Simon P Kelly

City College of New York, New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (45)189.92 Total impact

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    Simon P. Kelly, Redmond G. O'Connell
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    ABSTRACT: In the last two decades, animal neurophysiology research has made great strides towards explaining how the brain can enable adaptive action in the face of noisy sensory information. In particular, this work has identified neural signals that perform the role of a 'decision variable' which integrates sensory information in favor of a particular outcome up to an action-triggering threshold, consistent with long-standing predictions from mathematical psychology. This has provoked an intensive search for similar neural processes at work in the human brain. In this paper we review the progress that has been made in tracing the dynamics of perceptual decision formation in humans using functional imaging and electrophysiology. We highlight some of the limitations that non-invasive recording techniques place on our ability to make definitive judgments regarding the role that specific signals play in decision making. Finally, we provide an overview of our own work in this area which has focussed on two perceptual tasks – intensity change detection and motion discrimination – performed under continuous-monitoring conditions, and highlight the insights gained thus far. We show that through simple paradigm considerations such as avoiding sudden intensity transients at evidence onset, a neural instantiation of the theoretical decision variable can be directly traced in the form of a centro-parietal positivity (CPP) in the standard event-related potential (ERP). We recapitulate evidence for the domain-general nature of the CPP process, being divorced from the sensory and motor requirements of the task, and re-plot data of both tasks highlighting this aspect as well as its relationship to decision outcome and reaction time. We discuss the implications of these findings for mechanistically principled research on normal and abnormal decision making in humans.
    Journal of Physiology-Paris 01/2014; · 0.82 Impact Factor
  • Simon P. Kelly, Redmond G. O’Connell
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    ABSTRACT: In the last two decades, animal neurophysiology research has made great strides towards explaining how the brain can enable adaptive action in the face of noisy sensory information. In particular, this work has identified neural signals that perform the role of a ‘decision variable’ which integrates sensory information in favour of a particular outcome up to an action-triggering threshold, consistent with long-standing predictions from mathematical psychology. This has provoked an intensive search for similar neural processes at work in the human brain. In this paper we review the progress that has been made in tracing the dynamics of perceptual decision formation in humans using functional imaging and electrophysiology. We highlight some of the limitations that non-invasive recording techniques place on our ability to make definitive judgments regarding the role that specific signals play in decision making. Finally, we provide an overview of our own work in this area which has focussed on two perceptual tasks - intensity change detection and motion discrimination - performed under continuous-monitoring conditions, and highlight the insights gained thus far. We show that through simple paradigm considerations such as avoiding sudden intensity transients at evidence onset, a neural instantiation of the theoretical decision variable can be directly traced in the form of a centro-parietal positivity (CPP) in the standard event-related potential (ERP). We recapitulate evidence for the domain-general nature of the CPP process, being divorced from the sensory and motor requirements of the task, and re-plot data of both tasks highlighting this aspect as well as its relationship to decision outcome and reaction time. We discuss the implications of these findings for mechanistically principled research on normal and abnormal decision making in humans.
    Journal of Physiology-Paris 01/2014; · 0.82 Impact Factor
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    Simon P Kelly, Redmond G O'Connell
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    ABSTRACT: We frequently need to make timely decisions based on sensory evidence that is weak, ambiguous, or noisy resulting from conditions in the external environment (e.g., a cluttered visual scene) or within the brain itself (e.g., inattention, neural noise). Here we examine how externally and internally driven variations in the quality of sensory evidence affect the build-to-threshold dynamics of a supramodal "decision variable" signal and, hence, the timing and accuracy of decision reports in humans. Observers performed a continuous-monitoring version of the prototypical two-alternative dot-motion discrimination task, which is known to strongly benefit from sequential sampling and temporal accumulation of evidence. A centroparietal positive potential (CPP), which we previously established as a supramodal decision signal based on its invariance to motor or sensory parameters, exhibited two key identifying properties associated with the "decision variable" long described in sequential sampling models: (1) its buildup rate systematically scaled with sensory evidence strength across four levels of motion coherence, consistent with temporal integration; and (2) its amplitude reached a stereotyped level at the moment of perceptual report executions, consistent with a boundary-crossing stopping criterion. The buildup rate of the CPP also strongly predicted reaction time within coherence levels (i.e., independent of physical evidence strength), and this endogenous variation was linked with attentional fluctuations indexed by the level of parieto-occipital α-band activity preceding target onset. In tandem with the CPP, build-to-threshold dynamics were also observed in an effector-selective motor preparation signal; however, the buildup of this motor-specific process significantly lagged that of the supramodal process.
