James R Hebert

University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, United States

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Publications (331)1121.15 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recently, there has been an influx of research interest regarding the anti-inflammatory role that diet has in chronic and metabolic diseases. A literature-based dietary inflammatory index (DII) that can be used to characterize the inflammation-modulating capacity of individuals’ diets has even been developed and validated in an American population. We hypothesized that the DII could predict levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), which is an important inflammatory marker, as well as metabolic measures that include the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in European adults. This hypothesis was tested according to data from 1352 participants from the ORISCAV-LUX study, a nationwide, cross-sectional survey based in Luxembourg. Statistical methods consisted of descriptive and multivariable logistic regression analyses. The DII ranged between a minimum of -4.02 (most anti-inflammatory) to a maximum of 4.00 points, with a mean value of -0.41. Participants with higher DII score were significantly younger and had lower BMI, waist circumferences, and systolic blood pressure levels. Other cardiovascular biomarkers including diastolic blood pressure, CRP, lipids, and glycemic biomarkers did not vary significantly across DII tertiles. Participants with pro-inflammatory (>1) DII scores had increased adjusted odds (OR=1.46; 95%CI 1.00-2.13) of having a low HDL-C, compared to those with anti-inflammatory scores (DII≤1). There were no significant relationships between hs-CRP and the DII. This study, which tested the inflammatory capacity of the DII outside the US, did not detect a significant independent relationship with cardiometabolic biomarkers, by using FFQ-collected data. These results are informative and representative of a relevant step in directing future research for nutrition and diet quality.
    Nutrtion research. 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches is increasing with the goal of making more meaningful and impactful advances in eliminating cancer-related health disparities. While many reports have espoused its advantages, few investigations have focused on comparing CBPR-oriented recruitment and retention. Consequently, the purpose of this analysis was to report and compare two different CBPR approaches in two cancer prevention studies. We utilized frequencies and Chi-squared tests to compare and contrast subject recruitment and retention for two studies that incorporated a randomized, controlled intervention design of a dietary and physical activity intervention among African Americans (AA). One study utilized a de-centralized approach to recruitment in which primary responsibility for recruitment was assigned to the general AA community of various church partners whereas the other incorporated a centralized approach to recruitment in which a single lay community individual was hired as research personnel to lead recruitment and intervention delivery. Both studies performed equally well for both recruitment and retention (75 and 88 % recruitment rates and 71 and 66 % retention rates) far exceeding those rates traditionally cited for cancer clinical trials (~5 %). The de-centralized approach to retention appeared to result in statistically greater retention for the control participants compared to the centralized approach (77 vs. 51 %, p < 0.01). Consequently, both CBPR approaches appeared to greatly enhance recruitment and retention rates of AA populations. We further note lessons learned and challenges to consider for future research opportunities.
    Journal of community health. 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether the dietary inflammatory index (DII) is associated with inflammatory or metabolic biomarkers and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) among police officers.
    Journal of occupational and environmental medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 07/2014; · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dietary assessment has long been known to be challenged by measurement error. A substantial amount of literature on methods for determining the effects of error on causal inference has accumulated over the past decades. These methods have unrealized potential for improving the validity of data collected for research studies and national nutritional surveillance, primarily through the NHANES. Recently, the validity of dietary data has been called into question. Arguments against using dietary data to assess diet–health relations or to inform the nutrition policy debate are subject to flaws that fall into 2 broad areas: 1) ignorance or isunderstanding of methodologic issues; and 2) faulty logic in drawing inferences. Nine specific issues are identified in these arguments, indicating insufficient grasp of themethods used for assessing diet and designing nutritional epidemiologic studies. These include a narrow operationalization of validity, failure to properly account for sources of error, and large, unsubstantiated jumps to policy implications. Recent attacks on the inadequacy of 24-h recall–derived data from the NHANES are uninformative regarding effects on estimating risk of health outcomes and on inferences to inform the diet-related health policy debate. Despite errors, for many purposes and inmany contexts, these dietary data have proven to be useful in addressing important research and policy questions. Similarly, structured instruments, such as the food frequency questionnaire, which is the mainstay of epidemiologic literature, can provide useful data when errors are measured and considered in analyses. Adv. Nutr. 5: 447–455, 2014.
