Daniele Botticelli

University of Havana, La Habana, Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba

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Publications (74)236.22 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To compare the sequential healing at implants installed in a healed alveolar bony ridge or immediately after tooth extraction without functional load.Material and methodsIn the mandible of 12 dogs, the mesial roots of the first molars were endodontically treated, the tooth hemisected, and the distal roots extracted. After 3 months, the mesial roots of the fourth premolars were endodontically treated, the tooth hemisected, and the distal roots extracted in one side of the mandible. Implants were placed immediately into extraction sockets (IPIES) of the fourth premolar and in the healed sites in the molar regions. Healing abutments were placed, and the flaps were sutured to allow a non-submerged healing. The time of surgery and of sacrifices were planned in such a way to obtain biopsies representing the healing after 1 and 2 weeks and 1 and 3 months, respectively. Ground sections were prepared for histological evaluation of tissues components on the implant surface and the coronal termination level of osseointegration (M-B).ResultsNew bone apposition on the implant surface was slightly higher at the healed compared to the IPIES sites, being 7.4% and 4.1% after 1 week, and 67.3% and 65.3% after 3 months, respectively. Old bone was progressively resorbed, from 27.0% and 21.9% after 1 week, to 2.5% and 2.0% after 3 months, at healed and IPIES sites, respectively. M-B was 1.4 mm and 2.6 mm after 1 week, 1.2 mm and 1.2 mm after 3 months, at healed and IPIES sites, respectively.Conclusions Similar patterns of sequential osseointegration were found at implants installed in healed alveolar bone or in alveolar sockets immediately after tooth extraction. The coronal termination level of osseointegration, that was different after 1 week, was found similar at the 3-month observation.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 12/2014; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: AimTo evaluate the influence of yellow bone marrow on osseointegration of titanium oral implants using a long bone model.Material and methodsThe two tibiae of eight sheep were used as experimental sites. Two osteotomies for implant installation were prepared in each tibia. At the control sites, no further treatments were performed while, at the test sites, bone marrow was removed from the osteotomy site with a curette to an extent that exceeded the implant dimensions. As a result, the apical portion of the implants at the control sites was in contact with bone marrow while, at the test sites, it was in contact with the blood clot. After 2 months, the same procedures were performed in the contralateral side. After another month, the animal was sacrificed. Ground sections were obtained for histological analysis.ResultsAfter 1 month of healing, no differences between test and control sites were found in the apical extension of osseointegration and the percentage of new bone-to-implant contact. However, after 3 months of healing, a higher percentage of new bone-to-implant contact was found at the test compared to the control sites in the marrow compartment. The apical extension of osseointegration, however, was similar to that found at the 1-month healing period both for test and control sites.Conclusions Osseointegration appeared to be favored by the presence of a blood clot when compared to the presence of yellow fatty bone marrow. Moreover, the contact with cortical bone appeared to be a prerequisite for the osseointegration process in the long bone model.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 09/2014; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To study the sequential healing at bicortically installed implants with surface modifications by the use of fluoroboric acid and/or H2O2.Material and methodsTwenty-eight albino New Zealand rabbits were used. Two recipient sites were prepared in the tibiae bilaterally, one in the metaphysis and the second in the diaphysis regions. Four implants with different surface characteristics were randomly installed with bicortical stabilization: (i) sandblasted and acid-etched; (ii) same surface as i, but with a substitution of the hydrofluoric acid with fluoroboric acid; (iii) same surface as i, additionally treated with H2O2; and (iv) same surface modified as ii, additionally treated with H2O2. The animals were killed after 5, 8, 15, and 30 days. Ground sections were prepared for histological analyses.ResultsNo statistically significant differences in osseointegration were found among various surfaces at any of the healing periods. A higher degree of osseointegration was observed at the implants placed in the metaphysis compared to those placed in the diaphysis, especially during early healing. A higher degree of osseointegration was found at sites with proximity to compact (cortical) bone when compared to the middle portion of the implants, especially in the diaphysis region.Conclusions Surfaces modified with different acids or H2O2 resulted in similar osseointegration compared to a standard sandblasted and acid-etched surface. The portion of the bicortically installed implants in close contact with the cortical compartment presented a higher percentage of osseointegration compared with the region in contact with the bone marrow compartment.