    Journal of Neuroscience 12/2013; 33(50):19434-19441. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Here we summarize the points raised in our dialogue with Ales and colleagues on the cortical generators of the early visual evoked potential (VEP), and offer observations on the results of additional simulations that were run in response to our original comment. For small stimuli placed at locations in the upper and lower visual field for which the human VEP has been well characterized, simulated scalp projections of each of the visual areas V1, V2 and V3 invert in polarity. However, the empirically measured, earliest VEP component, "C1," matches the simulated V1 generators in terms of polarity and topography, but not the simulated V2 and V3 generators. We thus conclude that, 1) consistent with the title of Ales et al (2010a), polarity inversion on its own is not a sufficient criterion for inferring neuroelectric sources in primary visual cortex; but 2) inconsistent with additional claims made in Ales et al (2010a), the simulated topographies provide additional evidence for - not against - the tenet that the C1 component is generated in V1.
    NeuroImage 06/2013; · 6.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) is an electroencephalographic response to flickering stimuli generated partly in primary visual area V1. The typical 'cruciform' geometry and retinotopic organization of V1 is such that certain neighboring visual regions project to neighboring cortical regions of opposite orientation. Here, we explored ways to exploit this organization in order to boost scalp SSVEP amplitude via oscillatory summation. Approach. We manipulated flicker-phase offsets among angular segments of a large annular stimulus in three ways, and compared the resultant SSVEP power to a conventional condition with no temporal phase offsets. (1) We divided the annulus into standard octants for all subjects, and flickered upper horizontal octants with opposite temporal phase to the lower horizontal ones, and left vertical octants opposite to the right vertical ones; (2) we individually adjusted the boundaries between the eight contiguous segments of the standard octants condition to coincide with cruciform-consistent, early-latency topographical shifts in pattern-pulse multifocal visual-evoked potentials (PPMVEP) derived for each of 32 equal-sized segments; (3) we assigned phase offsets to stimulus segments following an automatic algorithm based on the relative amplitudes of vertically- and horizontally-oriented PPMVEP components. Main results. The three flicker-phase manipulations resulted in a significant enhancement of normalized SSVEP power of (1) 202%, (2) 383%, and (3) 300%, respectively. Significance. We have thus demonstrated a means to obtain more reliable measures of visual evoked activity purely through consideration of cortical geometry. This principle stands to impact both basic and clinical research using SSVEPs.
    Journal of Neural Engineering 04/2013; 10(3):036003. · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In theoretical accounts of perceptual decision-making, a decision variable integrates noisy sensory evidence and determines action through a boundary-crossing criterion. Signals bearing these very properties have been characterized in single neurons in monkeys, but have yet to be directly identified in humans. Using a gradual target detection task, we isolated a freely evolving decision variable signal in human subjects that exhibited every aspect of the dynamics observed in its single-neuron counterparts. This signal could be continuously tracked in parallel with fully dissociable sensory encoding and motor preparation signals, and could be systematically perturbed mid-flight during decision formation. Furthermore, we found that the signal was completely domain general: it exhibited the same decision-predictive dynamics regardless of sensory modality and stimulus features and tracked cumulative evidence even in the absence of overt action. These findings provide a uniquely clear view on the neural determinants of simple perceptual decisions in humans.