    Adv. Nutr. 07/2014; 5:447–455.
  • The Digest. 07/2014; 49(3):1-9.
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    Infectious Agents and Cancer 06/2014; 7(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Cervical cancer prevention knowledge deficits persist among women living with HIV/AIDS (WLHA) despite increased risk of developing cervical dysplasia/cancer. We examined associations between WLHA's cervical cancer prevention knowledge and abnormal Pap test history. We recruited 145 urban and rural WLHA from Ryan White-funded clinics and AIDS service organizations located in the southeastern USA between March 2011 and April 2012. For this analysis, women who reported a history of cervical cancer (n = 3) or had a complete hysterectomy (n = 14) and observations with missing data (n = 22) were excluded. Stata/IC 13 was used to perform cross-tabulations and chi-squared tests. Our sample included 106 predominantly non-Hispanic Black (92 %) WLHA. Mean age was 46.3 ± 10.9 years. Half (50 %) had ≤ high school education. One third (37 %) had low health literacy. The majority (83 %) had a Pap test <1 year ago, and 84 % knew that WLHA should have a Pap test every year, once two tests are normal. Many (68 %) have had an abnormal Pap test. Abnormal Pap test follow-up care knowledge varied. While 86 % knew follow-up care could include a repeat Pap test, only 56 % knew this could also include an HPV test. Significantly, more women who had an abnormal Pap test knew follow-up care could include a biopsy (p = 0.001). For WLHA to make informed/shared decisions about their cervical health, they need to be knowledgeable about cervical cancer care options across the cancer control continuum. Providing WLHA with prevention knowledge beyond screening recommendations seems warranted given their increased risk of developing cervical dysplasia/neoplasia.
    Journal of cancer education : the official journal of the American Association for Cancer Education. 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background: This study examined a PERIOD3 (PER3) gene variable number tandem repeat polymorphism and chronotype as potential BrCA risk factors among Indian women. Methods: This case-control study included sporadic, histologically confirmed BrCA cases (n = 255) and controls (n = 249) from India with data collection from 2010-2012. Results: Women with the 4/5 or 5/5 PER3 genotype had a nonstatistically significant 33% increased odds of BrCA. Cases were more likely to have a morning (OR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.23-4.81) or evening (OR = 2.55, 95% CI = 1.19-5.47) chronotype. Conclusions: Findings are consistent with the possibility that extremes in chronotype may elicit circadian desynchronization, resulting in increased BrCA susceptibility.
    Cancer Investigation 06/2014; · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether moderate cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) or moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) is associated with elevations in resting metabolic rate (RMR) similar to findings previously observed in endurance athletes. Using a cross-sectional design, we measured CRF, RMR, body composition, energy expenditure, and time in MVPA via an arm-based activity monitor in 423 young adults (mean age, 27.6 years). Based on the results of a fitness test, participants were classified into CRF tertiles (low, moderate, or high) by sex. There were significant differences among the low-, moderate-, and high-CRF groups for mean ± SD body mass index (calculated as the weight in kilograms divided by the height in meters squared) (28.1±4.1, 25.1±3.4, and 23.6±2.5, respectively; P<.001) and fat mass (28.8±9.7, 20.5±8.2, and 14.8±6.5 kg, respectively; P<.001) but not fat-free mass (53.1±11.5, 53.5±12.4, and 54.7±12.1 kg, respectively; P=.49). There were no differences in mean ± SD unadjusted RMR among the groups (1533.2±266.2, 1519.7±267.6, and 1521.9±253.9 kcal/d, respectively). However, after statistical adjustment for differences in body composition, the moderate- and high-CRF groups had a higher RMR compared with low-CRF individuals by 39.7 and 59.9 kcal/d, respectively (P<.05). After further adjustment for MVPA, RMR was higher in the high-CRF group compared with the low-CRF group by 51.2 kcal/d (P<.05). In this large sample of young adults representing a range of CRF, there was a positive stepwise gradient in RMR across tertiles of CRF independent of body composition. Also, MVPA was independently associated with RMR, although this relationship was modest. These findings underscore the multidimensional role of CRF and MVPA on health. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01746186.