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 09/2014; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To evaluate in vitro the quality of dental implant biopsies collected using trephines or a sonic instrument.Method Sixty implants, 4 mm long and 2.4 mm in diameter, were installed in twelve fresh bovine ribs. Biopsies were collected after using three different methods for retrieval, 20 biopsies representing each group: (A) A trephine used concentrically; (B) a trephine used eccentrically; and (C) a sonic device (Sonosurgery®). The time used for biopsy collection was recorded, and an evaluation of the quality of the biopsies obtained was performed. The specimens were subsequently prepared for ground sections, and tissue-to-implant contact percentages (TIC%) were evaluated in a stereomicroscope.ResultsTime needed for biopsy collection in Groups A and B was between 2 and 3 min, while in C, it amounted to 10–11 min. The differences between Group C and the other two groups were statistically significant (P < 0.00006). Group C showed significantly greater volumes of tissue around the apex of the implants compared with the other two groups (P < 0.027). Groups A and C showed biopsies with higher quality compared with Group B (P < 0.05). Group C presented a higher TIC% compared with the other two groups (P < 0.008).Conclusion Compared with the use of trephines, the use of a sonic device for harvesting biopsies resulted in higher-quality biopsies and generated smaller residual defects. However, the harvesting was more time-consuming and was limited to one aspect of the implants.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 08/2014; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To compare peri-implant soft- and hard-tissue integration at implants installed juxta- or sub-crestally. Furthermore, differences in the hard and soft peri-implant tissue dimensions at sites prepared with drills or sonic instruments were to be evaluated.Material and methodsThree months after tooth extraction in six dogs, recipient sites were prepared in both sides of the mandible using conventional drills or a sonic device (Sonosurgery®). Two implants with a 1.7-mm high-polished neck were installed, one with the rough/smooth surface interface placed at the level of the buccal bony crest (control) and the second placed 1.3 mm deeper (test). After 8 weeks of non-submerged healing, biopsies were harvested and ground sections prepared for histological evaluation.ResultsThe buccal distances between the abutment/fixture junction (AF) and the most coronal level of osseointegration (B) were 1.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.4 mm; between AF and the top of the bony crest (C), they were 1.4 ± 0.4 and 2.2 ± 0.2 mm at the test and control sites, respectively. The top of the peri-implant mucosa (PM) was located more coronally at the test (1.2 ± 0.6 mm) compared to the control sites (0.6 ± 0.5 mm). However, when the original position of the bony crest was taken into account, a higher bone loss and a more apical position of the peri-implant mucosa resulted at the test sites.Conclusions The placement of implants into a sub-crestal location resulted in a higher vertical buccal bone resorption and a more apical position of the peri-implant mucosa in relation to the level of the bony crest at implant installation. Moreover, peri-implant hard-tissue dimensions were similar at sites prepared with either drills or Sonosurgery®.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 08/2014; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing of autologous bone block grafts or deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) block grafts applied concomitantly with collagen membranes for horizontal alveolar ridge augmentation.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 06/2014; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study reports on the histologic characteristics of the early phases of implant osseointegration, focusing on osteopontin concentrations in the coronal area of implants placed with marginal defects and in control sites without defect preparation. In the mandibular right area of 12 dogs, two recipient sites were prepared and the margins were widened to obtain a gap of 0.5 mm at one site (small defect) and 1.25 mm at another site (large defect). Implants were placed and allowed a fully submerged healing. The procedure was subsequently performed in the left side in such a way as to obtain healing times of 5, 10, 20, and 30 days. Paraffin sections were stained with osteopontin antibodies and analyzed. At control implants, scarcely organized collagen fibers were observed in the space between the pristine bone and implant and were quickly replaced by mineralized tissue. In the small and large defects, the collagen fibers were organized in a layer that ran parallel to the implant at day 10 and became denser and thicker with time. Osteopontin was evenly distributed in the peri-implant tissue at control implants, while it was mainly located in the collagen bundle section around the implants placed in the defects.
    The International journal of periodontics & restorative dentistry. 05/2014; 34(3):e50-7.
