Alexa Beiser

McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Are you Alexa Beiser?

Claim your profile

Publications (174)1732.14 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Boston criteria are the basis for a noninvasive diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in the setting of lobar intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We assessed the accuracy of these criteria in individuals with lobar microbleeds (MBs) without ICH. We identified individuals aged >55 years having brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic assessment of CAA in a single academic hospital and a community-based population (Framingham Heart Study [FHS]). We determined the positive predictive value (PPV) of the Boston criteria for CAA in both cohorts, using lobar MBs as the only hemorrhagic lesion to fulfill the criteria. We included 102 individuals: 55 from the hospital-based cohort and 47 from FHS (mean age at MRI 74.7 ± 8.5 and 83.4 ± 10.9 years; CAA prevalence 60% and 46.8%; cases with any lobar MB 49% and 21.3%; and cases with ≥2 strictly lobar MBs 29.1% and 8.5%, respectively). PPV of "probable CAA" (≥2 strictly lobar MBs) was 87.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 60.4-97.8) and 25 (95% CI, 13.2-78) in hospital and general populations, respectively. Strictly lobar MBs strongly predict CAA in non-ICH individuals when found in a hospital context. However, their diagnostic accuracy in the general population appears limited. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association 06/2015; 128. DOI:10.1016/j.jalz.2015.04.009 · 17.47 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Comprehensive long-term data on atrial fibrillation trends in men and women are scant. We aimed to provide such data through analysis of the Framingham cohort over 50 years. We investigated trends in incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for atrial fibrillation and its association with stroke and mortality after onset in 9511 participants enrolled in the Framingham Heart Study between 1958 and 2007. We analysed trends within 10 year groups (1958-67, 1968-77, 1978-87, 1988-97, and 1998-2007), stratified by sex. During 50 years of observation (202 417 person-years), 1544 cases of new-onset atrial fibrillation occurred (of whom 723 [47%] were women). Between 1958-67 and 1998-2007, age-adjusted prevalence of atrial fibrillation quadrupled from 20·4 to 96·2 cases per 1000 person-years in men and from 13·7 to 49·4 cases per 1000 person-years in women; age-adjusted incidence increased from 3·7 to 13·4 new cases per 1000 person-years in men and from 2·5 to 8·6 new cases per 1000 person-years in women (ptrend<0·0001 for all comparisons). For atrial fibrillation diagnosed by electrocardiograph (ECG) during routine Framingham examinations, age-adjusted prevalence per 1000 person-years increased (12·6 in 1958-67 to 25·7 in 1998-2007 in men, ptrend=0·0007; 8·1 to 11·8 in women, ptrend=0·009). However, age-adjusted incidence of atrial fibrillation by Framingham Heart Study ECGs did not change significantly with time. Although the prevalence of most risk factors changed over time, their associated hazards for atrial fibrillation changed little. Multivariable-adjusted proportional hazards models revealed a 74% (95% CI 50-86%) decrease in stroke (hazards ratio [HR] 3·77, 95% CI 1·98-7·20 in 1958-1967 compared with 1998-2007; ptrend=0·0001) and a 25% (95% CI -3-46%) decrease in mortality (HR 1·34, 95% CI 0·97-1·86 in 1958-1967 compared with 1998-2007; ptrend=0·003) in 20 years following atrial fibrillation onset. Trends of increased incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation in the community were probably partly due to enhanced surveillance. Measures are needed to enhance early detection of atrial fibrillation, through increased awareness coupled with targeted screening programmes and risk factor-specific prevention. NIH, NHLBI, NINDS, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    The Lancet 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61774-8 · 45.22 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the possible early consequences of impaired glucose metabolism on the brain by assessing the relationship of diabetes, fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels, and insulin resistance with cognitive performance and brain integrity in healthy young and middle-aged adults. The sample included dementia-free participants (mean age 40 ± 9 years; 53% women) of the Framingham Heart Study third-generation cohort with cognitive testing of memory, abstract reasoning, visual perception, attention, and executive function (n = 2,126). In addition, brain MRI examination (n = 1,597) was used to determine white matter, gray matter, and white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volumes and fractional anisotropy measures. We used linear regression models to assess relationships between diabetes, FBG, and insulin resistance with cognition, lobar gray matter, and WMH volumes as well as voxel-based microstructural white matter integrity and gray matter density, adjusting for potential confounders. Mediating effect of brain lesions on the association of diabetes with cognitive performance was also tested. Diabetes was associated with worse memory, visual perception, and attention performance; increased WMH; and decreased total cerebral brain and occipital lobar gray matter volumes. The link of diabetes with attention and memory was mediated through occipital and frontal atrophy, and the latter also through hippocampal atrophy. Both diabetes and increased FBG were associated with large areas of reductions in gray matter density and fractional anisotropy on voxel-based analyses. We found that hyperglycemia is associated with subtle brain injury and impaired attention and memory even in young adults, indicating that brain injury is an early manifestation of impaired glucose metabolism. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.