    Mayo Clinic Proceedings 05/2014; · 5.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND Proinflammatory cytokine levels may be associated with cancer stage, recurrence, and survival. The objective of this study was to determine whether cytokine levels were associated with dietary patterns and fat-soluble micronutrients in patients with previously untreated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).METHODS This was a cross-sectional study of 160 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC who completed pretreatment food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and health surveys. Dietary patterns were derived from FFQs using principal component analysis. Pretreatment serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and serum carotenoid and tocopherol levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Multivariable ordinal logistic regression models examined associations between cytokines and quartiles of reported and serum dietary variables.RESULTSThree dietary patterns emerged: whole foods, Western, and convenience foods. In multivariable analyses, higher whole foods pattern scores were significantly associated with lower levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ (P ≤ .001, P = .008, and P = .03, respectively). Significant inverse associations were reported between IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ levels and quartiles of total reported carotenoid intake (P = .006, P = .04, and P = .04, respectively). There was an inverse association between IFN-γ levels and serum α-tocopherol levels (P = .03).CONCLUSIONS Consuming a pretreatment diet rich in vegetables, fruit, fish, poultry, and whole grains may be associated with lower proinflammatory cytokine levels in patients with HNSCC. Cancer 2014. © 2014 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 05/2014; · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Consuming a diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables is critical for preventing cancer and cancer-related disparities. Food systems approaches that increase spatial-temporal, economic, and social access to fruits and vegetables may ultimately result in improved consumption patterns among Americans. Engaging the triad of Cooperative Extension Services, public health systems, and community health centers may yield maximal public health benefits from food systems interventions. These entities have a mutual interest in promoting health equity and community and economic vitality that provides common ground to (a) implement solutions through the dissemination of evidence-based programs and (b) share resources to foster grassroots support for sustained change. Working together, these systems have an unprecedented opportunity to build on their common ground to implement, evaluate, and disseminate evidence-based food systems interventions in communities and with populations experiencing disparate risk for cancer and cancer-related diseases.
    Journal of Cancer Education 04/2014; · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Asthma prevalence has increased in recent years and evidence suggests that diet may be a contributing factor. Increased use of processed foods has led to a decrease in diet quality, which may be creating a pro-inflammatory environment, thereby leading to the development and/or progression of various chronic inflammatory diseases and conditions. Recently, the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) has been developed and validated to assess the inflammatory potential of individual diets.Objective This study aimed to examine the DII in subjects with asthma compared to healthy controls and to relate the DII to asthma risk, lung function and systemic inflammation.Methods Subjects with asthma (n=99) and healthy controls (n=61) were recruited. Blood was collected and spirometry was performed. The DII was calculated from food frequency questionnaires administered to study subjects.ResultsThe mean DII score for the asthmatics was higher than the DII score for healthy controls (-1.40 versus -1.86, p=0.04), indicating their diets were more pro-inflammatory. For every 1 unit increase in DII score the odds of having asthma increased by 70% (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.14; p=0.040). FEV1 was significantly associated with DII score (β=-3.44, 95% CI: -6.50,-0.39; p=0.020), indicating that for every 1 unit increase in DII score, FEV1 decreased by 3.44 times. Furthermore, plasma IL-6 concentrations were positively associated with DII score (β=0.13, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.21;p=0.002).Conclusion and clinical relevanceAs assessed using the DII score, the usual diet consumed by asthmatics in this study was pro-inflammatory relative to the diet consumed by the healthy controls. The DII score was associated with increased systemic inflammation and lower lung function. Hence, consumption of pro-inflammatory foods may contribute to worse asthma status and targeting an improvement in DII in asthmatics, as an indicator of suitable dietary intake, might be a useful strategy for improving clinical outcomes in the disease.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Clinical & Experimental Allergy 04/2014; · 4.