A P Disney

The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Tarndarnya, South Australia, Australia

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Publications (50)178.58 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Psychosocial factors are associated with clinical outcomes in patients with end-stage renal disease. It is not known if self-reported depression and quality of life influence the likelihood of being wait-listed and receiving a transplant. Prevalent cross section of 18- to 65-year-old hemodialysis (HD) patients in the USA (N = 2033) and seven European countries (N = 4350) from the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study phase II and III was analyzed. Wait-listed patients (N = 1838) were followed until kidney transplantation. Self-reported depressive symptoms were assessed by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale, 10-item version (CES-D) and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) by the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form 12 scale Physical Component Score (PCS). At study entry, 27% (USA) to 53% (UK) of patients were wait-listed in participating countries. Variables associated with lower odds of being on the waiting list included worse HR-QoL, more severe depressive symptoms, older age, fewer years of education, lower serum albumin, lower hemoglobin, shorter time on dialysis and presence of multiple comorbid conditions. Among wait-listed patients, significantly lower transplantation rates were seen for females, blacks, patients having prior transplantation and multiple comorbid conditions but not PCS or CES-D. Fewer depressive symptoms and better HR-QoL are associated with being on the waiting list in prevalent HD patients but not with receiving a kidney transplant among wait-listed dialysis patients. Regular assessment of subjective well-being may help identify patients with reduced access to wait-listing and kidney transplantation.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 11/2011; 27(5):2107-13. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using data from the international Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS), we determined incidence, prevalence, and outcomes among hemodialysis patients with atrial fibrillation. Cox proportional hazards models, to identify associations with newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation and clinical outcomes, were stratified by country and study phase and adjusted for descriptive characteristics and comorbidities. Of 17,513 randomly sampled patients, 2188 had preexisting atrial fibrillation, with wide variation in prevalence across countries. Advanced age, non-black race, higher facility mean dialysate calcium, prosthetic heart valves, and valvular heart disease were associated with higher risk of new atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation at study enrollment was positively associated with all-cause mortality and stroke. The CHADS2 score identified approximately equal-size groups of hemodialysis patients with atrial fibrillation with low (less than 2) and higher risk (more than 4) for subsequent strokes on a per 100 patient-year basis. Among patients with atrial fibrillation, warfarin use was associated with a significantly higher stroke risk, particularly in those over 75 years of age. Our study shows that atrial fibrillation is common and associated with elevated risk of adverse clinical outcomes, and this risk is even higher among elderly patients prescribed warfarin. The effectiveness and safety of warfarin in hemodialysis patients require additional investigation.
    Kidney International 06/2010; 77(12):1098-106. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hemodialysis patients are at increased risk of amputation, particularly those with diabetes. Limited data exist about the prevalence, incidence, risk factors for, and sequelae of amputation in hemodialysis patients. A prospective observational study of hemodialysis practices and outcomes. Data from 29,838 patients in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) from 1996 to 2004 were analyzed. PREDICTOR/FACTOR: Demographic factors, comorbid conditions, laboratory values, years since end-stage renal disease onset, and currently prescribed medications at study enrollment. Prior amputation at study enrollment by using logistic regression and amputation during follow-up by using Cox models. Amputation was ascertained from medical record review. There was a high prevalence (6%) and incidence (2.0 events/100 patient-years at risk) of amputation in hemodialysis patients; patients with diabetes had a more than 9 times greater incidence of new amputation. Wide variations among countries were observed in risk of amputation, with the lowest prevalence in Japan and the highest in Belgium, France, and Germany. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors, such as age, peripheral vascular disease, and smoking were predictive of amputation, as were such risk factors related to hemodialysis as altered mineral metabolism and years of hemodialysis therapy. In patients with diabetes, greater relative risks of amputation were observed in men, smokers, and those with other diabetic complications, anemia, and malnutrition. The relative risk of mortality after amputation was 1.54 (95% confidence interval, 1.41 to 1.68; P < 0.001) with a mean survival of 2.0 versus 3.8 years. The database does not differentiate between types of amputations; some amputations may have concerned the upper limbs and could have been linked to ischemia related to vascular access. Amputation in hemodialysis patients is a very frequent event, particularly in patients with diabetes, and is associated with both traditional cardiovascular risk factors and factors linked to kidney failure treated by hemodialysis. Interventional trials are needed to reduce the burden of amputation.