    Neurology 05/2015; 84(23). DOI:10.1212/WNL.0000000000001655 · 8.30 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution is associated with cerebrovascular disease and cognitive impairment, but whether it is related to structural changes in the brain is not clear. We examined the associations between residential long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and markers of brain aging using magnetic resonance imaging. Framingham Offspring Study participants who attended the seventh examination were at least 60 years old and free of dementia and stroke were included. We evaluated associations between exposures (fine particulate matter [PM2.5] and residential proximity to major roadways) and measures of total cerebral brain volume, hippocampal volume, white matter hyperintensity volume (log-transformed and extensive white matter hyperintensity volume for age), and covert brain infarcts. Models were adjusted for age, clinical covariates, indicators of socioeconomic position, and temporal trends. A 2-μg/m(3) increase in PM2.5 was associated with -0.32% (95% confidence interval, -0.59 to -0.05) smaller total cerebral brain volume and 1.46 (95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 1.94) higher odds of covert brain infarcts. Living further away from a major roadway was associated with 0.10 (95% confidence interval, 0.01 to 0.19) greater log-transformed white matter hyperintensity volume for an interquartile range difference in distance, but no clear pattern of association was observed for extensive white matter. Exposure to elevated levels of PM2.5 was associated with smaller total cerebral brain volume, a marker of age-associated brain atrophy, and with higher odds of covert brain infarcts. These findings suggest that air pollution is associated with insidious effects on structural brain aging even in dementia- and stroke-free persons. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
    Stroke 04/2015; 46(5). DOI:10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.008348 · 6.02 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Molecular Psychiatry 04/2015; · 15.15 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To identify common variants contributing to normal variation in two specific domains of cognitive functioning, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of executive functioning and information processing speed in non-demented older adults from the CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology) consortium. Neuropsychological testing was available for 5429-32 070 subjects of European ancestry aged 45 years or older, free of dementia and clinical stroke at the time of cognitive testing from 20 cohorts in the discovery phase. We analyzed performance on the Trail Making Test parts A and B, the Letter Digit Substitution Test (LDST), the Digit Symbol Substitution Task (DSST), semantic and phonemic fluency tests, and the Stroop Color and Word Test. Replication was sought in 1311-21860 subjects from 20 independent cohorts. A significant association was observed in the discovery cohorts for the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs17518584 (discovery P-value=3.12 × 10(-8)) and in the joint discovery and replication meta-analysis (P-value=3.28 × 10(-9) after adjustment for age, gender and education) in an intron of the gene cell adhesion molecule 2 (CADM2) for performance on the LDST/DSST. Rs17518584 is located about 170 kb upstream of the transcription start site of the major transcript for the CADM2 gene, but is within an intron of a variant transcript that includes an alternative first exon. The variant is associated with expression of CADM2 in the cingulate cortex (P-value=4 × 10(-4)). The protein encoded by CADM2 is involved in glutamate signaling (P-value=7.22 × 10(-15)), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport (P-value=1.36 × 10(-11)) and neuron cell-cell adhesion (P-value=1.48 × 10(-13)). Our findings suggest that genetic variation in the CADM2 gene is associated with individual differences in information processing speed.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 14 April 2015; doi:10.1038/mp.2015.37.
    Molecular Psychiatry 04/2015; DOI:10.1038/mp.2015.37 · 15.15 Impact Factor
  • Nature 04/2015; 520(7545):E2-E3. DOI:10.1038/nature14038 · 42.35 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Workplace stress is known to be related with many behavioral and disease outcomes. However, little is known about its prospective relationship with measures of cognitive decline. To investigate the association of job strain, psychological demands and job control on cognitive decline. Participants from Framingham Offspring cohort (n=1429), were assessed on job strain, and received neuropsychological assessment approximately 15 years and 21 years afterwards. High job strain and low control were associated with decline in verbal learning and memory. Job strain was associated with decline in word recognition skills. Active job and passive job predicted decline in verbal learning and memory relative to low strain jobs in the younger subgroup. Active job and demands were positively associated with abstract reasoning skills. Job strain and job control may influence decline in cognitive performance.