    Nature Neuroscience 10/2012; · 15.25 Impact Factor
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    E C Lalor, S P Kelly, J J Foxe
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    ABSTRACT: The VESPA (visual-evoked spread spectrum analysis) method derives an impulse response function of the visual system from scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) data using the controlled modulation of some feature of a visual stimulus. Recent research using VESPA responses to modulations of stimulus contrast has provided new insights into both early visual attention mechanisms and the specificity of visual-processing deficits in schizophrenia. To allow a fuller interpretation of these and future findings, it is necessary to further characterize the VESPA in terms of its underlying cortical generators. To that end, we here examine spatio-temporal variations in the components of the VESPA as a function of stimulus location. We found that the first two VESPA components (C1/P1) each have a posterior dorsal midline focus and reverse in polarity across the horizontal meridian, consistent with retinotopic projections to calcarine cortex (V1) for the stimulus locations tested. Furthermore, the focal scalp topography of the VESPA was strikingly constant across the entire C1-P1 timeframe (50-120 ms) for each stimulus location, with negligible global scalp activity visible at the zero-crossing dividing the two. This indicates a common focal source underpinning both components, which was further supported by a significant correlation between C1 and P1 amplitudes across subjects (r=0.54; p<0.05). These results, along with factors implicit in the method of derivation of the contrast-VESPA, lead us to conclude that these responses are dominated by activity from striate cortex. We discuss the implications of this finding for previous and future research using the VESPA.
    Neuroscience 06/2012; 218:226-34. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The VESPA (visual-evoked spread spectrum analysis) method estimates the impulse response of the visual system using a continuously varying stimulus. It has been used recently to address both basic cognitive and neurophysiologic questions as well as those surrounding clinical populations. Although the components of the average VESPA response are highly reminiscent of the early components of the visual-evoked potential (VEP) when measured over midline occipital locations, the two responses are acquired in different ways and, thus, they cannot be regarded as being equivalent. To further characterize the relationship between the VESPA and the VEP and the generative mechanisms underlying them, we recorded EEG from 31 subjects in response to checkerboard-based VEP and VESPA stimuli. We found that, across subjects, the amplitudes of the VEP C1 component and the VESPA C1 component were highly correlated, whereas the VEP P1 and the VESPA P1 bore no statistical relationship. Furthermore, we found that C1 and P1 amplitudes were significantly correlated in the VESPA but not in the VEP. We believe these findings point to the presence of common generators underlying the VESPA C1 and the VEP C1. We argue further that the VESPA P1, in light of its strong relationship to the VESPA C1, likely reflects further activation of the same cortical generators. Given the lack of correlation between the VEP P1 and each of these three other components, it is likely that the underlying generators of this particular component are more varied and widespread, as suggested previously. We discuss the implications of these relationships for basic and clinical research using the VESPA and for the assessment of additive-evoked versus phase-reset contributions to the VEP.
    Experimental Brain Research 05/2012; 220(2):191-9. · 2.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, a forward-model simulation study demonstrated that the upper and lower visual field projections to extrastriate visual cortical areas V2 and V3 have polarity-inverted electrical scalp projections, a property famously associated with potentials generated in primary visual cortex (V1) (Ales et al., 2010a). The authors use this finding, along with other findings from fMRI-constrained source modeling, to argue that the initial component "C1" of the human visual evoked potential may not be generated in V1 as has been widely believed, but may instead come from V2/V3. Here, we examine the validity of this claim with respect to the full set of anatomical and electrophysiological factors comprising the unabridged "cruciform" model linking C1 to V1. We find that the simulations in their current form do not present a valid test of the model, nor are their results inconsistent with it. We also review non-human primate neurophysiology findings that support the C1-V1 principle, and that can and should be taken into account in assessing the validity of constrained source models of human EEG in general.