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Weight dissatisfaction, defined as discordance between actual and goal weight, may be associated with increased risk for several obesity-related comorbidities. The purpose of the study was to examine the association between weight dissatisfaction and risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Method: This longitudinal study used data from 9,584 adults enrolled in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. Key variables included multiple measures of measured weight, self-reported goal weight, and incident diabetes. Weight dissatisfaction was defined as being above the median of measured weight minus goal weight. Cox proportional hazards regression estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for diabetes incidence by weight dissatisfaction. Results: HRs for time until diabetes diagnosis revealed that family history of diabetes (HR = 1.46, 95% CI [1.13, 1.90]), age (HR = 1.03, 95% CI [1.02, 1.04]), and weight dissatisfaction (HR = 1.83, 95% CI [1.50, 2.25]) at baseline were statistically significant predictors. Longitudinally, higher risk was observed in individuals who either stayed dissatisfied (HR = 2.98, 95% CI [1.98, 4.48]) or became dissatisfied (HR = 1.51, 95% CI [0.79, 2.89]), compared with those who stayed satisfied. After additional adjustment for BMI, the elevated HR for those who remained dissatisfied compared with those who remained satisfied persisted (HR = 2.85, 95% CI [1.89, 4.31]). Conclusions: Weight dissatisfaction, regardless of BMI, represents a potentially important psychophysiological modifier of the relationships between BMI and risk of Type 2 diabetes, and warrants greater attention in future studies of chronic disease risk. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Health Psychology 03/2014; · 3.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches that involve community and academic partners in activities ranging from protocol design through dissemination of study findings can increase recruitment of medically underserved and underrepresented racial/ethnic minority populations into biomedical research. Five cancer screening and prevention trials in three National Cancer Institute (Bethesda, MD)-funded Community Networks Program Centers (CNPC), in Florida, Kansas, and South Carolina, were conducted across diverse populations. Data were collected on total time period of recruitment, ratios of participants enrolled over potential participants approached, selected CBPR strategies, capacity-building development, and systematic procedures for community stakeholder involvement. Community-engaged approaches used included establishing colearning opportunities, participatory procedures for community-academic involvement, and community and clinical capacity building. A relatively large proportion of individuals identified for recruitment was actually approached (between 50% and 100%). The proportion of subjects who were eligible among all those approached ranged from 25% to more than 70% (in the community setting). Recruitment rates were very high (78%-100% of eligible individuals approached) and the proportion who refused or who were not interested among those approached was very low (5%-11%). Recruitment strategies used by the CNPCs were associated with low refusal and high enrollment ratios of potential subjects. Adherence to CBPR principles in the spectrum of research activities, from strategic planning to project implementation, has significant potential to increase involvement in biomedical research and improve our ability to make appropriate recommendations for cancer prevention and control programming in underrepresented diverse populations. CBPR strategies should be more widely implemented to enhance study recruitment. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 23(3); 416-23. ©2014 AACR.
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers &amp Prevention 03/2014; 23(3):416-423. · 4.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches that involve community and academic partners in activities ranging from protocol design through dissemination of study findings can increase recruitment of medically underserved and underrepresented racial/ethnic minority populations into biomedical research. Methods: Five cancer screening and prevention trials in three National Cancer Institute (Bethesda, MD)–funded Community Networks Program Centers (CNPC), in Florida, Kansas, and South Carolina, were conducted across diverse populations. Data were collected on total time period of recruitment, ratios of participants enrolled over potential participants approached, selected CBPR strategies, capacity-building development, and systematic procedures for community stakeholder involvement. Results: Community-engaged approaches used included establishing colearning opportunities, participatory procedures for community–academic involvement, and community and clinical capacity building. A relatively large proportion of individuals identified for recruitment was actually approached (between 50% and 100%). The proportion of subjects who were eligible among all those approached ranged from 25% to more than 70% (in the community setting). Recruitment rates were very high (78%–100% of eligible individuals approached) and the proportion who refused or who were not interested among those approached was very low (5%–11%). Conclusions: Recruitment strategies used by the CNPCs were associated with low refusal and high enrollment ratios of potential subjects. Adherence to CBPR principles in the spectrum of research activities, from strategic planning to project implementation, has significant potential to increase involvement in biomedical research and improve our ability to make appropriate recommendations for cancer prevention and control programming in underrepresented diverse populations. Impact: CBPR strategies should be more widely implemented to enhance study recruitment. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 23(3); 416–23. ©2014 AACR.