    04/2015; 6(2):79-94.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Analysis sought to determine whether Wechsler Memory Scale-Logical Memory (LM)-correct responses and errors were related to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain volume measurements. The LM immediate (LM-I) and LM delay (LM-D) free recall correct responses and related and unrelated errors were scored. Principal components analysis yielded a 3-factor solution: LM-I and LM-D correct responses, LM-I and LM-D-unrelated errors, and LM-I/-D-related errors. The MRI total cerebral brain volume, frontal brain volume, temporal horn volume (THV), and white matter hyperintensities volume (WMHIV) were obtained. Increasing THV (suggesting greater regional atrophy) was associated with lower scores on the LM-correct responses factor. Extensive WMHIV was associated with higher scores on the LM-related errors factor. These results suggest that LM-correct responses could relate to emerging brain alterations. Longitudinal research might enhance the sensitivity of this test to identify preclinical impairment and persons at risk of mild cognitive impairment and dementia. © The Author(s) 2015.
    American Journal of Alzheimer s Disease and Other Dementias 03/2015; DOI:10.1177/1533317515577184 · 1.43 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a pleiotropic peptide involved in maintaining endothelial integrity. It is unknown if circulating BDNF levels are associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We prospectively investigated the association of circulating BDNF levels with cardiovascular events and mortality in 3687 participants (mean age 65 years, 2068 women) from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS). Using a common nonsynonomous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the BDNF gene (rs6265), we then performed a Mendelian randomization experiment in the CARDIoGRAM (Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-Wide Replication And Meta-Analysis) consortium (>22 000 coronary artery disease [CAD] cases, >60 000 controls) to investigate whether SNP rs6265 was associated with CAD in CARDIoGRAM and, if so, whether the effect estimate differed from that predicted based on FHS data. On follow-up (median 8.9 years), 467 individuals (261 women) in FHS experienced a CVD event, and 835 (430 women) died. In multivariable-adjusted Cox regression, serum BDNF was associated inversely with CVD risk (hazard ratio [HR] per 1-SD increase 0.88, 95% CI 0.80 to 0.97, P=0.01) and with mortality (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.80 to 0.93, P=0.0002). SNP rs6265 was associated with BDNF concentrations (0.772 ng/mL increase per minor allele copy) in FHS. In CARDIoGRAM, SNP rs6265 was associated with CAD (odds ratio 0.957, 95% CI 0.923 to 0.992), a magnitude consistent with the predicted effect (HR per minor allele copy 0.99, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.0; P=0.06 for difference between predicted and observed effect). Higher serum BDNF is associated with a decreased risk of CVD and mortality. Mendelian randomization suggests a causal protective role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of CVD. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.
    Journal of the American Heart Association 02/2015; 4(3). DOI:10.1161/JAHA.114.001544 · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: -Cross-sectional epidemiological and clinical research suggest lower cardiac index is associated with abnormal brain aging, including smaller brain volumes, increased white matter hyperintensities, and worse cognitive performances. Lower systemic blood flow may have implications for dementia among older adults. -1039 Framingham Offspring Cohort participants free from clinical stroke, transient ischemic attack, or dementia formed our sample (69±6 years; 53% women). Multivariable-adjusted proportional hazard models adjusting for Framingham Stroke Risk Profile score (age, sex, systolic blood pressure, anti-hypertensive medication, diabetes, cigarette smoking, cardiovascular disease [CVD] history, atrial fibrillation), education, and apolipoprotein E4 status related cardiac MRI-assessed cardiac index (cardiac output/body surface area) to incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Over the median 7.7 year follow-up period, 32 participants developed dementia, including 26 cases of AD. Each one standard deviation unit decrease in cardiac index increased the relative risk of both dementia (HR=1.66; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.11-2.47; p=0.013) and AD (HR=1.65; 95% CI, 1.07-2.54; p=0.022). Compared to normal cardiac index, individuals with clinically low cardiac index had a higher relative risk of dementia (HR=2.07; 95% CI, 1.02-4.19; p=0.044). If participants with clinically prevalent CVD and atrial fibrillation were excluded (n=184), individuals with clinically low cardiac index had a higher relative risk of both dementia (HR=2.92; 95% CI, 1.34-6.36; p=0.007) and AD (HR=2.87; 95% CI, 1.21-6.80; p=0.016) compared to individuals with normal cardiac index. -Lower cardiac index is associated with an increased risk for the development of dementia and AD.