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the sequential healing after elevation of the maxillary sinus mucosa applying the lateral access technique with the use of autogenous bone grafting without membrane to occlude the osteotomy access. Immediately after the elevation of the maxillary sinus Schneiderian membrane, applying the lateral access technique in 10 minipigs, autologous bone was harvested from the lateral aspect of the mandibular molar region and ground into particles with a bone mill. The space under the Schneiderian membrane was filled with this graft. No membranes were placed onto the access osteotomy. The healing was evaluated after 15, 30, 90 and 180 days. Paraffin sections were prepared and analyzed histologically. After 15 days of healing, the elevated area was mainly filled with provisional matrix, newly formed bone and some remnants of bone chips, and appeared reduced in volume compared with that at the time of surgery. After 30 days of healing, further shrinkage of the height of the elevated space was found, with similar percentages of the different tissue components. After 90 and 180 days, the area underneath the Schneiderian membrane appeared reduced in volume and condensed toward the base of the sinus. The bone tissues appeared to be more mature, both for the mineralized and the non-mineralized portions, while connective tissue occupied 20% of the space, most likely related to the lack of the use of a membrane occluding the access at the time of surgery. Suboptimal healing outcomes with respect to augmentation of the space under the sinus floor membrane were documented when autologous bone chips were used as a filler and no membrane was applied to cover the access.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 04/2014; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: AimTo evaluate prospectively the clinical and radiographic outcomes after 5 years of early loading of 6-mm implants with a moderately rough (SLActive®) surface supporting single crowns in the posterior regions.Material and methodsThirty-five consecutive patients received 40 SLActive® (Straumann) 6-mm implants with a diameter of 4.1 mm (n = 19) or 4.8 mm (n = 21). Insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis (RFA) were measured at implant installation. RFA was also measured at abutment connection. SynOcta abutments were tightened with 35 Ncm after 6 weeks of healing, and single porcelain fuse to metal crowns was cemented within 1 week. Implant survival rate and marginal bone loss were evaluated at various time intervals until 5 years after loading. The clinical crown/implant ratio was calculated as well.ResultsTwo of 40 implants were lost before loading (incorporation rate 95%), and no further implant loss or technical complications were encountered during the 5-year follow-up period. A mean marginal bone loss of 0.7 ± 0.6 mm was found after 5 years of function. The clinical crown/implant ratio increased with time from 1.6 at the delivery of the prosthesis to 2 after 5 years of loading.Conclusion Six millimeter implants with a SLActive® moderately rough surface supporting single crowns in the posterior region and loaded after 6–7 weeks maintained full function for at least 5 year with low marginal bone resorption.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 04/2014; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To study bone healing at implants installed with different insertion torques.Material and methodsIn six Labrador dogs, all mandibular premolars and first molars were extracted. After 4 months of healing, flaps were elevated, and two implant sites were prepared at each side of the mandible. In the right side of the mandible, the distal sites were prepared conventionally, while the mesial sites were over-prepared by 0.2 mm. As a consequence, a final insertion torque of ~30 Ncm at the distal and a minimal insertion torque close to 0 Ncm at the mesial sites were obtained. In the left sides of the mandible, however, the recipient sites were underprepared by 0.3 mm resulting in an insertion torque of ≥70 Ncm at both implants. Cover screws were applied, and flaps sutured to fully submerge the experimental sites. After 4 months, the animals were sacrificed and ground sections obtained for histological evaluation.ResultsThe mineralized bone-to-implant contact was in the range of 55.2–62.1%, displaying the highest value at implants with ~30 Ncm insertion torque and the lowest value at the implant sites with close to 0 Ncm insertion torque. No statistically significant differences were revealed. Bone density was in the range of 43.4–54.9%, yielding the highest value at implants with ≥70 Ncm insertion torque and the lowest at the implant sites with close to 0 Ncm insertion torque. The difference between the sites of ~30 Ncm and the corresponding ≥70 Ncm insertion torque reached statistical significance.Conclusions Similar amounts of osseointegration were obtained irrespective of the insertion torque applied. Moreover, implants installed in sites with close to 0 Ncm insertion torque may properly osseointegrate as well.