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers &amp Prevention 03/2014; 23:416-423. · 4.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: African Americans (AA) are more likely to develop and die from cancer than any other racial or ethnic group. This study assessed older and younger/middle-aged African-American (AA) men's (1) knowledge and attitudes about prostate cancer (PrCA) and PrCA screening, (2) participation in clinical research, and (3) health and cancer-related decision making. Twenty-eight AA men (14 older, mean age 59.8; 14 younger/middle age, mean age 30.4) received a PrCA education program and completed pre/post-education program surveys, as well as qualitative post-education interviews. Younger/middle-aged men were more knowledgeable about PrCA and PrCA screening than older men. Older men reported being invited to participate in a clinical trial more often than younger men but were more likely to report that participation in clinical trials was risky and they did not plan to participate in medical research in the future. Younger/middle-aged men were more willing to participate in a clinical trial in the future and reported fewer barriers to participation in clinical research. There is potential for using intergenerational communication strategies with older/younger AA male dyads in PrCA interventions.
    Journal of Cancer Education 02/2014; · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective was to estimate race-specific proportions of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) attributable to overweight and obesity in South Carolina. South Carolina birth certificate and hospital discharge data were obtained from 2004 to 2006. Women who did not have type 2 diabetes mellitus before pregnancy were classified with GDM if a diagnosis was reported in at least one data source. Relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals were calculated using the log-binomial model. The modified Mokdad equation was used to calculate population attributable fractions for overweight body mass index (BMI: 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)), obese (30.0-34.9 kg/m(2)), and extremely obese (≥35 kg/m(2)) women after adjusting for age, gestational weight gain, education, marital status, parity, tobacco use, pre-pregnancy hypertension, and pregnancy hypertension. Overall, the adjusted RR of GDM was 1.6, 2.3, and 2.9 times higher among the overweight, obese, and extremely obese women compared to normal-weight women in South Carolina. RR of GDM for extremely obese women was higher among White (3.1) and Hispanic (3.4) women than that for Black women (2.6). The fraction of GDM cases attributable to extreme obesity was 14.0 % among White, 18.1 % among Black, and 9.6 % among Hispanic women. The fraction of GDM cases attributable to obesity was about 12 % for all racial groups. Being overweight (BMI: 25.0-29.9) explained 8.8, 7.8, and 14.4 % of GDM cases among White, Black, and Hispanic women, respectively. Results indicate a significantly increased risk of GDM among overweight, obese, and extremely obese women. The strength of the association and the proportion of GDM cases explained by excessive weight categories vary by racial/ethnic group.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 02/2014; · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Shift workers are affected by diet- and inflammation-related diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. We examined a dietary inflammatory index (DII) in relation to shift work from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data (2005 to 2010). The DII was calculated using data from a 24-hour dietary recall. Shift work categories included day workers, evening/night shift workers, or rotating shift workers. General linear models were fit to examine the relationship between shift work and adjusted mean DII values. Among all shift workers and specifically rotating shift workers, higher (ie, more pro-inflammatory) mean DII scores (1.01 and 1.07 vs 0.86; both P ≤ 0.01) were observed compared with day workers. Women tended to express strong evening/night shift effects. More proinflammatory diets observed among shift workers may partially explain increased inflammation-related chronic disease risk observed in other studies among shift workers compared with their day-working counterparts.
    Journal of occupational and environmental medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 01/2014; · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Excess body weight is associated with an imbalance between energy expenditure and dietary intake but evidence on the association between diet quality and body composition remains equivocal. Rather than relying on differences in diet quality between overweight/obese and normal weight adults, this study examined the association between the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010) and body fatness on a continuous scale, independent of physical activity (PA). Further the association between components of the HEI-2010 and risk for overweight/obesity was explored. 407 adults (27.6 ± 3.7 years) provided at least two 24-hour diet recalls over a period of 14 days, which were used to calculate the HEI-2010. Percent body fat (BF) was assessed via dual X-ray absorptiometry and PA was determined via a multi-sensor device, worn over a period of 10 days. PA was a stronger contributor to the variability in BF than the HEI-2010 and the association between HEI-2010 and BF was significant only in men. Particularly a high consumption of protein, sodium and empty calories increased the risk for overweight/obesity. Adherence to dietary guidelines positively affects body fatness in men, independent of PA. In contrast to current dietary recommendations, the risk for overweight/obesity was increased with a higher protein intake.
