Mohini Mistry

University College London, Londinium, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (8)60.15 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST) has been proposed to restrict expression of repressor element 1 (RE1) bearing genes to differentiated neurons by silencing their expression in non-neural tissue. Here, we have examined the interaction of REST with the M(4) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor gene. We show that REST binds to the RE1 of the M(4) gene in those cell lines and brain regions where the M(4) gene is expressed but not in those where the M(4) is not expressed. Furthermore, in cells that express M(4), the presence of REST represses but is insufficient to silence transcription of M(4). In non-neural cells REST is absent from the RE1 of the silent M(4) gene and perturbation of REST function fails to induce M(4) expression. We propose that REST acts to regulate expression levels of some RE1-bearing genes in neural cells, thereby playing an important role in defining neuronal activity.
    Journal of Molecular Biology 01/2004; 334(5):863-74. · 3.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuronal hyperexcitability is a feature of epilepsy and both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. M currents [IK(M)] play a key role in regulating neuronal excitability, and mutations in neuronal KCNQ2/3 subunits, the molecular correlates of IK(M), have previously been linked to benign familial neonatal epilepsy. Here, we demonstrate that KCNQ/M channels are also present in nociceptive sensory systems. IK(M) was identified, on the basis of biophysical and pharmacological properties, in cultured neurons isolated from dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) from 17-d-old rats. Currents were inhibited by the M-channel blockers linopirdine (IC50, 2.1 microm) and XE991 (IC50, 0.26 microm) and enhanced by retigabine (10 microm). The expression of neuronal KCNQ subunits in DRG neurons was confirmed using reverse transcription-PCR and single-cell PCR analysis and by immunofluorescence. Retigabine, applied to the dorsal spinal cord, inhibited C and Adelta fiber-mediated responses of dorsal horn neurons evoked by natural or electrical afferent stimulation and the progressive "windup" discharge with repetitive stimulation in normal rats and in rats subjected to spinal nerve ligation. Retigabine also inhibited responses to intrapaw application of carrageenan in a rat model of chronic pain; this was reversed by XE991. It is suggested that IK(M) plays a key role in controlling the excitability of nociceptors and may represent a novel analgesic target.
    Journal of Neuroscience 09/2003; 23(18):7227-36. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Voltage-gated Na(+) currents play critical roles in shaping electrogenesis in neurons. Here, we have identified a TTX-resistant Na(+) current (TTX-R I(Na)) in duodenum myenteric neurons of guinea pig and rat and have sought evidence regarding the molecular identity of the channel producing this current from the expression of Na(+) channel alpha subunits and the biophysical and pharmacological properties of TTX-R I(Na). Whole-cell patch-clamp recording from in situ neurons revealed the presence of a voltage-gated Na(+) current that was highly resistant to TTX (IC(50), approximately 200 microm) and selectively distributed in myenteric sensory neurons but not in interneurons and motor neurons. TTX-R I(Na) activated slowly in response to depolarization and exhibited a threshold for activation at -50 mV. V(1/2) values of activation and steady-state inactivation were -32 and -31 mV in the absence of fluoride, respectively, which, as predicted from the window current, generated persistent currents. TTX-R I(Na) also had prominent ultraslow inactivation, which turns off 50% of the conductance at rest (-60 mV). Substituting CsF for CsCl in the intracellular solution shifted the voltage-dependent parameters of TTX-R I(Na) leftward by approximately 20 mV. Under these conditions, TTX-R I(Na) had voltage-dependent properties similar to those reported previously for NaN/Na(V)1.9 in dorsal root ganglion neurons. Consistent with this, reverse transcription-PCR, single-cell profiling, and immunostaining experiments indicated that Na(V)1.9 transcripts and subunits, but not Na(V)1.8, were expressed in the enteric nervous system and restricted to myenteric sensory neurons. TTX-R I(Na) may play an important role in regulating subthreshold electrogenesis and boosting synaptic stimuli, thereby conferring distinct integrative properties to myenteric sensory neurons.
