycobacterium marinum) as the etiologic agents.
    Molecular Diagnosis & Therapy 04/2010; 14(2):119-22. DOI:10.2165/11534560-000000000-00000 · 2.59 Impact Factor
  • Steven Burdette
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have higher risk of infections than the general population; however the impact of DM on the clinical outcomes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of DM on the clinical outcomes of hospitalized patients with CAP. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted of the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Organization (CAPO) database from June 2001 to April 2009. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of hospitalized patients with CAP were analyzed and divided into three categories (without DM, controlled DM and uncontrolled DM). Patients were considered to have uncontrolled DM if their blood sugar was > 250 mg/dL on hospital admission. Study outcome was mortality at hospital discharge. Baseline characteristics among the 3 groups were compared using the Chi squared and the Mann-Whitney U tests. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to evaluate the association of mortality between patients without DM vs. patients with controlled DM, and between patients without DM vs. patients with uncontrolled DM. Results: From a total of 3,273 patients, 2,612 patients had DM, 451 patients had controlled DM, and 210 had uncontrolled DM. There was not statistically significant difference in mortality rate for patients with controlled DM vs. patients without DM, 10.2% vs. 7.7%, aOR 1.1 (95% CI 0.78 - 1.66, p =0.50), On the other hand a statistically significant difference was found for patients with uncontrolled DM vs. patients without DM, 14.8% vs. 7.7%, aOR 1.7 (95% CI 1.06 - 2.65, p = 0.03). Conclusion: This study shows that patients with CAP and controlled diabetes don’t have worse outcomes when compare to patients without diabetes. However, patients with uncontrolled diabetes have a significantly increased mortality when compared to patients without diabetes. This data suggests that it is not the presence of diabetes but how well a patient controls their diabetes that will determine their prognosis with CAP.
    Infectious Diseases Society of America 2009 Annual Meeting; 10/2009
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    ABSTRACT: Combination antibiotic therapy is often indicated for health care associated pneumonia due to resistant pathogens and is recommended in the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society (IDSA/ATS) guidelines on the management of CAP and HCAP (3, 4). ...
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 09/2009; 53(10):4568. DOI:10.1128/AAC.00490-09 · 4.45 Impact Factor
  • Emilio V. Perez-Jorge · Steven D. Burdette · Paul Gibbs
    Infectious Disease in Clinical Practice 07/2009; 17(4):261-263. DOI:10.1097/IPC.0b013e31819fe409
  • Steven D Burdette
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    ABSTRACT: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is increasingly common. Treatment with vancomycin-based therapy is often unsuccessful. Daptomycin is a relatively new lipopeptide antibiotic with potent activity against MRSA. To describe the successful management of MRSA infection involving the spine. Two case reports of MRSA infection, one involving epidural and lumbar subdural abscesses, the other with osteomyelitis and discitis. Two cases are described, one with lumbar epidural and subdural abscesses and the other with osteomyelitis and discitis of the spine. Switching from vancomycin to daptomycin plus rifampin-based therapy resulted in patient improvement that allowed discharge from the hospital. Both patients recovered fully from their infection. Daptomycin is a safe and effective option for the treatment of MRSA infection involving the spine.
