Franz R Eberli

Triemli City Hospital, Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland

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Publications (91)837.58 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate outcomes of patients treated with prasugrel or clopidogrel after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in a nationwide acute coronary syndrome (ACS) registry. Prasugrel was found to be superior to clopidogrel in a randomized trial of ACS patients undergoing PCI. However, little is known about its efficacy in everyday practice. All ACS patients enrolled in the Acute Myocardial Infarction in Switzerland (AMIS)-Plus registry undergoing PCI and being treated with a thienopyridine P2Y12 inhibitor between January 2010-December 2013 were included in this analysis. Patients were stratified according to treatment with prasugrel or clopidogrel and outcomes were compared using propensity score matching. The primary endpoint was a composite of death, recurrent infarction and stroke at hospital discharge. Out of 7621 patients, 2891 received prasugrel (38%) and 4730 received clopidogrel (62%). Independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were age, Killip class >2, STEMI, Charlson comorbidity index >1, and resuscitation prior to admission. After propensity score matching (2301 patients per group), the primary endpoint was significantly lower in prasugrel-treated patients (3.0% vs 4.3%; p=0.022) while bleeding events were more frequent (4.1% vs 3.0%; p=0.048). In-hospital mortality was significantly reduced (1.8% vs 3.1%; p=0.004), but no significant differences were observed in rates of recurrent infarction (0.8% vs 0.7%; p=1.00) or stroke (0.5% vs 0.6%; p=0.85). In a predefined subset of matched patients with one-year follow-up (n=1226), mortality between discharge and one year was not significantly reduced in prasugrel-treated patients (1.3% vs 1.9%, p=0.38). In everyday practice in Switzerland, prasugrel is predominantly used in younger patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. A propensity score-matched analysis suggests a mortality benefit from prasugrel compared with clopidogrel in these patients. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.
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    ABSTRACT: -Biodegradable-polymer drug-eluting stents (BP-DES) were developed to be as effective as second-generation durable-polymer drug-eluting stents (DP-DES) and as safe >1 year as bare-metal stents (BMS). Thus, very late stent thrombosis (VLST) attributable to durable polymers should no longer appear. -To address these early and late aspects, 2291 patients presenting with acute or stable coronary disease needing stents ≥3.0 mm in diameter between April 2010 and May 2012 were randomly assigned to biolimus-A9-eluting BP-DES, second-generation everolimus-eluting DP-DES, or thin-strut silicon-carbide-coated BMS in 8 European centers. All patients were treated with aspirin and risk-adjusted doses of prasugrel. The primary end point was combined cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and clinically indicated target-vessel revascularization within 2 years. The combined secondary safety end point was a composite of VLST, myocardial infarction, and cardiac death. The cumulative incidence of the primary end point was 7.6% with BP-DES, 6.8% with DP-DES, and 12.7% with BMS. By intention-to-treat BP-DES were noninferior (predefined margin, 3.80%) compared with DP-DES (absolute risk difference, 0.78%; -1.93% to 3.50%; P for noninferiority 0.042; per protocol P=0.09) and superior to BMS (absolute risk difference, -5.16; -8.32 to -2.01; P=0.0011). The 3 stent groups did not differ in the combined safety end point, with no decrease in events >1 year, particularly VLST with BP-DES. -In large vessel stenting, BP-DES appeared barely noninferior compared with DP-DES and more effective than thin-strut BMS, but without evidence for better safety nor lower VLST rates >1 year. Findings challenge the concept that durable polymers are key in VLST formation. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01166685.