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 03/2014; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To compare the sequential healing at immediately loaded implants installed in a healed alveolar bony ridge or immediately after tooth extraction.Material and methodsIn the mandible of 12 dogs, the second premolars were extracted. After 3 months, the mesial roots of the third premolars were endodontically treated and the distal roots extracted. Implants were placed immediately into the extraction sockets (test) and in the second premolar region (control). Crowns were applied at the second and third maxillary premolars, and healing abutments of appropriate length were applied at both implants placed in the mandible and adapted to allow occlusal contacts with the crowns in the maxilla. The time of surgery and time of sacrifices were planned in such a way to obtain biopsies representing the healing after 1 and 2 weeks and 1 and 3 months. Ground sections were prepared for histological analyses.ResultsAt the control sites, a resorption of the buccal bone of 1 mm was found after 1 week and remained stable thereafter. At the test sites, the resorption was 0.4 mm at 1-week period and further loss was observed after 1 month. The height of the peri-implant soft tissue was 3.8 mm both at test and control sites. Higher values of mineralized bone-to-implant contact and bone density were seen at the controls compared with the test sites. The differences, however, were not statistically significant.Conclusions Different patterns of sequential early healing were found at implants installed in healed alveolar bone or in alveolar sockets immediately after tooth extractions. However, three months after implant installation, no statistically significant differences were found for the hard- and soft-tissue dimensions.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 03/2014; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare peri-implant tissue healing at implants installed in sites prepared with conventional drills or a sonic device. In six Beagle dogs, the mandibular premolars and first molars were extracted bilaterally. After 3 months, full-thickness muco-periosteal flaps were elevated and recipient sites were prepared in both sides of the mandible. In the right side (control), the osteotomies were prepared using conventional drills, while, at the left side (test), a sonic device (Sonosurgery(®) ) was used. Two implants were installed in each side of the mandible. After 8 weeks of non-submerged healing, biopsies were harvested and ground sections prepared for histological evaluation. The time consumed for the osteotomies at the test was more than double compared to the conventional control sites. No statistically significant differences were found for any of the histological variables evaluated for hard and soft tissue dimensions. Although not statistically significant, slightly higher mineralized bone-to-implant contact was found at the test (65.4%) compared to the control (58.1) sites. Similar healing characteristics in osseointegration and marginal hard tissue remodeling resulted at implants installed into osteotomies prepared with conventional drills or with the sonic instrument (Sonosurgery(®) ).
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 02/2014; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare with pristine sites bone resorption and soft tissue adaptation at implants placed immediately into extraction sockets (IPIES) in conjunction with deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) particles and a collagen membrane. The mesial root of the third premolar in the left side of the mandible was endodontically treated (Test). Flaps were elevated, the tooth hemi-sectioned, and the distal root removed to allow the immediate installation of an implant into the extraction socket in a lingual position. DBBM particles were placed into the defect and on the outer contour of the buccal bony ridge, concomitantly with the placement of a collagen membrane. A non-submerged healing was allowed. The premolar on the right side of the mandible was left in situ (control). Ground sections from the center of the implant as well as from the center of the distal root of the third premolar of the opposite side of the mandible were obtained. The histological image from the implant site was superimposed to that of the contralateral pristine distal alveolus, and dimensional variation evaluated for the hard tissue and the alveolar ridge. After 3 months of healing, both histological and photographic evaluation revealed a reduction of hard and soft tissue dimensions. The contour augmentation performed with DBBM particles and a collagen membrane at the buccal aspects of implants placed IPIES was not able to maintain the tissue volume.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 12/2013; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the influence of different insertion torques on healing of implants loaded immediately or left unloaded. In six Labrador dogs, all mandibular premolars and molars were extracted. After 4 months of healing, flaps were elevated, and two implant sites were prepared at each side of the mandible. The distal sites were prepared conventionally while the mesial sites were underprepared by 0.3 mm. As a consequence, different final insertion torques of about 30 Ncm at the distal and >70 Ncm at the mesial sites were recorded. Healing abutments were applied to the left and transmucosal abutments to the right side. Flaps were sutured, crown preparation of the upper right second and third premolars was performed, and impressions were taken. Within 24 h, crowns were cemented both to implants and teeth in the right side of the mouth. After 4 months, the animals were sacrificed and ground sections obtained for histological evaluation. A higher buccal bony crestal resorption and a more apical position of the coronal level of osseointegration were found at the loaded compared with the unloaded sites. MBIC% and percentages of peri-implant mineralized tissue (MB%) were higher at the loaded compared with the unloaded sites. Moreover, a higher MBIC% was found at the lower compared with the higher final insertion torque. Immediate loading does not seem to have a negative effect on osseointegration. High torque values for the immediate loading procedures were not necessary. Probably, low torque values, were sufficient to obtain primary stability and hence may provide better osseointegration than high torque value.