    Circulation 02/2015; 10(4). DOI:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.012438 · 14.95 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: -The burden of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMH) is associated with an increased risk of stroke, dementia, and death. WMH are highly heritable, but their genetic underpinnings are incompletely characterized. To identify novel genetic variants influencing WMH burden, we conducted a meta-analysis of multi-ethnic genome-wide association studies. -We included 21,079 middle-aged to elderly individuals from 29 population-based cohorts, who were free of dementia and stroke and were of European (N=17,936), African (N=1,943), Hispanic (N=795), and Asian (N=405) descent. WMH burden was quantified on MRI either by a validated automated segmentation method or a validated visual grading scale. Genotype data in each study were imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference. Within each ethnic group, we investigated the relationship between each SNP and WMH burden using a linear regression model adjusted for age, sex, intracranial volume, and principal components of ancestry. A meta-analysis was conducted for each ethnicity separately and for the combined sample. In the European descent samples, we confirmed a previously known locus on chr17q25 (p=2.7×10(-19)) and identified novel loci on chr10q24 (p=1.6×10(-9)) and chr2p21 (p=4.4×10(-8)). In the multi-ethnic meta-analysis, we identified two additional loci, on chr1q22 (p=2.0×10(-8)) and chr2p16 (p=1.5×10(-8)). The novel loci contained genes that have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (chr2p21, chr10q24), intracerebral hemorrhage (chr1q22), neuro-inflammatory diseases (chr2p21), and glioma (chr10q24, chr2p16). -We identified four novel genetic loci that implicate inflammatory and glial proliferative pathways in the development of white matter hyperintensities in addition to previously-proposed ischemic mechanisms.
    Circulation Cardiovascular Genetics 02/2015; DOI:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.114.000858 · 5.34 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: General cognitive function is substantially heritable across the human life course from adolescence to old age. We investigated the genetic contribution to variation in this important, health- and well-being-related trait in middle-aged and older adults. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of 31 cohorts (N=53 949) in which the participants had undertaken multiple, diverse cognitive tests. A general cognitive function phenotype was tested for, and created in each cohort by principal component analysis. We report 13 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations in three genomic regions, 6q16.1, 14q12 and 19q13.32 (best SNP and closest gene, respectively: rs10457441, P=3.93 × 10−9, MIR2113; rs17522122, P=2.55 × 10−8, AKAP6; rs10119, P=5.67 × 10−9, APOE/TOMM40). We report one gene-based significant association with the HMGN1 gene located on chromosome 21 (P=1 × 10−6). These genes have previously been associated with neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Meta-analysis results are consistent with a polygenic model of inheritance. To estimate SNP-based heritability, the genome-wide complex trait analysis procedure was applied to two large cohorts, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (N=6617) and the Health and Retirement Study (N=5976). The proportion of phenotypic variation accounted for by all genotyped common SNPs was 29% (s.e.=5%) and 28% (s.e.=7%), respectively. Using polygenic prediction analysis, ~1.2% of the variance in general cognitive function was predicted in the Generation Scotland cohort (N=5487; P=1.5 × 10−17). In hypothesis-driven tests, there was significant association between general cognitive function and four genes previously associated with Alzheimer’s disease: TOMM40, APOE, ABCG1 and MEF2C.
    Molecular Psychiatry 02/2015; 20(2). DOI:10.1038/mp.2014.188 · 15.15 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigated the association between circulating biomarkers of inflammation and MRI markers of small vessel disease. We performed a cross-sectional study relating a panel of 15 biomarkers, representing systemic inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, tumor necrosis factor α, tumor necrosis factor receptor 2, osteoprotegerin, and fibrinogen), vascular inflammation (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, CD40 ligand, P-selectin, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 mass and activity, total homocysteine, and vascular endothelial growth factor), and oxidative stress (myeloperoxidase) to ischemic (white matter hyperintensities/silent cerebral infarcts) and hemorrhagic (cerebral microbleeds) markers of cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) on MRI in 1,763 stroke-free Framingham offspring (mean age 60.2 ± 9.1 years, 53.7% women). We observed higher levels of circulating tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 and myeloperoxidase in the presence of cerebral microbleed (odds ratio [OR] 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-4.1 and OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.0, respectively), higher levels of osteoprotegerin (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.2), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.5), and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 mass (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1), and lower myeloperoxidase (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.7-1.0) in participants with greater white matter hyperintensity volumes and silent cerebral infarcts. Our study supports a possible role for inflammation in the pathogenesis of CSVD, but suggests that differing inflammatory pathways may underlie ischemic and hemorrhagic subtypes. If validated in other samples, these biomarkers may improve stroke risk prognostication and point to novel therapeutic targets to combat CSVD. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.
