G Ueltschi

Universität Bern, Bern, BE, Switzerland

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Publications (18)16.99 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Nuclear bone scintigraphy is commonly used in the diagnosis of sacroiliac disease in horses. The aim of the present retrospective study was to determine if there was an association between radiopharmaceutical uptake pattern and radiographic appearance of the sacroiliac region in horses. Seventy-nine horses undergoing bone scintigraphy with Tc-99 m-HDP and radiography of the pelvis because of lameness or poor performance were studied. Subjective and semiquantitative methods were used to characterize and compare radiopharmaceutical uptake between horses. Ventrodorsal radiographs of the region were obtained and were evaluated. Subjectively, 70 horses (88.6%) had an abnormal uptake pattern. In nine horses, the sacroiliac region was normal (11.4%). There was no association between subjective evaluation of the scintigraphic images and semiquantitative methods. There was a significant association between radiopharmaceutical uptake and conformation (T- or Y-like form) and shape (butterfly-, wing-, leaf-, or horn-like) of the sacrum. The radiopharmaceutical uptake of the tubera sacralia was significantly higher in males (left side P = 0.002, right side P = 0.003). In conclusion, the conformation of the sacrum may play an important role in the scintigraphic appearance and may be the cause of increased radiopharmaceutical uptake.
    Veterinary Radiology &amp Ultrasound 01/2009; 50(2):208-14. · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is an accepted form of treatment for chronic cases of proximal suspensory desmitis (PSD). Subjective evaluation of horses shortly after being treated with ESWT has led clinicians to comment on an immediate reduction in lameness. This study aimed to evaluate the analgesic effect of ESWT on 16 horses with PSD or PSD-like pain in a fore- or hindlimb. To objectively assess lameness, gait analysis was performed on an instrumented treadmill before and 6, 24, 48 and 72h after ESWT of the origin of the suspensory ligament and the results compared to the effects of local anaesthesia. Stride frequency, stance duration, vertical impulse and peak vertical force were determined. Thermographic imaging and evaluation of skin sensitivity of the treated area were carried out before and after ESWT in the same interval as gait analysis. The results showed that there were no significant improvements in the investigated parameters at any time after ESWT; however, in horses with affected forelimbs the contralateral weightbearing asymmetry decreased significantly 72h after ESWT. Neither skin sensitivity nor thermographic imaging revealed changes that could be attributed to ESWT.
    The Veterinary Journal 01/2008; 179(1):50-9. · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Radiography is part of evaluating horses with poor performance and pelvic limb lameness; however, the radiographic appearance of the sacroiliac region is poorly described. The goal of the present study was to describe the use of a simple technique to obtain radiographs of the sacroiliac region in the anesthetized horse and to describe the radiographic appearance of this region. Seventy-nine horses underwent radiography of the pelvis under general anesthesia in dorsal recumbency. During a 5s exposure time the horse was actively ventilated to blur the abdominal viscera, which allowed assessment of individual bone structures in 77 horses. A large variation in the shape of the sacral wings, their articulation with the transverse processes of L6, and the relation of the sacrum to the ilium were observed. Females had significantly narrower width of the sacral wings. Broad sacral wings and bony proliferations at the caudal aspect were commonly observed features and their size was highly correlated with gender. In males, caudal osteophytes were significantly larger than in females. Five horses had transitional or hemitransitional vertebrae. Radiography with the ventilation-induced blurring technique is a simple approach that results in diagnostic quality radiographs and delineation of the highly variable bone structures of the sacroiliac region.
    Veterinary Radiology &amp Ultrasound 10/2007; 48(6):501 - 506. · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of lameness caused by proximal metacarpal and metatarsal pain can be challenging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the possibility for further diagnosis but there have been no studies on the normal MRI appearance of the origin of the suspensory ligament (OSL) in conjunction with ultrasonography and histology. To describe the MRI appearance of the OSL in fore- and hindlimbs of sound horses and compare it to the ultrasonographic and histological appearance. The findings can be used as reference values to recognise pathology in the OSL. The OSL in the fore- and hindlimbs of 6 sound horses was examined by ultrasonography prior to death, and MRI and histology post mortem. Qualitative evaluation and morphometry of the OSL were performed and results of all modalities compared. Muscular tissue, artefacts, variable SL size and shape complicated ultrasonographic interpretation. In MRI and histology the forelimb OSL consisted of 2 portions, the lateral being significantly thicker than medial. The hindlimb SL had a single large area of origin. In fore- and hindlimbs, the amount of muscular tissue was significantly larger laterally than medially. Overall SL measurements using MRI were significantly higher than using histology and ultrasonography and histological higher than ultrasonographic measurements. Morphologically, there was a good correlation between MRI and histology. MRI provides more detailed information than ultrasonography regarding muscle fibre detection and OSL dimension and correlates morphologically well with histology. Therefore, ultrasonographic results should be regarded with caution. MRI may be a diagnostic aid when other modalities fail to identify clearly the cause of proximal metacarpal and metatarsal pain; and may improve selection of adequate therapy and prognosis for injuries in this region.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 12/2006; 38(6):508-16. · 2.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine via histologic examination and scintigraphy the effect of focused extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on normal bone and the bone-ligament interface in horses. 6 horses without lameness. Origins of the suspensory ligament at the metacarpus (35-mm probe depth) and fourth metatarsal bone (5-mm probe depth) were treated twice (days 0 and 16) with 2,000 shocks (energy flux density, 0.15 mJ/mm2). One forelimb and 1 hind limb were randomly treated, and the contralateral limbs served as nontreated controls. Bone scans were performed on days -1 (before ESWT), 3, 16, and 19. Histomorphologic studies of control and treated tissues were performed on day 30. ESWT significantly increased the number of osteoblasts but caused no damage to associated soft tissue structures and did not induce cortical microfractures. A significant correlation between osteoblast numbers and radiopharmaceutical uptake was noticed on lateral views of the hind limb on days 3 and 16 and on caudal views of the forelimb on day 3. Results suggested that ESWT has the potential to increase osteoblast numbers in horses. The correlation between increased osteoblast numbers and radio-pharmaceutical uptake 3 days and 16 days after the first ESWT suggested that stimulation of osteogenesis occurred soon after ESWT. No damage to bone or the bone-ligament interface should occur at the settings used in this study, and ESWT can therefore be administered safely in horses.