    Circulation 11/2014; 131(1). DOI:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.013520 · 14.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Refinements in stent design affecting strut thickness, surface polymer, and drug release have improved clinical outcomes of drug-eluting stents. We aimed to compare the safety and efficacy of a novel, ultrathin strut cobalt-chromium stent releasing sirolimus from a biodegradable polymer with a thin strut durable polymer everolimus-eluting stent. Methods We did a randomised, single-blind, non-inferiority trial with minimum exclusion criteria at nine hospitals in Switzerland. We randomly assigned (1:1) patients aged 18 years or older with chronic stable coronary artery disease or acute coronary syndromes undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention to treatment with biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents or durable polymer everolimus-eluting stents. Randomisation was via a central web-based system and stratified by centre and presence of ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. Patients and outcome assessors were masked to treatment allocation, but treating physicians were not. The primary endpoint, target lesion failure, was a composite of cardiac death, target vessel myocardial infarction, and clinically-indicated target lesion revascularisation at 12 months. A margin of 3·5% was defined for non-inferiority of the biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent compared with the durable polymer everolimus-eluting stent. Analysis was by intention to treat. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01443104. Findings Between Feb 24, 2012, and May 22, 2013, we randomly assigned 2119 patients with 3139 lesions to treatment with sirolimus-eluting stents (1063 patients, 1594 lesions) or everolimus-eluting stents (1056 patients, 1545 lesions). 407 (19%) patients presented with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Target lesion failure with biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents (69 cases; 6·5%) was non-inferior to durable polymer everolimus-eluting stents (70 cases; 6·6%) at 12 months (absolute risk difference −0·14%, upper limit of one-sided 95% CI 1·97%, p for non-inferiority <0·0004). No significant differences were noted in rates of definite stent thrombosis (9 [0·9%] vs 4 [0·4%], rate ratio [RR] 2·26, 95% CI 0·70–7·33, p=0·16). In pre-specified stratified analyses of the primary endpoint, biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents were associated with improved outcome compared with durable polymer everolimus-eluting stents in the subgroup of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (7 [3·3%] vs 17 [8·7%], RR 0·38, 95% CI 0·16–0·91, p=0·024, p for interaction=0·014). Interpretation In a patient population with minimum exclusion criteria and high adherence to dual antiplatelet therapy, biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents were non-inferior to durable polymer everolimus-eluting stents for the combined safety and efficacy outcome target lesion failure at 12 months. The noted benefit in the subgroup of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction needs further study. Funding Clinical Trials Unit, University of Bern, and Biotronik, Bülach, Switzerland.
    The Lancet 09/2014; DOI:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61038-2 · 39.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: We conducted a pooled post hoc analysis (RESOLUTE All Comers and RESOLUTE International) of patients who had the Resolute® zotarolimus-eluting stent (R-ZES) implanted in revascularised total occlusions (TO) compared with patients treated with R-ZES for non-occluded lesions. Methods and results: Patients were divided into three groups: chronic TO (CTO; n=256), non-chronic TO (n=292), and no occlusion (n=2,941). Clinical and safety outcomes assessed through two years included target lesion failure (TLF: cardiac death, target vessel myocardial infarction, and clinically driven target lesion revascularisation) and Academic Research Consortium definite or probable stent thrombosis. The rate of TLF at two years was not significantly different among patients in the CTO (9.1%), TO (9.8%), and no occlusion (10.4%) groups (log-rank p=0.800); neither were the components of TLF. Definite or probable stent thrombosis occurred more frequently in the TO group (2.8% vs. 1.2% in the CTO and 1.1% in the group with no occlusion, p=0.027). There were 10 late and six very late stent thrombosis events. Conclusions: Apart from a higher rate of stent thrombosis in patients with TO, patients with totally occluded coronary arteries who receive revascularisation with an R-ZES have clinical outcomes comparable to those who receive a similar stent in non-occluded lesions.
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the impact of individual comorbid conditions as well as the weight assignment, predictive properties and discriminating power of the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) on outcome in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). METHODS: A prospective multicentre observational study (AMIS Plus Registry) from 69 Swiss hospitals with 29 620 ACS patients enrolled from 2002 to 2012. The main outcome measures were in-hospital and 1-year follow-up mortality. RESULTS: Of the patients, 27% were female (age 72.1±12.6 years) and 73% were male (64.2±12.9 years). 46.8% had comorbidities and they were less likely to receive guideline-recommended drug therapy and reperfusion. Heart failure (adjusted OR 1.88; 95% CI 1.57 to 2.25), metastatic tumours (OR 2.25; 95% CI 1.60 to 3.19), renal diseases (OR 1.84; 95% CI 1.60 to 2.11) and diabetes (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.19 to 1.54) were strong predictors of in-hospital mortality. In this population, CCI weighted the history of prior myocardial infarction higher (1 instead of -0.4, 95% CI -1.2 to 0.3 points) but heart failure (1 instead of 3.7, 95% CI 2.6 to 4.7) and renal disease (2 instead of 3.5, 95% CI 2.7 to 4.4) lower than the benchmark, where all comorbidities, age and gender were used as predictors. However, the model with CCI and age has an identical discrimination to this benchmark (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves were both 0.76). CONCLUSIONS: Comorbidities greatly influenced clinical presentation, therapies received and the outcome of patients admitted with ACS. Heart failure, diabetes, renal disease or metastatic tumours had a major impact on mortality. CCI seems to be an appropriate prognostic indicator for in-hospital and 1-year outcomes in ACS patients.