    NeuroImage 04/2012; · 6.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Caffeine and L-theanine, both naturally occurring in tea, affect the ability to make rapid phasic deployments of attention to locations in space as reflected in behavioural performance and alpha-band oscillatory brain activity (8-14 Hz). However, surprisingly little is known about how these compounds affect an aspect of attention that has been more popularly associated with tea, namely vigilant attention: the ability to maintain focus on monotonous tasks over protracted time-periods. Twenty-seven participants performed the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) over a two-hour session on each of four days, on which they were administered caffeine (50 mg), theanine (100 mg), the combination, or placebo in a double-blind, randomized, cross-over fashion. Concurrently, we recorded oscillatory brain activity through high-density electroencephalography (EEG). We asked whether either compound alone, or both in combination, would affect performance of the task in terms of reduced error rates over time, and whether changes in alpha-band activity would show a relationship to such changes in performance. When treated with placebo, participants showed a rise in error rates, a pattern that is commonly observed with increasing time-on-task, whereas after caffeine and theanine ingestion, error rates were significantly reduced. The combined treatment did not confer any additional benefits over either compound alone, suggesting that the individual compounds may confer maximal benefits at the dosages employed. Alpha-band oscillatory activity was significantly reduced on ingestion of caffeine, particularly in the first hour. This effect was not changed by addition of theanine in the combined treatment. Theanine alone did not affect alpha-band activity.
    Neuropharmacology 02/2012; 62(7):2320-7. · 4.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Oscillatory entrainment mechanisms are invoked during attentional processing of rhythmically occurring stimuli, whereby their phase alignment regulates the excitability state of neurons coding for anticipated inputs. These mechanisms have been examined in the delta band (1-3 Hz), where entrainment frequency matches the stimulation rate. Here, we investigated entrainment for subdelta rhythmic stimulation, recording from intracranial electrodes over human auditory cortex during an intersensory audiovisual task. Audiovisual stimuli were presented at 0.67 Hz while participants detected targets within one sensory stream and ignored the other. It was found that entrainment operated at twice the stimulation rate (1.33 Hz), and this was reflected by higher amplitude values in the FFT spectrum, cyclic modulation of alpha-amplitude, and phase-amplitude coupling between delta phase and alpha power. In addition, we found that alpha-amplitude was relatively increased in auditory cortex coincident with to-be-ignored auditory stimuli during attention to vision. Thus, the data suggest that entrainment mechanisms operate within a delimited passband such that for subdelta task rhythms, oscillatory harmonics are invoked. The phase of these delta-entrained oscillations modulates alpha-band power. This may in turn increase or decrease responsiveness to relevant and irrelevant stimuli, respectively.
    Journal of Neuroscience 12/2011; 31(50):18556-67. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The neural processing of biological motion (BM) is of profound experimental interest since it is often through the movement of another that we interpret their immediate intentions. Neuroimaging points to a specialized cortical network for processing biological motion. Here, high-density electrical mapping and source-analysis techniques were employed to interrogate the timing of information processing across this network. Participants viewed point-light-displays depicting standard body movements (e.g. jumping), while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded and compared to ERPs to scrambled motion control stimuli. In a pair of experiments, three major phases of BM-specific processing were identified: 1) The earliest phase of BM-sensitive modulation was characterized by a positive shift of the ERP between 100 and 200 ms after stimulus onset. This modulation was observed exclusively over the right hemisphere and source-analysis suggested a likely generator in close proximity to regions associated with general motion processing (KO/hMT). 2) The second phase of BM-sensitivity occurred from 200 to 350 ms, characterized by a robust negative-going ERP modulation over posterior middle temporal regions bilaterally. Source-analysis pointed to bilateral generators at or near the posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS). 3) A third phase of processing was evident only in our second experiment, where participants actively attended the BM aspect of the stimuli, and was manifest as a centro-parietal positive ERP deflection, likely related to later cognitive processes. These results point to very early sensory registration of biological motion, and highlight the interactive role of the posterior STS in analyzing the movements of other living organisms.