    American Journal of Veterinary Research 05/2006; 67(4):577-82. · 1.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lameness in horses due to pain originating from the proximal metacarpal/metatarsal region remains a diagnostic challenge. In cases of obvious lameness the pain can be localised to this region by diagnostic anaesthesia. Because a variety of disorders can cause lameness in this region different imaging modalities including radiography, ultrasonography and scintigraphy should be used to arrive at an accurate diagnosis. Even though a precise anatomic-pathologic diagnosis can still be an enigma, because not only bone and joints, but also soft tissue structures including the proximal suspensory ligament, its origin at the proximal metacarpus/ metatarsus, its fascia, the superficial fascia, as well as the intermetacarpal/metatarsal ligaments, the accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor tendon and both digital flexor tendons may be involved. Magnet resonance tomography (MRT) shows a high diagnostic sensitivity in imaging soft tissue structures and bone. In horses MRT is still at the beginning. The MRT appearance of the proximal metacarpal/metatarsal region has not yet been evaluated in detail and there are only few anatomic studies of the origin of the suspensory ligament in horses. The first experiences showed, that more gross and histologic examinations are necessary to fully interpret MRT-images and to differentiate pathologic alterations from clinically not relevant variations.
    SAT Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde 03/2006; 148(2):86-97. · 0.40 Impact Factor
  • Schweizer Archiv Fur Tierheilkunde - SCHWEIZ ARCH TIERHEILKD. 01/2006; 148(02):0086-0097.
  • Simone K Ringer, Christoph J Lischer, Gottlieb Ueltschi
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    ABSTRACT: To monitor the effect of focused extra-corporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on bone and bone-tendon junction of horses without lameness by use of nuclear scintigraphy and thermography. 6 warmblood horses without lameness. The origin of the suspensory ligament at the metacarpus (OSL-MC) and the fourth metatarsal bone were treated at 2 time points (days 0 and 16) with 2,000 shocks applied by a focused ESWT device at an energy flux density of 0.15 mJ/mm2. One forelimb and 1 hind limb were treated, and the contralateral limbs served as controls. To document the effect of focused ESWT, nuclear scintigraphy was performed on days -1, 3, 16 (before second ESWT), and 19. Thermography was performed on days -1, 0 (1 hour after first ESWT), 1, 3, 8, 16 (twice; before and 1 hour after second ESWT), and 19. On days 3, 16 (first scans), and 19, thermography was performed before scintigraphy. Scintigraphically, significant variations in radiopharmaceutical activity at the OSL-MC were detected in treatment and control limbs. No significant differences, however, in mean temperature or radiopharmaceutical activity could be detected by use of thermography or nuclear scintigraphy, respectively, between the treatment and control limbs at any time point in response to ESWT. After 2 treatments of focused ESWT, no physiologic effect on the studied structures could be demonstrated by use of nuclear scintigraphy or thermography. Results of this study indicate that at currently used ESWT settings, no damage to the bone or bone-tendon junction should occur.
    American Journal of Veterinary Research 11/2005; 66(10):1836-42. · 1.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This report describes the case of a 15-month-old alpaca stallion with an open fracture of metatarsus (MT) III/IV that occurred during transportation. Despite of a guarded prognosis, the animal was operated on request of the owner. The surgical intervention consisted of meticulous lavage and curettage of the wound and affected bone, precise fracture reduction, internal fixation with a 12-hole broad 3.5 mm DCP and implantation of a gentamicin impregnated collagen sponge. Primary wound healing was evident and the implant was removed at 3 months after the initial intervention. At 14 months after surgery, the stallion did not show any signs of lameness and was used for service.