    Heart 01/2014; 100:288-294. DOI:10.1136/heartjnl-2013-304588 · 6.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: We examined what type of STEMI patients are more likely to undergo multivessel PCI (MPCI) in a "real-world" setting and whether MPCI leads to worse or better outcomes compared with single-vessel PCI (SPCI) after stratifying patients by risk. Methods and results: Among STEMI patients enrolled in the Swiss AMIS Plus registry between 2005 and 2012 (n=12,000), 4,941 were identified with multivessel disease. We then stratified patients based on MPCI use and their risk. High-risk patients were identified a priori as those with: 1) left main (LM) involvement (lesions, n=263); 2) out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; or 3) Killip class III/IV. Logistic regression models examined for predictors of MPCI use and the association between MPCI and in-hospital mortality. Three thousand eight hundred and thirty-three (77.6%) patients underwent SPCI and 1,108 (22.4%) underwent MPCI. Rates of MPCI were greater among high-risk patients for each of the three categories: 8.6% vs. 5.9% for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (p<0.01); 12.3% vs. 6.2% for Killip III/IV (p<0.001); and 14.5% vs. 2.7% for LM involvement (p<0.001). Overall, in-hospital mortality after MPCI was higher when compared with SPCI (7.3% vs. 4.4%; p<0.001). However, this result was not present when patients were stratified by risk: in-hospital mortality for MPCI vs. SPCI was 2.0% vs. 2.0% (p=1.00) in low-risk patients and 22.2% vs. 21.7% (p=1.00) in high-risk patients. Conclusions: High-risk patients are more likely to undergo MPCI. Furthermore, MPCI does not appear to be associated with higher mortality after stratifying patients based on their risk.
    EuroIntervention: journal of EuroPCR in collaboration with the Working Group on Interventional Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology 12/2013; 9(8):909-15. DOI:10.4244/EIJV9I8A153 · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background: Data on temporal trends in outcomes, gender differences, and adherence to evidence-based therapy (EBT) of diabetic patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are sparse. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data on 3565 diabetic (2412 males and 1153 females) STEMI patients enrolled in the Swiss AMIS Plus registry between 1997 and 2010 and compared in-hospital outcomes and adherence to EBT with the nondiabetic population (n=15,531). Results: In-hospital mortality dramatically decreased in diabetic patients, from 19.9% in 1997 to 9.0% in 2010 (ptrend<0.001) with an age-adjusted decrease of 6% per year of admission. Similar trends were observed for age-adjusted reinfarction (OR 0.86, p<0.001), cardiogenic shock (OR 0.88, p<0.001), as well as death, reinfarction, or stroke (OR 0.92, p<0.001). However, the mortality benefit over time was observed in diabetic males (ptrend=0.006) but not females (ptrend=0.082). In addition, mortality remained twice as high in diabetic patients compared with nondiabetic ones (12.1 vs. 6.1%, p<0.001) and diabetes was identified as independent predictor of mortality (OR 1.23, p=0.022). Within the diabetic cohort, females had higher mortality than males (16.1 vs. 10.2%, p<0.001) and female gender independently predicted in-hospital mortality (OR 1.45, p=0.015). Adherence to EBT significantly improved over time in diabetic patients (ptrend<0.001) but remained inferior – especially in women – to the one of nondiabetic individuals. Conclusions: In-hospital mortality and morbidity of diabetic STEMI patients in Switzerland improved dramatically over time but, compared with nondiabetic counterparts, gaps in outcomes as well as EBT use persisted, especially in women.