    NeuroImage 01/2011; 56(1):373-83. · 6.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The N1 component of the auditory evoked potential (AEP) is a robust and easily recorded metric of auditory sensory-perceptual processing. In patients with schizophrenia, a diminution in the amplitude of this component is a near-ubiquitous finding. A pair of recent studies has also shown this N1 deficit in first-degree relatives of schizophrenia probands, suggesting that the deficit may be linked to the underlying genetic risk of the disease rather than to the disease state itself. However, in both these studies, a significant proportion of the relatives had other psychiatric conditions. As such, although the N1 deficit represents an intriguing candidate endophenotype for schizophrenia, it remains to be shown whether it is present in a group of clinically unaffected first-degree relatives. In addition to testing first-degree relatives, we also sought to replicate the N1 deficit in a group of first-episode patients and in a group of chronic schizophrenia probands. Subject groups consisted of 35 patients with schizophrenia, 30 unaffected first-degree relatives, 13 first-episode patients, and 22 healthy controls. Subjects sat in a dimly lit room and listened to a series of simple 1,000-Hz tones, indicating with a button press whenever they heard a deviant tone (1,500 Hz; 17% probability), while the AEP was recorded from 72 scalp electrodes. Both chronic and first-episode patients showed clear N1 amplitude decrements relative to healthy control subjects. Crucially, unaffected first-degree relatives also showed a clear N1 deficit. This study provides further support for the proposal that the auditory N1 deficit in schizophrenia is linked to the underlying genetic risk of developing this disorder. In light of recent studies, these results point to the N1 deficit as an endophenotypic marker for schizophrenia. The potential future utility of this metric as one element of a multivariate endophenotype is discussed.
    European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience 12/2010; 261(5):331-9. · 2.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: When preparing to make a saccadic eye movement in a cued direction, perception of stimuli at the target location is enhanced, just as it is when attention is covertly deployed there. Accordingly, the timing and anatomical sources of preparatory brain activity accompanying shifts of covert attention and saccade preparation tend to exhibit a large degree of overlap. However, there is evidence that preparatory processes are modulated by the foreknowledge of visual distractor competition during covert attention, and it is unknown whether eye movement preparation undergoes equivalent modulation. Here we examine preparatory processes in the electroencephalogram of human participants during four blocked versions of a spatial cueing task, requiring either covert detection or saccade execution, and either containing a distractor or not. As in previous work, a typical pattern of spatially selective occipital, parietal and frontal activity was seen in all task versions. However, whereas distractor presence called on an enhancement of spatially selective visual cortical modulation during covert attention, it instead called on increased activity over frontomedial oculomotor areas in the case of overt saccade preparation. We conclude that, although advance orienting signals may be similar in character during overt and covert conditions, the pattern by which these signals are modulated to ameliorate the behavioral costs of distractor competition is highly distinct, pointing to a degree of separability between the overt and covert systems.
    European Journal of Neuroscience 05/2010; 31(9):1690-700. · 3.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Attending to a specific spatial location modulates responsivity of neurons with receptive fields processing that part of the environment. A major outstanding question is whether attentional modulation operates differently for the foveal (central) representation of the visual field than it does for the periphery. Indeed, recent animal electrophysiological recordings suggest that attention differentially affects spatial integration for central and peripheral receptive fields in primary visual cortex. In human electroencephalographic recordings, spatial attention to peripheral locations robustly modulates activity in early visual regions, but it has been claimed that this mechanism does not operate in foveal vision. Here, however, we show clear early attentional modulation of foveal stimulation with the same timing and cortical sources as seen for peripheral stimuli, demonstrating that attentional gain control operates similarly across the entire field of view. These results imply that covertly attending away from the center of gaze, which is a common paradigm in behavioral and electrophysiological studies of attention, results in a precisely timed push-pull mechanism. While the amplitude of the initial response to stimulation at attended peripheral locations is significantly increased beginning at 80 ms, the amplitude of the response to foveal stimulation begins to be attenuated.