    American Journal of Kidney Diseases 08/2009; 54(4):680-92. · 5.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare injection site pain of subcutaneous (sc) epoetin beta and darbepoetin alfa in adult patients with chronic kidney disease. This was a multi-centre, randomised, two-arm, single-blind, cross-over study. Patients were randomised to receive weekly sc darbepoetin alfa 30 mug or weekly sc epoetin beta 6000 IU for 2 weeks and were then crossed over to the alternative treatment for 2 weeks. Injection site pain was assessed using a 10 cm ungraduated visual analogue scale (0 = no pain, 10 = worst pain) and a six-point verbal rating scale. Patient preference for treatment was also assessed. http://clinicaltrials. gov/(NCT00377481). All randomised patients (N = 48) completed the study. The sample comprised 29 chronic kidney disease patients (Stage 3 or Stage 4), 11 peritoneal dialysis patients and 8 renal transplant patients. Patients perceived significantly less pain with epoetin beta than darbepoetin alfa, using the visual analogue scale (relative pain score = 2.75, darbepoetin alfa:epoetin beta, 95% CI: 1.85, 4.07; p < 0.0001) and the verbal rating scale (median: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.5, 1.0 vs. median: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.0; p < 0.0001). Epoetin beta was preferred by significantly more patients (65%) than darbepoetin alfa (10%) (p < 0.001); 25% of patients reported no preference. Limitations included lack of an epoetin alfa comparator and limited blinding (patients were blinded to treatment, however, an unblinded nurse administered treatment). We show that sc injection of epoetin beta is significantly less painful than darbepoetin alfa and patient preference for epoetin beta confirms that the difference is clinically meaningful.
    Current Medical Research and Opinion 06/2008; 24(8):2181-7. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The recombinant human erythropoietins epoetins alfa and beta have relatively short half-lives ( approximately 24 h by subcutaneous route) and have traditionally been administered 2 or 3 times a week for the treatment of anaemia in patients with chronic kidney disease. However, multiple weekly injections are inconvenient for both the patient and the healthcare provider. With the introduction of the longer-acting erythropoiesis-stimulating agent darbepoetin alfa, there has been growing interest in longer dosing intervals for erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Data from several randomized studies have shown that darbepoetin alfa is effective in maintaining haemoglobin levels when administered (subcutaneously, intravenously or both) every 2 weeks in dialysis patients, and every 2 weeks or monthly in patients with chronic kidney disease not yet receiving dialysis. Moreover, intravenous administration with darbepoetin alfa does not require a higher dosage compared with the subcutaneous route. Epoetins alfa and beta have also been studied in similar schedules, although few data from well-designed studies are available. Current data suggest that once-weekly administration of these forms of epoetin is feasible in dialysis patients, but dose increases are often required when switching patients from traditional twice- or thrice-weekly schedules. Also, administration of epoetins every other week is feasible in selected patients with chronic renal insufficiency. Further study is required to clarify the optimum schedule for epoetins in these settings.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 07/2007; 22 Suppl 4:iv19-iv30. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Darbepoetin alfa, an erythropoiesis-stimulating protein, has a longer serum half-life than recombinant human erythropoietin, allowing less-frequent administration. This study aimed to demonstrate that once-monthly (QM) darbepoetin alfa administration would maintain haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) not receiving dialysis who had previously been administered darbepoetin alfa every 2 weeks (Q2W). This was a multicentre study in which subjects with CKD receiving stable Q2W darbepoetin alfa doses and with stable Hb (100-130 g/L) were started on QM darbepoetin alfa dosing. The initial QM darbepoetin alfa dose was equivalent to the cumulative darbepoetin alfa dose administered during the month preceding enrollment. Darbepoetin alfa doses were titrated to maintain Hb concentrations between 100 and 130 g/L. The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects maintaining mean Hb >or= 100 g/L during the evaluation period (weeks 21-33). Sixty-six subjects were enrolled in the study and all received at least one dose of darbepoetin alfa; 55 (83%) had mean Hb >or= 100 g/L during evaluation. Mean (SD) Hb concentrations at baseline and during the evaluation period were 119 (8.7) g/L and 114 (9.8) g/L, respectively. The median QM darbepoetin alfa dose at baseline and during the evaluation period was 80 microg. Darbepoetin alfa was considered to be well-tolerated. Patients with CKD not receiving dialysis who are receiving darbepoetin alfa Q2W can be safely and effectively extended to darbepoetin alfa QM. Dosing QM may simplify anaemia management for patients and health-care providers.