    11/2013; DOI:10.1177/2048872613490382
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the importance of vessel size on outcome differences by comparing the effects of drug-eluting stents (DES) versus bare-metal stents (BMS) in women and men with large coronary vessels. All 2314 BASKET-PROVE patients randomized to DES versus BMS were followed for 2years with a primary endpoint of major adverse cardiac events (MACE: cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, target-vessel revascularization). Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the relative risk for women and men, respectively. All comparisons were adjusted for vessel size. Age, risk factors and complexity of coronary artery disease differed between women and men. DES reduced MACE rates at 2years compared to BMS - in women: 4% vs. 15%, p<0.0001 with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.27 (0.15-0.51), and men: 6% vs. 10%, p=0.003 (HR=0.60 (0.43-0.84)), respectively. The association persisted in both women (HR=0.25 (0.13-0.46)) and men (HR=0.60 (0.42-0.84)) following multivariable adjustments. A significant gender-treatment interaction was present (p=0.02). The reduced risk of MACE following DES vs. BMS implantation was present until 6months in both women (HR=0.15 (0.06-0.36)) and men (HR=0.32 (0.17-0.59)) and remained significant until 2years in women (HR=0.36 (0.15-0.87)), but not in men (HR=0.87 (0.49-1.55)). In women and men with similarly sized large coronary arteries, DES reduced 2-year MACE rates compared to BMS, but the significant gender-treatment interaction indicated a greater benefit of DES in women. Thus, factors other than vessel size seem to determine this gender difference.
    International journal of cardiology 09/2013; 169(1). DOI:10.1016/j.ijcard.2013.08.091 · 6.18 Impact Factor
  • David J Kurz, Franz R Eberli
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    ABSTRACT: Medical therapy following percutaneous coronary intervention aims at preventing first, coronary disease progression and its clinical manifestations, and finally, the two main complications of coronary stenting, stent thrombosis and restenosis. Prevention of in-stent restenosis is restricted to local drug delivery in the form of drug eluting stents (DES). Second generation DES have improved their efficacy and safety profile by innovations in drug coating, the polymer drug-delivery system and stent design. The mainstay of stent thrombosis prevention remains dual anti-platelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid and a platelet ADP-receptor blocker, traditionally clopidogrel. Two new drugs, prasugrel and ticagrelor, provide faster, greater, and more consistent platelet inhibition than clopidogrel, and have been shown to be more efficacious in preventing ischemic events after PCI in acute coronary syndrome patients.
    Current Opinion in Pharmacology 02/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.coph.2013.01.011 · 4.23 Impact Factor
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    European Heart Journal 10/2012; 33(20):2551-2567. DOI:10.1093/eurheartj/ehs184 · 14.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives:  The aim of this study was to assess whether transient atrial septal defect (ASD) occlusion and, if required, vasodilator therapy would improve the safety of percutaneous ASD closure in high-risk subsets. Background:  While percutaneous ASD closure is generally considered a low risk intervention, hypertensive and elderly patients may develop pulmonary edema following the procedure because of underlying left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction. Methods:  Fifty-two consecutive patients who underwent successful percutaneous ASD closures were enrolled into a single-center prospective registry. Patients with arterial hypertension and/or >60 years of age (n = 15) were considered at risk for periprocedural pulmonary edema. Those patients were tested for an increase of LV filling pressures during transient ASD occlusion and, if this was the case, treated according to a prespecified algorithm. Clinical and echocardiography data were collected in-hospital and at 6 months follow-up. Results:  Shunt size was comparable in high and standard-risk patients (Qp:Qs 2.1 ± 0.8 vs. 2.1 ± 0.7, P = 0.82). High-risk patients had more often pulmonary hypertension (58% vs. 14%, P < 0.05) and were more frequently symptomatic. Among them, 4/15 (27%) demonstrated a significant rise of left-sided filling pressures during transient ASD balloon occlusion and underwent pharmacologic preconditioning prior to ASD closure. None of them developed periprocedural pulmonary edema. At follow-up, patients were less symptomatic (Pre: NYHA II n = 15, NYHA III n = 9; Post: NYHA II n = 15, NYHA III n = 0; P = 0.02) and right ventricular size decreased from 23 ± 5 cm(2) to 17 ± 5 cm(2) , P < 0.05. Conclusion:  Transient ASD occlusion and, if required, pharmacologic preconditioning prior to percutaneous closure may prevent periprocedural pulmonary edema in high-risk patients. (J Interven Cardiol 2012;25:505-512).