    Journal of Neuroscience 03/2010; 30(13):4547-51. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cueing relevant spatial locations in advance of a visual target results in modulated processing of that target as a consequence of anticipatory attentional deployment, the neural signatures of which remain to be fully elucidated. A set of electrophysiological processes has been established as candidate markers of the invocation and maintenance of attentional bias in humans. These include spatially-selective event-related potential (ERP) components over the lateral parietal (around 200-300 ms post-cue), frontal (300-500 ms) and ventral visual (> 500 ms) cortex, as well as oscillatory amplitude changes in the alpha band (8-14 Hz). Here, we interrogated the roles played by these anticipatory processes in attentional orienting by testing for links with subsequent behavioral performance. We found that both target discriminability (d') and reaction times were significantly predicted on a trial-by-trial basis by lateralization of alpha-band amplitude in the 500 ms preceding the target, with improved speed and accuracy resulting from a greater relative decrease in alpha over the contralateral visual cortex. Reaction time was also predicted by a late posterior contralateral positivity in the broad-band ERP in the same time period, but this did not influence d'. In a further analysis we sought to identify the control signals involved in generating the anticipatory bias, by testing earlier broad-band ERP amplitude for covariation with alpha lateralization. We found that stronger alpha biasing was associated with a greater bilateral frontal positivity at approximately 390 ms but not with differential amplitude across hemispheres in any time period. Thus, during the establishment of an anticipatory spatial bias, while the expected target location is strongly encoded in lateralized activity in parietal and frontal areas, a distinct non-spatial control process seems to regulate the strength of the bias.
    European Journal of Neuroscience 11/2009; 30(11):2224-34. · 3.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Etiological commonalities are apparent between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. For example, it is becoming clear that both populations show similar electrophysiological deficits in the auditory domain. Recent studies have also shown robust visual sensory processing deficits in patients with schizophrenia using the event-related potential technique, but this has not been formally tested in those with bipolar disorder. Our goal here was to assess whether early visual sensory processing in patients with bipolar disorder, as indexed by decreased amplitude of the P1 component of the visual evoked potential (VEP), would show a similar deficit to that seen in those with schizophrenia. Since the P1 deficit has already been established as an endophenotype in schizophrenia, a finding of commonality between disorders would raise the possibility that it represents a measure of common genetic liability. We visually presented isolated-check stimuli to euthymic patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and age-matched healthy controls within a simple go/no-go task and recorded VEPs using high-density (72-channel) electroencephalography. The P1 VEP amplitude was substantially reduced in patients with bipolar disorder, with an effect size of f = 0.56 (large according to Cohen's criteria). Our sample size was relatively small and as such, did not allow for an examination of potential relations between the physiologic measures and clinical measures. This reduction in P1 amplitude among patients with bipolar disorder represents a dysfunction in early visual processing that is highly similar to that found repeatedly in patients with schizophrenia and their healthy first-degree relatives. Since the P1 deficit has been related to susceptibility genes for schizophrenia, our results raise the possibility that the deficit may in fact be more broadly related to the development of psychosis and that it merits further investigation as a candidate endophenotype for bipolar disorder.
    Journal of psychiatry & neuroscience: JPN 11/2009; 34(6):459-64. · 6.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The extent to which changes in brain activity can foreshadow human error is uncertain yet has important theoretical and practical implications. The present study examined the temporal dynamics of electrocortical signals preceding a lapse of sustained attention. Twenty-one participants performed a continuous temporal expectancy task, which involved continuously monitoring a stream of regularly alternating patterned stimuli to detect a rarely occurring target stimulus whose duration was 40% longer. The stimulus stream flickered at a rate of 25 Hz to elicit a steady-state visual-evoked potential (SSVEP), which served as a continuous measure of basic visual processing. Increasing activity in the alpha band (8-14 Hz) was found beginning approximately 20 s before a missed target. This was followed by decreases in the amplitude of two event-related components over a short pretarget time frame: the frontal P3 (3-4 s) and contingent-negative variation (during the target interval). In contrast, SSVEP amplitude before hits and misses was closely matched, suggesting that the efficacy of ongoing basic visual processing was unaffected. Our results show that the specific neural signatures of attentional lapses are registered in the EEG up to 20 s before an error.