    Nephrology 03/2007; 12(1):95-101. · 1.69 Impact Factor
  • Nephrology 11/2005; 10 Suppl 4:S61-80. · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Studies have consistently shown the superior dosing efficiency of subcutaneous (s.c.) compared to intravenous (i.v.) erythropoietin (r-HuEPO). Unlike r-HuEPO, data from pivotal darbepoetin trials support s.c. and i.v. dosing equivalence, however, no blinded cross-over randomized studies of s.c. and i.v. dose efficiency or intra-patient variability in response have been published. During this 12-month study, 53 haemodialysis patients were randomized to s.c. or i.v. darbepoetin for a 6-month period and then switched to the alternative route for a second 6-month period. Darbepoetin dose was titrated during the first 4-months of each period to achieve a stable haemoglobin during the final 2-month observation period of each arm. Twenty-four patients were included in analysis. No significant difference between s.c. and i.v. administration was observed for any measured parameter. Patients achieved a non-significantly higher haemoglobin (123.6 +/- 3.76 vs 120.9 +/- 4.42 g/L, P = 0.11) from a non-significantly lower darbepoetin dose (40.8 +/- 10.7 vs 42.5 +/- 11.0 mcg/week, P = 0.23) with i.v. administration. The population-based weight normalized s.c./i.v. dose ratio was 1.04 (0.97-1.11). Despite no significant overall difference, some patients experienced changes in individual dose efficiency response. Three of 24 patients recorded a greater than 30% change, four of 24 recorded between a 20 and 30% change, and five of 24 patients recorded between a 10 and 20% change relative to i.v. dose efficiency. This study further supports s.c. and i.v. dosing equality and that overall the more convenient i.v. route can be used with equal dosing efficiency. However, patients switching routes of administration should be monitored due to the wide range in individual response.
    Nephrology 05/2005; 10(2):129-35. · 1.69 Impact Factor
  • Nephrology 01/2005; 10. · 1.69 Impact Factor
  • Nephrology 01/2005; 10. · 1.69 Impact Factor
  • Nephrology 01/2005; 10. · 1.69 Impact Factor
  • Nephrology 01/2005; 10. · 1.69 Impact Factor
  • Nephrology 01/2005; 10. · 1.69 Impact Factor
  • Nephrology 01/2005; 10. · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative Guidelines for Vascular Access in hemodialysis patients recommend native arteriovenous (AV) fistulae over AV grafts or catheters for permanent vascular access. They recommend letting fistulae mature > or =1 month before cannulation. The Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) provides an unparalleled means to examine vascular access practice patterns and guidelines internationally, with particular attention to associations with mortality risk. Most patients in Europe and Japan dialyze through AV fistulae and very few use AV grafts; in the United States, more patients use grafts than fistulae. Patients who receive nephrologic care for over 30 days before starting dialysis have significantly higher chances of commencing via AV fistula. Medical directors of dialysis facilities in the United States commonly prefer grafts; in Europe and Japan, most prefer fistulae. In the United States, there is a relatively long average time between fistula creation and cannulation but significantly worse fistula survival than that seen in Europe. Tunneled catheters pose a higher mortality risk than permanent accesses and are associated with increased risk of failure of a subsequent fistula. The percentage of prevalent patients in the DOPPS countries using catheters has increased in recent years. DOPPS data suggest that performance in some countries falls short of practices achieved in other countries. AV fistula use is low in the United States but has been improving. The trend of increasing use of catheters in most countries is discouraging. The DOPPS will continue to monitor practice trends and explore whether greater application of guidelines will lead to fewer access complications and improved longevity for hemodialysis patients.
    American Journal of Kidney Diseases 12/2004; 44(5 Suppl 2):22-6. · 5.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is not known whether prevention of anemia among patients with chronic kidney disease would affect the development or progression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. A randomized controlled trial was performed with 155 patients with chronic kidney disease (creatinine clearance, 15 to 50 ml/min), with entry hemoglobin concentrations ([Hb]) of 110 to 120 g/L (female patients) or 110 to 130 g/L (male patients). Patients were monitored for 2 yr or until they required dialysis; the patients were randomized to receive epoetin alpha as necessary to maintain [Hb] between 120 and 130 g/L (group A) or between 90 and 100 g/L (group B). [Hb] increased for group A (from 112 +/- 9 to 121 +/- 14 g/L, mean +/- SD) and decreased for group B (from 112 +/- 8 to 108 +/- 13 g/L) (P < 0.001, group A versus group B). On an intent-to-treat analysis, the changes in LV mass index for the groups during the 2-yr period were not significantly different (2.5 +/- 20 g/m(2) for group A versus 4.5 +/- 20 g/m(2) for group B, P = NS). There was no significant difference between the groups in 2-yr mean unadjusted systolic BP (141 +/- 14 versus 138 +/- 13 mmHg) or diastolic BP (80 +/- 6 versus 79 +/- 7 mmHg). The decline in renal function in 2 yr, as assessed with nuclear estimations of GFR, also did not differ significantly between the groups (8 +/- 9 versus 6 +/- 8 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)). In conclusion, maintenance of [Hb] above 120 g/L, compared with 90 to 100 g/L, had similar effects on the LV mass index and did not clearly affect the development or progression of LV hypertrophy. The maintenance of [Hb] above 100 g/L for many patients in group B might have been attributable to the relative preservation of renal function.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 02/2004; 15(1):148-56. · 8.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Icodextrin is a starch-derived, high molecular weight glucose polymer, which has been shown to promote sustained ultrafiltration equivalent to that achieved with hypertonic (3.86%/4.25%) glucose exchanges during prolonged intraperitoneal dwells (up to 16 h). Patients with impaired ultrafiltration, particularly in the settings of acute peritonitis, high transporter status and diabetes mellitus, appear to derive the greatest benefit from icodextrin with respect to augmentation of dialytic fluid removal, amelioration of symptomatic fluid retention and possible prolongation of technique survival. Glycaemic control is also improved by substituting icodextrin for hypertonic glucose exchanges in diabetic patients. Preliminary in vitro and ex vivo studies suggest that icodextrin demonstrates greater peritoneal membrane biocompatibility than glucose-based dialysates, but these findings need to be confirmed by long-term clinical studies. This paper reviews the available clinical evidence pertaining to the safety and efficacy of icodextrin and makes recommendations for its use in peritonal dialysis.