    SAT Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde 09/2003; 145(8):378-85. · 0.40 Impact Factor
  • Schweizer Archiv Fur Tierheilkunde - SCHWEIZ ARCH TIERHEILKD. 01/2003; 145(08):0378-0385.
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    ABSTRACT: The elimination of carbon dioxide from the lung can be used to monitor ventilation and perfusion, and 99mtechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA) clearance is a highly sensitive index of alveolar epithelial integrity, which is a presupposition for effective gas exchange. The aim of this study was to determine whether a correlation exists between indices of lung function derived from the single breath diagram for CO2, and 99mTc-DTPA clearance in horses with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The rate of 99mTc-DTPA elimination was negatively and substantially correlated with the dead space according to Bohr's formula, and the physiological and alveolar dead space. Strong and significant correlations existed between the three dead space indices and the alveolar fraction of CO2, and the ratio A1/A2 as an index of alveolar efficiency. The associations found were dependent on the clinical status of health and the mode of calculation of 99mTc-DTPA alveolar clearance.
    Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series A 12/2001; 48(9):553-61. · 0.93 Impact Factor
  • SAT Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde 06/2000; 142(5):289-91. · 0.40 Impact Factor
  • U Geissbühler, A Busato, G Ueltschi
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    ABSTRACT: Obtaining high-quality radiographs of the proximal aspect of equine limbs is difficult because of the large muscles in these regions. The use of scintigraphy may provide further information. Abnormal bone scan findings of the ischial tuberosity or the third trochanter were found in 29 adult horses with obscure hind limb lameness between 1986 and 1996 at the Large Animal Clinic of the University of Bern. Each had abnormal radiopharmaceutical uptake but not all had radiographic changes. Radiopharmaceutical uptake ratios between the ischial tuberosity and the greater trochanter were calculated. The uptake ratio in a control group of 11 clinically sound horses was lower than in 11 lame horses with subjectively enhanced radiopharmaceutical uptake.
    Veterinary Radiology &amp Ultrasound 01/1998; 39(6):572-7. · 1.41 Impact Factor
  • H Häni, J Lang, G Ueltschi
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    ABSTRACT: During archaeological excavations of the former knackers yard in Emmen (Canton Lucerne) skeletons and individual bones of more than 700 animals were recovered. 110 bone samples had lesions and were examined macroscopically and radiologically, 100 were from horses, 9 from dogs and only one from cattle. According to morphological and etiopathogenetical criteria, lesions are presented in the following groups: tooth irregularities (10), degenerative changes in bones and joints due to overload and aging (80), trauma and infection (10), other lesions (10). Over 80% of pathological bone samples presented degenerative changes: spondylosis and spondylarthrosis, arthropathies (mainly spavin and ringbone in horses) and ossifying periostitis due to mechanical stress (Periostitis of phalanx I and periostitis of the dorsal cortex of the third metacarpal bone).
    SAT Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde 02/1994; 136(1):24-37. · 0.40 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Johann Lang, Gottlieb Ueltschi, Hans Geyer
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    ABSTRACT: The lack of "standard uptake pattern" to refer to when interpreting scintigraphic images poses a problem to anyone working with skeletal scintigraphy. An article written by Koblik et al. stated that in the normal scintigraphic image of older horses, the dorsal cortex of the metacarpus and metatarsus is not identifiable, whereas it can be identified in younger horses. In this retrospective study we evaluated the association between the age of a horse and visibility of the dorsal cortex of the metacarpus and metatarsus. We found that dorsal cortical uptake can be seen in the normal adult horse. The population in the study consisted of 139 horses scanned under general anesthesia in lateral recumbency. Scintigraphic images of 202 limbs were examined visually and by using a profile image tool. In almost all limbs the dorsal cortex was identifiable (82%); only 7% of the dorsal cortices were not identifiable; and 11% of the scintigraphic images were not interpretable.
    Veterinary Radiology &amp Ultrasound 45(4):352-6. · 1.41 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Radiography is part of evaluating horses with poor performance and pelvic limb lameness; however, the radiographic appearance of the sacroiliac region is poorly described. The goal of the present study was to describe the use of a simple technique to obtain radiographs of the sacroiliac region in the anesthetized horse and to describe the radiographic appearance of this region. Seventy-nine horses underwent radiography of the pelvis under general anesthesia in dorsal recumbency. During a 5s exposure time the horse was actively ventilated to blur the abdominal viscera, which allowed assessment of individual bone structures in 77 horses. A large variation in the shape of the sacral wings, their articulation with the transverse processes of L6, and the relation of the sacrum to the ilium were observed. Females had significantly narrower width of the sacral wings. Broad sacral wings and bony proliferations at the caudal aspect were commonly observed features and their size was highly correlated with gender. In males, caudal osteophytes were significantly larger than in females. Five horses had transitional or hemitransitional vertebrae. Radiography with the ventilation-induced blurring technique is a simple approach that results in diagnostic quality radiographs and delineation of the highly variable bone structures of the sacroiliac region.
    Veterinary Radiology &amp Ultrasound 48(6):501-6. · 1.41 Impact Factor