    Journal of Interventional Cardiology 06/2012; 25(5):505-12. DOI:10.1111/j.1540-8183.2012.00747.x · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Late acquired incomplete stent apposition (ISA) is more common after drug-eluting stent (DES) than bare metal stent (BMS) implantation and has been associated with vascular hypersensitivity and stent thrombosis (ST). We investigated the impact of incidentally discovered ISA as assessed by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) 8 months after DES implantation on the long-term clinical outcome. A total of 194 patients with 221 lesions were prospectively followed through 5 years. At 8 months, IVUS showed evidence of ISA among 37 patients with 39 lesions (18%) (mean ISA(max) 4.7 ± 5.0 mm(2)), whereas no ISA was observed among 157 patients with 182 lesions. Incomplete stent apposition was more prevalent among segments treated with sirolimus-eluting (n = 103) than paclitaxel-eluting stents (n = 118) (27 vs. 9%, P = 0.001). Between IVUS investigation at the 8-month and 5-year follow-up, major adverse cardiac events occurred more frequently in patients with (18.9%, n = 7) than without ISA (7.0%, n = 11) (HR = 2.71, 95% CI: 1.05-6.96, P = 0.031). While there were no differences with respect to death, the rate of myocardial infarction was higher among patients with (13.5%, n = 5) than without ISA (1.9%, n = 3) (HR = 7.53, 95% CI: 1.79-31.6, P = 0.001). Very late ST was more common among patients with than without ISA [Academic Research Consortium-definite ST:13.5% (n = 5) vs. 0.6% (n = 1) HR = 23.2, 95% CI: 2.65-203, P < 0.001]. In the present study, the presence of ISA as assessed by IVUS 8 months after DES implantation was associated with a higher rate of myocardial infarction and very late stent thrombosis during long-term follow-up. The prognostic impact of ISA on long-term clinical outcomes requires further investigation.
    European Heart Journal 01/2012; 33(11):1334-43. DOI:10.1093/eurheartj/ehr484 · 14.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the impact of arterial injury on neointimal hyperplasia following implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES). A total of 196 patients with 223 segments (sirolimus-eluting stents [SES]: 104, paclitaxel-eluting stents [PES]: 119) underwent intravascular ultrasound eight months after DES implantation. Arterial injury was defined as the balloon-to-artery ratio (BAR). Segments were categorised into two groups: high BAR defined as BAR>1.1 (120 segments), and low BAR defined as BAR < or =1.1 (103 segments). Baseline clinical characteristics were similar for both groups. Although reference vessel diameter was smaller, stent diameter, maximal balloon pressure and balloon diameter were higher in the high BAR compared with the low BAR group. Lumen (7.10±1.91 vs. 6.25±1.69, p=0.001), stent (7.31±1.95 vs. 6.41±1.80, p=0.001), and external elastic membrane (17.1±4.9 vs. 14.8±4.0, p<0.0001) areas (mm2) were higher, but neointimal hyperplasia (0.21±0.36 vs. 0.16±0.48, p=0.42) area (mm2) was similar in the high BAR compared with the low BAR group. Arterial injury as assessed by BAR was not associated with the amount of neointimal hyperplasia (R2=0.003, p=0.40). Arterial injury does not correlate with the amount of neointimal hyperplasia following DES implantation. Conventionally aggressive DES implantation techniques do not adversely affect long-term outcome with respect to restenosis.
    EuroIntervention: journal of EuroPCR in collaboration with the Working Group on Interventional Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology 09/2010; 6(4):467-74. DOI:10.4244/EIJ30V6I4A79 · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inflammation plays a key role in acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Toll-like receptors (TLR) on leucocytes mediate inflammation and immune responses. We characterized leucocytes and TLR expression within coronary thrombi and compared cytokine levels from the site of coronary occlusion with aortic blood (AB) in ACS patients. In 18 ACS patients, thrombi were collected by aspiration during primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Thrombi and AB from these patients as well as AB from 10 age-matched controls without coronary artery disease were assessed by FACS analysis for cellular distribution and TLR expression. For further discrimination of ACS specificity, seven non-coronary intravascular thrombi and eight thrombi generated in vitro were analysed. In 17 additional patients, cytokine levels were determined in blood samples from the site of coronary occlusion under distal occlusion and compared with AB. In coronary thrombi from ACS, the percentage of monocytes related to the total leucocyte count was greater than in AB (47 vs. 20%, P = 0.0002). In thrombi, TLR-4 and TLR-2 were overexpressed on CD14-labelled monocytes, and TLR-2 was increased on CD66b-labelled granulocytes, in comparison with leucocytes in AB. In contrast, in vitro and non-coronary thrombi exhibited no overexpression of TLR-4. Local blood samples taken under distal occlusion revealed elevated concentrations of chemokines (IL-8, MCP-1, eotaxin, MIP-1alpha, and IP-10) and cytokines (IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12, IL-17, IFN-alpha, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) regulating both innate and adaptive immunity (all P < 0.05). In ACS patients, monocytes accumulate within thrombi and specifically overexpress TLR-4. Together with the local expression patterns of chemokines and cytokines, the increase of TLR-4 reflects a concerted activation of this inflammatory pathway at the site of coronary occlusion in ACS.