    Nephrology 03/2003; 8(1):1-7. · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients on maintenance dialysis have increased risk for cancer, especially in the kidney and urinary tract. In a retrospective cohort of 831,804 patients starting dialysis during 1980 to 1994 in the United States, Europe, or Australia and New Zealand, standardized incidence ratios (SIR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for kidney and bladder cancers. Risks for cancers of the kidney (SIR 3.6; CI 3.5 to 3.8) and bladder (SIR 1.5; CI 1.4 to 1.6) were increased, relatively more in younger than older patients and more in female patients (kidney: SIR 4.6, CI 4.3 to 4.9; bladder: SIR 2.7, CI 2.4 to 2.9) than male patients (kidney: SIR 3.2, CI 3.0 to 3.4; bladder: SIR 1.3, CI 1.2 to 1.3). SIR for kidney cancer were raised in all categories of primary renal disease, and for bladder cancer in all but diabetes and familial, hereditary diseases. Notably high SIR occurred in toxic nephropathies (chiefly analgesic nephropathy) and miscellaneous conditions (a category that includes Balkan nephropathy), the excess of kidney cancer in these conditions being urothelial in origin. SIR for kidney cancer rose significantly, and those for bladder cancer fell (not reaching significance) with time on dialysis. There was no association with type of dialysis. The pattern of increased risk for renal parenchymal cancer in dialysis patients is consistent with causation through acquired renal cystic disease and of urothelial cancers of the kidney and bladder with the carcinogenic effects of certain primary renal diseases.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 02/2003; 14(1):197-207. · 8.99 Impact Factor
  • J R Chapman, A G Sheil, A P Disney
    Transplantation Proceedings 01/2001; 33(1-2):1830-1. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine shoulder appearances at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in long-term dialysis recipients. Twenty-two chronic dialysis recipients underwent 1.0-T MR imaging with a combination of T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted sequences. Rotator cuff tendon thickening was graded as present or absent by a musculoskeletal radiologist, who also measured the supraspinatus and subscapularis tendon thicknesses with electronic calipers. The long-axis dimension and location of focal osseous lesions, in addition to their T1, T2, and T2* signal intensities, were noted. Supraspinatus (n = 9) and subscapularis (n = 10) tendon thickening was frequently observed. Six (27%) of the 22 patients had combined thickening of the supraspinatus and subscapularis tendons without substantial involvement of the infraspinatus or teres minor tendons. These patients had undergone dialysis longer (median, 19.2 years; range, 16.3-22.8 years) than had the other patients (median, 11.7 years; range, 5.8-19.3 years; P: =.004). The 29 intraosseous lesions had high, intermediate, and low T2 signal intensity in six (21%), nine (31%), and 14 (48%) instances, respectively. Supraspinatus and/or subscapularis tendon thickening is common in chronic dialysis recipients. Bone lesions in such patients are of variable T2 signal intensity and usually subchondral or adjacent to the greater tuberosity.
    Radiology 12/2000; 217(2):539-43. · 6.34 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
178.58 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1990–2010
    • The Queen Elizabeth Hospital
      Tarndarnya, South Australia, Australia
  • 1999
    • John Hunter Hospital
      New Lambton, New South Wales, Australia
    • Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham
      Birmingham, England, United Kingdom
  • 1998
    • University of Adelaide
      • Discipline of Medicine
      Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  • 1995
    • Nepean Hospital
      Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • 1994
    • University of Sydney
      Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    • Royal North Shore Hospital
      Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • 1987
    • Tabor Adelaide
      Unley, South Australia, Australia