    The spine journal: official journal of the North American Spine Society 06/2009; 9(6):e5-8. DOI:10.1016/j.spinee.2008.11.008 · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Pyomyositis is a bacterial infection of skeletal muscle caused by transient bacteremia or local extension of a contiguous infection. Pyomyositis was considered rare in temperate climates with 98 reported cases from 1971-1992 in North America. Clinically experience suggests a recent increase in diagnosis of this challenging disease at Miami Valley Hospital (MVH) in Dayton, Ohio. Methods: The MVH IRB approved this study. Medical records (1990-2007) with a primary or secondary discharge diagnosis of infective pyomyositis were reviewed. Charts were reviewed for clinical presentation, laboratory data, radiographic results, intervention (surgical or radiologic) and antimicrobial therapy to ensure the diagnosis. Infections localized to distal extremities were excluded. Results: Thirty-two cases of pyomyositis were identified. Risk factors included diabetes (31.3%), trauma (31.3%), recent procedure (21.9%), and IVDA (12.5%). Clinical manifestations included pain (96.9%), fever (65.6%), swelling (50%), erythema (37.8%), warmth (34.4%), systemic toxicity (15.6%), and fluctuance (3.1%). The mean sed rate and leukocyte count on admission was 77 mm/hr and 13.5 wbc/mcL respectively. Bacteria included: S. aureus (18 total; 7 deep culture, 8 both blood and deep culture, 3 blood culture; 15 MSSA & 3 MRSA), 2 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 2 beta hemolytic strep and 2 viridans group streptococcus. Five were culture negative. All had either an abnormal MRI or CT that assisted with diagnosis. 97% of patients underwent at least 1 drainage procedure (interventional radiology 28.1%, surgical 50%, combined surgical and radiologic drainage 18%). Mean duration of antibiotic treatment was 23.6 days (6-56 days). Conclusions: Pyomyositis is increasingly common in temperate climates and should be in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with pain, fever, swelling and erythema of a muscular area. Risk factors are not reliable and proper imaging is paramount. S. aureus is the most common organism. Treatment includes a drainage procedure with adjuvant antimicrobial therapy.
    Infectious Diseases Society of America 2008 Annual Meeting; 10/2008
  • p M. Polgreen · Steven Burdette · Susan Beekmann · Thomas Herchline
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    ABSTRACT: Background: In 2001, the FDA approved the first interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) for the diagnosis of latent and active tuberculosis. There are several nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) approved for use in the rapid identification of M. tuberculosis in respiratory samples. The purpose of this study was to determine: (1) availability of IGRA; (2) most common indications for ordering IGRA; (3) availability of NAATs for diagnosis of tuberculosis in various clinical scenarios; and (4) timeliness of TB susceptibility results. Methods: The IDSA Emerging Infections Network (EIN) is a sentinel network of infectious disease consultants (IDCs). In January 2008, we distributed a survey via e-mail and facsimile to IDCs. Results: There were 583 respondents (52% of 1122 members). Over half of respondents considered themselves the local tuberculosis expert. More than 85% of respondents from the West North Central and Pacific regions reported availability of QFT, while ≤45% of respondents from the West South Central, South Atlantic and East South Central regions reported availability. Most (31%) respondents used commercial or reference laboratories for IGRA; only 12 states had members who reported that IGRA was performed at a public health lab. NAATs for rapid identification of M. tuberculosis in respiratory samples was available for 66% of respondents in their local areas; only a quarter (22%) reported that local labs would perform these tests directly on smear-negative respiratory samples. Most (266 of 511 providing an answer) indicated that susceptibility testing is performed in a public health laboratory, and 57% of those said results took more than the recommended time (30 days) to return. Conclusions: Significant geographic variability was observed in the availability and use of the interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) for latent tuberculosis. There is limited availability of rapid NAATs among local laboratories. There are significant delays in receiving the results of susceptibility testing.
    Infectious Diseases Society of America 2008 Annual Meeting; 10/2008
  • Emilio V Perez-Jorge · Steven D Burdette
    Southern medical journal 08/2008; 101(7):771-2. DOI:10.1097/SMJ.0b013e31817a8b24 · 1.12 Impact Factor
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    Steven D Burdette · Thomas E Herchline · Richard Oehler
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    ABSTRACT: Mobile technology has the potential to revolutionize how physicians practice medicine. From having access to the latest medical research at the point of care to being able to communicate at a moment's notice with physicians and colleagues around the world, we are practicing medicine in a technological age. During recent years, many physicians have been simultaneously using a pager, cellular telephone, and personal digital assistant (PDA) to keep in communication with the hospital and to access medical information or calendar functions. Many physicians have begun replacing multiple devices with a "smartphone," which functions as a cellular telephone, pager, and PDA. The goal of this article is to provide an overview of the currently available platforms that make up the smartphone devices and the available medical software. Each platform has its unique advantages and disadvantages, and available software will vary by device and is in constant flux.
    Clinical Infectious Diseases 08/2008; 47(1):117-22. DOI:10.1086/588788 · 9.42 Impact Factor