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 12/2013; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the hard tissue changes at implants installed applying edentulous ridge expansion (E.R.E.) at sites with a buccal bony wall thickness of 1 or 2 mm. In six Labrador dogs, the first and second maxillary incisors were extracted, and the buccal alveolar bony plates and septa were removed. After 3 months of healing, partial-thickness flaps were dissected, and the E.R.E. was applied bilaterally. Hence, an expansion of the buccal bony crest was obtained in both sides of the maxilla with a displacement of either a 1- or a 2-mm-wide buccal bony plate at the test and control sites, respectively. After 3 months of healing, biopsies were obtained for histological analyses. A buccal vertical resorption of the alveolar crest of 2.3 ± 0.8 and 2.1 ± 1.1 mm, and a coronal level of osseointegration at the buccal aspect of 2.7 ± 0.5 and 2.9 ± 0.9 mm were found at the test (1 mm) and control (2 mm) sites, respectively. The differences did not reach statistical significance. The mean values of the mineralized bone-to-implant contact (MBIC%) ranged from 62% to 73% at the buccal and lingual sites. No statistically significant differences were found. Horizontal volume gains of 1.8 and 1.1 mm were observed at the test and control sites, respectively, and the difference being statistically significant. Implants installed using the E.R.E. technique yielded a high degree of osseointegration. It is suggested that the displacement of buccal bony plates of 1 mm thickness is preferable compared with that of wider dimensions.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 12/2013; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To study bony and soft tissue changes at implants installed in alveolar bony ridges of different widths. In 6 Labrador dogs, the mandibular premolars and first molars were extracted, and a buccal defect was created in the left side at the third and fourth premolars by removing the buccal bone and the inter-radicular and interdental septa. Three months after tooth extraction, full-thickness mucoperiosteal flaps were elevated, and implants were installed, two at the reduced (test) and two at the regular-sized ridges (control). Narrow or wide abutments were affixed to the implants. After 3 months, biopsies were harvested, and ground sections prepared for histological evaluation. A higher vertical buccal bony crest resorption was found at the test (1.5 ± 0.7 mm and 1.0 ± 0.7 mm) compared to the control implants (1.0 ± 0.5 mm and 0.7 ± 0.4 mm), for both wide and narrow abutment sites. A higher horizontal alveolar resorption was identified at the control compared to the test implants. The difference was significant for narrow abutment sites. The peri-implant mucosa was more coronally positioned at the narrow abutment, in the test sites, while for the control sites, the mucosal adaptation was more coronal at the wide abutment sites. These differences, however, did not reach statistical significance. Implants installed in regular-sized alveolar ridges had a higher horizontal, but a lower vertical buccal bony crest resorption compared to implants installed in reduced alveolar ridges. Narrow abutments in reduced ridges as well as wide abutments in regular-sized ridges yielded less soft tissue recession compared to their counterparts.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 12/2013; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the hard tissue alterations of the alveolar bone crest following tooth extraction and immediate implant placement using cone beam computed tomography. Twelve consecutive patients in need of an immediate dental implant were included in the study. An implant of proper length was placed in the extraction socket with the coronal margin of the rough surface generally flush with or deeper than the buccal alveolar bone crest. All patients underwent a radiologic examination both immediately after implant placement (T1) and at the time of reentry 4 months after surgery (T2). The survival rate of 12 immediate implants at 4 months was 100%. Only 9 of 12 patients completed the study. The comparison between tomographies performed at T1 and T2 showed substantial variations in alveolar bone, mainly at the buccal aspect, registering a vertical gain of about 3.2 mm. The horizontal resorption of the alveolar bone crest appeared to be more marked at the buccal than at the lingual aspects. At the buccal aspect, the resorption was 1.9 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.6 mm at the measurements performed at 1, 3, and 5 mm apical to the crest, respectively. At the lingual aspect, the corresponding values were 0.6 mm, 0.7 mm, and 0.5 mm, respectively. The bone crest area was more or less the same at T1 and T2, while the total area decreased after 4 months of healing but was not statistically significant. The results should be viewed with caution because of the small number of cases examined. The results confirm the success of immediate implant placement.
    The International journal of periodontics & restorative dentistry. 11/2013; 33(6):815-823.