    Neurology 01/2015; 84(8). DOI:10.1212/WNL.0000000000001279 · 8.30 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To examine the relationship between plasma lipid measurements and incident ischemic vascular events (ischemic stroke [IS], and as a positive control, myocardial infarction [MI]) in a community cohort. In 6,276 stroke-free Framingham participants (aged 64 ± 10 years, 56% female), we related plasma lipid levels (total cholesterol [TC], high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], and TC/HDL-C ratio) measured at the original cohort 15th (1977-1979) and 20th examination cycles (1986-1990) and (TC, HDL-C, TC/HDL-C ratio, triglycerides [TG], and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]) measured at the offspring fourth examination (1995-1998), to 10-year risk of incident IS and MI. Utilizing genome-wide genotyping in the same subjects, we used mendelian randomization methods to assess whether observed associations were incidental or causal. During a mean follow-up of 9 years, 301 participants experienced incident IS. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, HDL-C ≤40 mg/dL and TC/HDL ratio ≥5 were associated with increased risk of IS (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.59 [1.23-2.05], p < 0.001 and 1.47 [1.15-1.87], p < 0.001), but not TC or LDL-C. In adjusted analysis, a strong association between TG and IS was diminished. In the MI-free sample (n = 5,875, aged 64 ± 10 years, 58% female; 403 MI events), all lipid markers were associated with MI risk. A genetic risk score comprising 47 known determinants of circulating HDL-C was not associated with IS. In a middle-aged to elderly community sample, we observed that low HDL-C and high TC/HDL-C ratio, but not LDL-C or TG were associated with risk of incident IS. We observed the usual associations between lipids and risk of MI. Our findings suggest an important, but less likely causal, role of HDL-C over other lipid biomarkers for optimal stroke risk stratification. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.
    Neurology 01/2015; 84(5). DOI:10.1212/WNL.0000000000001202 · 8.30 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Its diagnosis relies solely on a clinical examination and is not straightforward because no diagnostic test exists. Large, population-based, prospective cohort studies designed to examine other outcomes that are more common than PD might provide cost-efficient alternatives for studying the disease. However, most cohort studies have not implemented rigorous systematic screening for PD. A majority of epidemiologic studies that utilize population-based prospective designs rely on secondary data sources to identify PD cases. Direct validation of these secondary sources against clinical diagnostic criteria is lacking. The Framingham Heart Study has prospectively screened and evaluated participants for PD based on clinical diagnostic criteria. We assessed the predictive value of secondary sources for PD identification relative to clinical diagnostic criteria in the Framingham Heart Study (2001-2012). We found positive predictive values of 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.868, 1.0), 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.839, 1.0), and 0.50 (95% confidence interval: 0.307, 0.694) for PD identified from self-report, use of antiparkinsonian medications, and Medicare claims, respectively. The negative predictive values were all higher than 0.99. Our results highlight the limitations of using only Medicare claims data and suggest that population-based cohorts may be utilized for the study of PD determined via self-report or medication inventories while preserving a high degree of confidence in the validity of PD case identification. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    American Journal of Epidemiology 12/2014; 181(3). DOI:10.1093/aje/kwu326 · 4.98 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: the risk apolipoprotein E-4 (APOE4) poses for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may vary based on the neuropsychological definition of MCI. a community-based cohort study. using two psychometric neuropsychological impairment definitions, we examined APOE4 and prevalent MCI among older adults or pre-MCI among middle-aged adults. Neuropsychological, clinical and genetic data were collected on 2,239 Framingham Offspring Cohort participants free from clinical stroke or dementia (62 ± 9 years; 54% women). Prevalent amnestic MCI was defined from neuropsychological performances ≥1.5 SD below the mean based on (i) age and education or (ii) age and Wide Range Achievement Test-3 Reading (WRAT-3 Reading) performance adjustment. in the entire sample, multivariable-adjusted logistic regressions found that APOE4 was associated with amnestic MCI when using the age and WRAT Reading definition (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, P = 0.002) but not the age and education definition (OR = 1.0, P = 0.90). Results were modified by age, such that APOE4 was associated with amnestic MCI in participants ≥65 years using both the age and WRAT Reading definition (OR = 2.4, P < 0.001) and the age and education definition (OR = 1.7, P = 0.04). APOE4 risk for prevalent amnestic MCI varies depending on the definition of objective neuropsychological impairment for MCI. Our findings support existing literature emphasising the need to refine MCI neuropsychological profiling methods. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Age and Ageing 12/2014; 44(2). DOI:10.1093/ageing/afu183 · 3.11 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Memory performance in older persons can reflect genetic influences on cognitive function and dementing processes. We aimed to identify genetic contributions to verbal declarative memory in a community setting. We conducted genome-wide association studies for paragraph or word list delayed recall in 19 cohorts from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium, comprising 29,076 dementia- and stroke-free individuals of European descent, aged ≥45 years. Replication of suggestive associations (p < 5 × 10(-6)) was sought in 10,617 participants of European descent, 3811 African-Americans, and 1561 young adults. rs4420638, near APOE, was associated with poorer delayed recall performance in discovery (p = 5.57 × 10(-10)) and replication cohorts (p = 5.65 × 10(-8)). This association was stronger for paragraph than word list delayed recall and in the oldest persons. Two associations with specific tests, in subsets of the total sample, reached genome-wide significance in combined analyses of discovery and replication (rs11074779 [HS3ST4], p = 3.11 × 10(-8), and rs6813517 [SPOCK3], p = 2.58 × 10(-8)) near genes involved in immune response. A genetic score combining 58 independent suggestive memory risk variants was associated with increasing Alzheimer disease pathology in 725 autopsy samples. Association of memory risk loci with gene expression in 138 human hippocampus samples showed cis-associations with WDR48 and CLDN5, both related to ubiquitin metabolism. This largest study to date exploring the genetics of memory function in ~40,000 older individuals revealed genome-wide associations and suggested an involvement of immune and ubiquitin pathways. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Detection of “any cognitive impairment” is mandated as part of the Medicare annual wellness visit, but screening all patients may result in excessive false positives. Methods We developed and validated a brief Dementia Screening Indicator using data from four large, ongoing cohort studies (the Cardiovascular Health Study [CHS]; the Framingham Heart Study [FHS]; the Health and Retirement Study [HRS]; the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging [SALSA]) to help clinicians identify a subgroup of high-risk patients to target for cognitive screening. Results The final Dementia Screening Indicator included age (1 point/year; ages, 65–79 years), less than 12 years of education (9 points), stroke (6 points), diabetes mellitus (3 points), body mass index less than 18.5 kg/m2 (8 points), requiring assistance with money or medications (10 points), and depressive symptoms (6 points). Accuracy was good across the cohorts (Harrell's C statistic: CHS, 0.68; FHS, 0.77; HRS, 0.76; SALSA, 0.78). Conclusions The Dementia Screening Indicator is a simple tool that may be useful in primary care settings to identify high-risk patients to target for cognitive screening.
    Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association 11/2014; 10(6). DOI:10.1016/j.jalz.2013.11.006 · 17.47 Impact Factor
  • 43rd Annual Meeting of the Child-Neurology-Society; 10/2014

Publication Stats

13k Citations
1,732.14 Total Impact Points

Top Journals

Institutions

  • 2015
    • McMaster University
      Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  • 2012–2015
    • University of California, Davis
      • Department of Neurology
      Davis, California, United States
    • Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam
      • Department of Epidemiology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Medicine
      Seattle, WA, United States
  • 2011–2015
    • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
      • Division of Cardiovascular Sciences (DCVS)
      베서스다, Maryland, United States
    • Harvard University
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1998–2015
    • Boston University
      • • Department of Neurology
      • • Department of Biostatistics
      • • Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Nutrition
      • • Section of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology
      • • Department of Mathematics and Statistics
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
      Buffalo, New York, United States
  • 2014
    • Beverly Hospital, Boston MA
      Beverly, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2002–2013
    • University of Massachusetts Boston
      • Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • National Institutes of Health
      Maryland, United States
  • 2009
    • Erasmus MC
      • Department of Epidemiology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2004
    • Northwestern University
      • Feinberg School of Medicine
      Evanston, Illinois, United States
    • University of Alberta
      • Department of Medicine
      Edmonton, Alberta, Canada