    European Heart Journal 06/2010; 31(12):1457-69. DOI:10.1093/eurheartj/ehq084 · 14.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to assess predictors of residual shunts after percutaneous patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure with Amplatzer PFO occluder (AGA Medical Corporation, Golden Valley, MN, USA). All percutaneous PFO closures, using Amplatzer PFO occluder performed at a tertiary center between May 2002 and August 2006, were reviewed. Follow-up, including saline contrast transesophageal echocardiography, was performed in all patients 6 months after the intervention. A total of 135 procedures were performed. Mean age of the patients was 51 years. The indication for PFO closure was an ischemic cerebrovascular event in 92%, paradoxical systemic embolism in 4%, and a diving accident in 4%. Recurrent events prior to PFO closure were noted in 34%. A concomitant atrial septal aneurysm was present in 61%. At 6 months follow-up, a residual shunt was detected in 26 patients (19%). Residual shunts were more common in patients with an atrial septal aneurysm (27 vs. 8%, P= .01) and in patients treated with a 35-mm compared with a 25-mm device (39 vs. 15%, P= .01). A concomitant atrial septal aneurysm remained independently associated with residual shunts when controlled for body mass index, gender, age, atrial dimensions, and presence of a Chiari network (odds ratio 4.1, 95% confidence intervals 1.1-15.0). The presence of atrial septal aneurysms in patients undergoing percutaneous PFO closure with an Amplatzer PFO occluder significantly increases the rate of residual shunts at 6 months follow-up, even if 35-mm devices are used.
    Congenital Heart Disease 08/2009; 4(4):252-7. DOI:10.1111/j.1747-0803.2009.00302.x · 1.20 Impact Factor
  • Marco Roffi, Franz R Eberli
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetic patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) are at a high risk for subsequent cardiovascular events but derive, at the same time, greater benefit from evidence-based therapy than non-diabetic individuals. State-of-the-art anti-thrombotic therapy includes a triple anti-platelet combination - aspirin, clopidogrel and glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitors - and unfractionated heparin or enoxaparin. For low- or medium-risk individuals, a treatment based on aspirin, clopidogrel and bivalirudin is a valuable alternative. Prasugrel, a new and more potent inhibitor of the platelet P2Y(12) receptor, has to be regarded as the most promising anti-thrombotic agent for diabetic patients with ACS. This agent may replace clopidogrel - and possibly GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors - in the future. In addition to aggressive anti-thrombotic therapy, diabetic patients should undergo systematic early invasive angiography if presenting with non-ST-segment elevation ACS, and immediate percutaneous coronary intervention if presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Indeed, the benefit derived from these strategies appears to be more pronounced in the diabetic population than in non-diabetic individuals. Despite the benefit, multiple surveys have demonstrated that, in the setting of ACS, diabetic patients receive evidence-based therapy less frequently than non-diabetic counterparts.
    Best Practice & Research: Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 07/2009; 23(3):305-16. DOI:10.1016/j.beem.2009.01.003 · 4.91 Impact Factor
  • Marco Roffi, Franz R Eberli
    Best Practice & Research: Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 07/2009; 23(3):vii-viii. DOI:10.1016/j.beem.2009.01.001 · 4.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to evaluate the degradation rate and long-term vascular responses to the absorbable metal stent (AMS). The AMS demonstrated feasibility and safety at 4 months in human coronary arteries. The PROGRESS-AMS (Clinical Performance and Angiographic Results of Coronary Stenting) was a prospective, multicenter clinical trial of 63 patients with coronary artery disease who underwent AMS implantation. Angiography and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) were conducted immediately after AMS deployment and at 4 months. Eight patients who did not require repeat revascularization at 4 months underwent late angiographic and IVUS follow-up from 12 to 28 months. The AMS was well-expanded upon deployment without immediate recoil. The major contributors for restenosis as detected by IVUS at 4 months were: decrease of external elastic membrane volume (42%), extra-stent neointima (13%), and intra-stent neointima (45%). From 4 months to late follow-up, paired IVUS analysis demonstrated complete stent degradation with durability of the 4-month IVUS indexes. The neointima was reduced by 3.6 +/- 5.2 mm(3), with an increase in the stent cross sectional area of 0.5 +/- 1.0 mm(2) (p = NS). The median in-stent minimal lumen diameter was increased from 1.87 to 2.17 mm at long-term follow-up. The median angiographic late loss was reduced from 0.62 to 0.40 mm by quantitative coronary angiography from 4 months to late follow-up. Intravascular ultrasound imaging supports the safety profile of AMS with degradation at 4 months and maintains durability of the results without any early or late adverse findings. Slower degradation is warranted to provide sufficient radial force to improve long-term patency rates of the AMS.