    Scientific Reports 01/2014; 4:4928. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose We examined the association between three predefined dietary indices and both cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and long-term mortality in adult Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study’s participants. Methods: Between 1987-1999, 12,449(77% male) participants aged 20-84 years completed a clinical examination, which included dietary assessment by 3-day diet records. Three dietary indices were calculated: the Ideal Diet Index (IDI), the Diet Quality Index (DQI) and the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS). CVD risk factors measurements included body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, fasting glucose, blood pressure and cardiorespiratory fitness. We calculated hazard ratios from Cox regression analyses, adjusting for potential confounders including physical fitness. Results: Higher IDI, DQI and MDS scores were consistently associated with lower BMI, cholesterol and glucose levels, and diastolic blood pressure, and higher cardiorespiratory fitness (all p<0.05). However, after adjusting for age, sex, energy intake, and baseline examination year, the indices were not significantly related to all-cause, CVD or cancer mortality. No association was observed in fully adjusted models, which controlled for fitness. Conclusion: Though these dietary indices based on 3-day diet records are strongly associated cross-sectionally to CVD risk profile of middle-aged men and women, they do not add to ability to predict long-term mortality in follow up.
    Annals of epidemiology 01/2014; · 2.95 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

6k Citations
1,121.15 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000–2014
    • University of South Carolina
      • • Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics
      • • Department of Exercise Science
      Columbia, South Carolina, United States
  • 2013
    • Shanghai University
      Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, China
    • Elsevier B.V.
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
    • Columbia College SC
      Columbia, South Carolina, United States
    • Beijing Sport University
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2011–2013
    • Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
      • Department of Preventive Medicine & Biometrics
      Maryland, United States
    • University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
      • Office of Public Health Studies
      Honolulu, HI, United States
    • Bethesda Hospital
      Jogjakarta, Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta, Indonesia
    • Arizona State University
      Phoenix, Arizona, United States
    • Oregon Research Institute
      Eugene, Oregon, United States
  • 2012
    • Albert Einstein College of Medicine
      • Department of Epidemiology & Population Health
      New York City, NY, United States
  • 2010–2012
    • University of Georgia
      • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
      Athens, GA, United States
    • National Cancer Institute (USA)
      • Nutritional Epidemiology
      Maryland, United States
  • 2009–2011
    • Queen's University
      • • School of Kinesiology and Health Studies
      • • Department of Community Health and Epidemiology
      Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    • Karolinska Institutet
      • Institutionen för biovetenskaper och näringslära
      Solna, Stockholm, Sweden
    • University of Houston
      • Department of Health and Human Performance
      Houston, TX, United States
    • York University
      • School of Kinesiology and Health Sciences
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
      San Francisco, CA, United States
  • 2006–2011
    • Healis Sekhsaria Institute For Public Health
      Mumbai, Mahārāshtra, India
  • 1990–2011
    • University of Massachusetts Medical School
      • • Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
      • • Department of Medicine
      Worcester, MA, United States
  • 2005–2010
    • Medical University of South Carolina
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Hollings Cancer Center
      Charleston, SC, United States
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      • Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity
      Druid Hills, GA, United States
  • 2008
    • Harvard University
      • Department of Nutrition
      Cambridge, MA, United States
    • University of Rochester
      • Department of Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology
      Rochester, NY, United States
    • University of Rhode Island
      • Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences
      Kingston, RI, United States
  • 1992–2006
    • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
      • Center for Community-Based Research
      Boston, MA, United States
    • Indiana State University
      • Department of Psychology
      Indiana, United States
  • 2001–2005
    • Vanderbilt University
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Center for Health Services Research
      • • Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC)
      Nashville, MI, United States
  • 2004
    • Emory University
      • School of Medicine
      Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • 2002
    • University of Westminster
      • Department of Biomedical Sciences
      London, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 1998–1999
    • Tata Institute of Fundamental Research
      • Basic Dental Research Unit
      Mumbai, State of Maharashtra, India
    • Honolulu University
      Honolulu, Hawaii, United States
  • 1994
    • University of Massachusetts Amherst
      Amherst Center, Massachusetts, United States