    Journal of Neuroscience 08/2009; 29(26):8604-11. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Synesthesia is a condition where stimulation of a single sensory modality or processing stream elicits an idiosyncratic, yet reliable perception in one or more other modalities or streams. Various models have been proposed to explain synesthesia, which have in common aberrant cross-activation of one cortical area by another. This has been observed directly in cases of linguistic-color synesthesia as cross-activation of the 'color area', V4, by stimulation of the grapheme area. The underlying neural substrates that mediate cross-activations in synesthesia are not well understood, however. In addition, the overall integrity of the visual system has never been assessed and it is not known whether wider differences in sensory-perceptual processing are associated with the condition. To assess whether fundamental differences in perceptual processing exist in synesthesia, we utilised high-density 128-channel electroencephalography (EEG) to measure sensory-perceptual processing using stimuli that differentially bias activation of the magnocellular and parvocellular pathways of the visual system. High and low spatial frequency gratings and luminance-contrast squares were presented to 15 synesthetes and 15 controls. We report, for the first time, early sensory-perceptual differences in synesthetes relative to non-synesthete controls in response to simple stimuli that do not elicit synesthetic color experiences. The differences are manifested in the early sensory components of the visual evoked potential (VEP) to stimuli that bias both magnocellular and parvocellular responses, but are opposite in direction, suggesting a differential effect on these two pathways. We discuss our results with reference to widespread connectivity differences as a broader phenotype of synesthesia.
    NeuroImage 08/2008; 43(3):605-13. · 6.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent neuropharmacological research has suggested that certain constituents of tea may have modulatory effects on brain state. The bulk of this research has focused on either L-theanine or caffeine ingested alone (mostly the latter) and has been limited to behavioral testing, subjective rating, or neurophysiological assessments during resting. Here, we investigated the effects of both L-theanine and caffeine, ingested separately or together, on behavioral and electrophysiological indices of tonic (background) and phasic (event-related) visuospatial attentional deployment. Subjects underwent 4 d of testing, ingesting either placebo, 100 mg of L-theanine, 50 mg of caffeine, or these treatments combined. The task involved cued shifts of attention to the left or right visual hemifield in anticipation of an imperative stimulus requiring discrimination. In addition to behavioral measures, we examined overall, tonic attentional focus as well as phasic, cue-dependent anticipatory attentional biasing, as indexed by scalp-recorded alpha-band (8-14 Hz) activity. We found an increase in hit rate and target discriminability (d') for the combined treatment relative to placebo, and an increase in d' but not hit rate for caffeine alone, whereas no effects were detected for L-theanine alone. Electrophysiological results did not show increased differential biasing in phasic alpha across hemifields but showed lower overall tonic alpha power in the combined treatment, similar to previous findings at a larger dosage of L-theanine alone. This may signify a more generalized tonic deployment of attentional resources to the visual modality and may underlie the facilitated behavioral performance on the combined ingestion of these 2 major constituents of tea.
    Journal of Nutrition 08/2008; 138(8):1572S-1577S. · 4.20 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
189.92 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2013
    • City College of New York
      • Department of Biomedical Engineering
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2009–2013
    • CUNY Graduate Center
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2010–2012
    • City University of New York - York College
      New York City, New York, United States
    • Columbia University
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2007–2012
    • Nathan Kline Institute
      Orangeburg, New York, United States
  • 2004–2012
    • Trinity College Dublin
      • School of Psychology
      Dublin, L, Ireland
  • 2008–2009
    • St. Vincent Hospital
      Green Bay, Wisconsin, United States
    • St. Vincent’s Hospital, Fairview
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
  • 2006–2008
    • Saint Vincent Hospital
      Worcester, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2003–2005
    • University College Dublin
      • School of Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering
      Dublin, L, Ireland