    JACC. Cardiovascular Interventions 05/2009; 2(4):312-20. DOI:10.1016/j.jcin.2008.09.015 · 7.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe the case of a 59-year-old man who had aortic regurgitation and a hypoplastic aortic valve and for whom an echocardiography evaluation revealed a vascular tumor in the roof of the left atrium, which was suspected to be a hemangioma. After undergoing preoperative invasive catheter coronary angiography, echocardiography, and multislice computed tomography examinations, the patient underwent an aortic miniroot replacement. Intraoperative findings confirmed the findings of the preoperative evaluations. The tumor, although macroscopically verified as a hemangioma, was not resected because of the tumor's position and size, and the threat of uncontrollable bleeding. After an uneventful postoperative clinical course, a subsequent successful transcatheter coil occlusion of the coronary fistula from the left circumflex coronary artery was performed as an alternative to surgical resection of the tumor. This case emphasizes the future role of a multimodality hybrid approach for diagnosis, planning (different 2- and 3-dimensional imaging modalities), and treatment in the form of combining interventional (transcatheter) and surgical (open heart) techniques, which could optimize different treatment strategies. This approach could be further improved by increasing the installations of hybrid operating rooms.
    Heart Surgery Forum 01/2009; 11(6):E375-7. DOI:10.1532/HSF98.20081061
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    ABSTRACT: To prospectively determine the accuracy of 64-section computed tomographic (CT) angiography for the depiction of coronary artery disease (CAD) that induces perfusion defects at myocardial perfusion imaging with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), by using myocardial perfusion imaging as the reference standard. All patients gave written informed consent after the study details, including radiation exposure, were explained. The study protocol was approved by the local institutional review board. In patients referred for elective conventional coronary angiography, an additional 64-section CT angiography study and a myocardial perfusion imaging study (1-day adenosine stress-rest protocol) with technetium 99m-tetrofosmin SPECT were performed before conventional angiography. Coronary artery diameter narrowing of 50% or greater at CT angiography was defined as stenosis and was compared with the myocardial perfusion imaging findings. Quantitative coronary angiography served as a reference standard for CT angiography. A total of 1093 coronary segments in 310 coronary arteries in 78 patients (mean age, 65 years +/- 9 [standard deviation]; 35 women) were analyzed. CT angiography revealed stenoses in 137 segments (13%) corresponding to 91 arteries (29%) in 46 patients (59%). SPECT revealed 14 reversible, 13 fixed, and six partially reversible defects in 31 patients (40%). Sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values, respectively, of CT angiography in the detection of reversible myocardial perfusion imaging defects were 95%, 53%, 94%, and 58% on a per-patient basis and 95%, 75%, 96%, and 72% on a per-artery basis. Agreement between CT and conventional angiography was very good (96% and kappa = 0.92 for patient-based analysis, 93% and kappa = 0.84 for vessel-based analysis). Sixty-four-section CT angiography can help rule out hemodynamically relevant CAD in patients with intermediate to high pretest likelihood, although an abnormal CT angiography study is a poor predictor of ischemia.
    Radiology 09/2008; 248(2):414-23. DOI:10.1148/radiol.2482071307 · 6.21 Impact Factor

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4k Citations
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Institutions

  • 2008–2015
    • Triemli City Hospital
      Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • 2003–2012
    • University of Zurich
      • Institute of Physiology
      Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • 2009
    • University of Geneva
      • Division of Cardiology
      Genève, GE, Switzerland
  • 1999–2007
    • Inselspital, Universitätsspital Bern
      • • Department of Cardiology
      • • Swiss Cardiovascular Center Bern
      Berna, Bern, Switzerland
  • 1998–2003
    • Boston University
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2001
    • University of Massachusetts Boston
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1996
    • Whitaker Wellness Institute
      Newport Beach, California, United States