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    ABSTRACT: To study the buccal dimensional tissue changes at oral implants following free gingival grafting, with or without including the keratin layer, performed at the time of implant installation into alveolar mucosa. The mandibular premolars and first molars were extracted bilaterally in six Beagle dogs. In the right side of the mandible (Test), flaps were first elevated, and the buccal as well as part of the lingual masticatory mucosa was removed. An incision of the periosteum at the buccal aspect was performed to allow the flap to be coronally repositioned. Primary wound closure was obtained. In the left side, the masticatory (keratinized) mucosa was left in situ, and no sutures were applied (Control). After 3 months of healing, absence of keratinized mucosa was confirmed at the test sites. Two recipient sites were prepared at each side of the mandible in the region of the third and fourth premolars. All implants were installed with the shoulder placed flush with the buccal alveolar bony crest, and abutments were connected to allow a non-submerged healing. Two free gingival mucosal grafts were harvested from the buccal region of the maxillary canines. One graft was left intact (gingival mucosal graft), while for the second, the epithelial layer was removed (gingival connective tissue graft). Subsequently, the grafts were fixed around the test implants in position of the third and fourth premolars, respectively. After 3 months, the animals were euthanized and ground sections obtained. Similar bony crest resorption and coronal extension of osseointegration were found at test and control sites. Moreover, similar dimensions of the peri-implant soft tissues were obtained at test and control sites. The increase in the alveolar mucosal thickness by means of a gingival graft affected the peri-implant marginal bone resorption and soft tissue recession around implants. This resulted in outcomes that were similar to those at implants surrounded by masticatory mucosa, indicating that gingival grafting in the absence of keratinized mucosa around implants may reduce the resorption of the marginal crest and soft tissue recession.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 10/2013; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the healing and bony crest resorption at implants installed conventionally or applying an edentulous ridge expansion (ERE) technique in the maxilla. In six Labrador dogs, the first and second maxillary incisors were extracted bilaterally. In the left side of the maxilla (Test), the flaps were elevated and the buccal plate of the alveoli and septa was removed. After 3 months of healing, partial-thickness (split) flaps were dissected and the residual alveolar bone was exposed. In the right side of the maxilla, an implant was installed conventionally (Type IV; Control) while, in the left side, the ERE technique was adopted. Hence, an expansion of the buccal bony crest was obtained, and the implant was subsequently installed (Test). After 3 months of healing, biopsies were obtained and ground sections were prepared for histological analyses. A buccal vertical resorption of the bony crest of 2.2 ± 1.2 mm and 1.6 ± 0.7 mm was found at the test and control sites, respectively. The difference, however, did not reach statistical significance. The coronal level of osseointegration at the buccal aspect was located at 3.1 ± 1.0 mm and 2.2 ± 0.7 mm from the implant shoulder at the test and control sites, respectively, the difference being statistically significant. The mean values of the mineralized bone-to-implant contact (MBIC%) ranged from 43% to 48% at the buccal and lingual sites. No differences reached statistical significance. Implants installed by applying an ERE technique may osseointegrate similarly to conventional implant installation. However, vertical and horizontal resorption of the displaced buccal bony wall occurred as well.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 09/2013; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the influence of the configuration of the marginal aspect of implants placed immediately into extraction sockets on peri-implant hard tissue adaptation. In 6 Labrador dogs, endodontic treatments of the mesial roots of 1 M1 were performed and the distal roots were removed. 2 P2 was extracted as well. Implants were immediately placed in the center of the distal alveoli. Cylindrical straight implants were installed in the right side of the mandible (Control), while, in the left side, implants with a reduced diameter in the coronal portion, yielding an indentation in the surface continuity (Test), were installed. Cover screws were affixed, and the flaps were sutured to allow non-submerged healing. After 4 months of healing, histological slides were obtained for assessments. A buccal resorption of 1.58 ± 1.28 and 1.90 ± 1.93 mm at the control and of 0.26 ± 0.90 and 0.14 ± 0.66 mm at the test sites was observed at the premolar and molar regions, respectively. The buccal coronal level of osseointegration was located apically to the margin of the smooth/rough surface border by 2.40 ± 0.90 and 3.70 ± 0.87 mm at the control sites and 1.19 ± 0.45 and 2.16 ± 0.96 mm at the test sites at the premolar and molar sites, respectively. All differences yielded statistical significance. The use of implants with a reduced diameter in their coronal aspect may contribute to preservation of the buccal bony crest in a more coronal level compared with conventional implants. Thus, the study confirmed the efficacy of the "platform switching" concept.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 09/2013; · 3.43 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
236.22 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2013
    • University of Havana
      La Habana, Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba
    • University of Padova
      Padua, Veneto, Italy
    • The University of Hong Kong
      Hong Kong, Hong Kong
  • 2010–2013
    • University of Bologna
      Bolonia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
  • 2010–2012
    • São Paulo State University
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2011
    • University of Western Australia
      • Centre for Rural and Remote Oral Health
      Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    • University of Milan
      Milano, Lombardy, Italy
  • 2007
    • KU Leuven
      • Department of Oral Health Sciences
      Leuven, VLG, Belgium
  • 2003–2006
    • University of Gothenburg
      • Department of Periodontology
      Goeteborg, Västra Götaland, Sweden