    Journal of Neuroscience 05/2003; 23(7):2715-25. · 6.91 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 01/2003; 124(4). · 12.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: M-type K(+) currents (I(K(M))) play a key role in regulating neuronal excitability. In sympathetic neurons, M-channels are thought to be composed of a heteromeric assembly of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 K(+) channel subunits. Here, we have tried to identify the KCNQ subunits that are involved in the generation of I(K(M)) in hippocampal pyramidal neurons cultured from 5- to 7-day-old rats. RT-PCR of either CA1 or CA3 regions revealed the presence of KCNQ2, KCNQ3, KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 subunits. Single-cell PCR of dissociated hippocampal pyramidal neurons gave detectable signals for only KCNQ2, KCNQ3 and KCNQ5; where tested, most also expressed mRNA for the vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT1. Staining for KCNQ2 and KCNQ5 protein showed punctate fluorescence on both the somata and dendrites of hippocampal neurons. Staining for KCNQ3 was diffusely distributed whereas KCNQ4 was undetectable. In perforated patch recordings, linopirdine, a specific M-channel blocker, fully inhibited I(K(M)) with an IC(50) of 3.6 +/- 1.5 microM. In 70 % of these cells, TEA fully suppressed I(K(M)) with an IC(50) of 0.7 +/- 0.1 mM. In the remaining cells, TEA maximally reduced I(K(M)) by only 59.7 +/- 5.2 % with an IC(50) of 1.4 +/- 0.3 mM; residual I(K(M)) was abolished by linopirdine. Our data suggest that KCNQ2, KCNQ3 and KCNQ5 subunits contribute to I(K(M)) in these neurons and that the variations in TEA sensitivity may reflect differential expression of KCNQ2, KCNQ3 and KCNQ5 subunits.
    The Journal of Physiology 11/2002; 544(Pt 1):29-37. · 4.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: M(1) muscarinic (M(1)AChRs) and B(2) bradykinin (B(2)Rs) receptors are two PLCbeta-coupled receptors that mobilize Ca(2+) in nonexcitable cells. In many neurons, however, B(2)Rs but not M(1)AChRs mobilize intracellular Ca(2+). We have studied the membrane organization and dynamics underlying this coupling specificity by using Trp channels as biosensors for real-time detection of PLCbeta products. We found that, in sympathetic neurons, although both receptors rapidly produced DAG and InsP(3) as messengers, only InsP(3) formed by B(2)Rs has the ability to activate IP(3)Rs. This exclusive coupling results from spatially restricted complexes linking B(2)Rs to IP(3)Rs, a missing partnership for M(1)AChRs. These complexes allow fast and localized rises of InsP(3), necessary to activate the low-affinity neuronal IP(3)R. Thus, these signaling microdomains are of critical importance for the induction of selective responses, discriminating proinflammatory information associated with B(2)Rs from cholinergic neurotransmission.
    Neuron 05/2002; 34(2):209-20. · 15.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: M-currents are K+ currents generated by members of the KCNQ family of K+ channels (Wang et al., 1998). However, in some cells, M-like currents may be contaminated by members of other K+ channel gene families, such as the erg family (Meves et al., 1999; Selyanko et al., 1999). In the present experiments, we have used the acute expression of pore-defective mutants of KCNQ3 (DN-KCNQ3) and Merg1a (DN-Merg1a) as dominant negatives to separate the contributions of these two families to M-like currents in NG108-15 neuroblastoma hybrid cells and rat sympathetic neurons. Two kinetically and pharmacologically separable components of M-like current could be recorded from NG108-15 cells that were individually suppressed by DN-Merg1a and DN-KCNQ3, respectively. In contrast, only DN-KCNQ3, and not DN-Merg1a, reduced currents recorded from sympathetic neurons. Pharmacological tests suggested that the residual current in DN-KCNQ3-treated sympathetic neurons was carried by residual KCNQ channels. Ineffectiveness of DN-Merg1a in sympathetic neurons was not caused by lack of expression, as judged by confocal microscopy of Flag-tagged DN-Merg1a. These results accord with previous inferences regarding the roles of erg and KCNQ channels in generating M-like currents. This experimental approach should therefore be useful in delineating the contributions of members of these two gene families to K+ currents in other cells.
    Journal of Neuroscience 04/2002; 22(5):RC212. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The specific cellular response to muscarinic receptor activation is dependent upon appropriate expression of each of the five muscarinic receptor genes by individual cells. Here we summarise recent work describing some of the genomic regulatory elements and transcriptional mechanisms that control expression of the M1 and M4 genes.
    Life Sciences 02/1999; 64(6-7):495-9. · 2.56 Impact Factor