Carolina Galiana

University CEU Cardenal Herrera, Valenza, Valencia, Spain

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Publications (7)11.97 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: IntroductionHepatitis E virus (HEV) is the main causative agent of enterically transmitted non-A non-B hepatitis with a self-limiting clinical presentation in humans. The increasing number of non-immigrant cases of hepatitis E and the high prevalence detected in pigs suggested that this species is a reservoir. Several studies have been published describing differences in the prevalence of anti-HEV antibodies between people exposed and not exposed to pigs, but the risk factors for the acquisition of the virus have not been well studied. The aim of this work was to study the prevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV), IgG and IgM antibodies anti-HEV and the risk factors for the acquisition of this virus in a populations exposed and unexposed to pigs.
    Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica 01/2010; 28(9):602-607. · 1.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work was to study the prevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) and the risk factors for the acquisition of the virus in a population in contact with swine and unexposed to swine. A total of 198 individuals, 97 unexposed (49%) and 101 exposed (51%) to swine, were tested for the presence of HEV infection. The prevalence of anti-HEV IgG in the exposed group was 18.8% versus 4.1% in the unexposed to swine group. People exposed to swine were observed to be 5.4 times (P 0.03) at risk of having anti-HEV IgG. Ten (52.6%) of the IgG-positive individuals showed two concomitant risk factors: untreated water consumption and exposure to swine. These data support that HEV infection should be treated as a vocational illness in swine workers. Therefore, systematic application of hygiene measures in this collective is highly recommended to avoid the exposition to this virus.
    The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene 06/2009; · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work was to study the prevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) and the risk factors for the acquisition of the virus in a population in contact with swine and unexposed to swine. A total of 198 individuals, 97 unexposed (49%) and 101 exposed (51%) to swine, were tested for the presence of HEV infection. The prevalence of anti-HEV IgG in the exposed group was 18.8% versus 4.1% in the unexposed to swine group. People exposed to swine were observed to be 5.4 times (P = 0.03) at risk of having anti-HEV IgG. Ten (52.6%) of the IgG-positive individuals showed two concomitant risk factors: untreated water consumption and exposure to swine. These data support that HEV infection should be treated as a vocational illness in swine workers. Therefore, systematic application of hygiene measures in this collective is highly recommended to avoid the exposition to this virus.
    The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene 07/2008; 78(6):1012-5. · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the first hepatitis E infection case detected in a slaughterhouse worker. The identified strain belonged to genotype 3, subtype 3f. Partial sequence analysis of the strain isolated from his serum showed a percentage of nucleotide homology ranging from 83.4% up to 97.3% compared with European human and swine strains, respectively. These findings point strongly to hepatitis E virus as a vocationally acquired illness by means of the manipulation of infected organs from pigs.
    The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene 12/2007; 77(5):893-6. · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study describes the distribution of Hepatitis E virus (HEV) in a naturally infected swine population and the genetic relatedness of HEV strains on swine farms in Spain. Of fecal and serum samples collected from 131 pigs and manure-ditch samples collected from 17 farms, HEV was detected in 16%, 14%, and 59%, respectively, for an overall prevalence rate of 23%. The maximum prevalence rates for feces and serum were in pigs 5 to 12 wk old. A high prevalence of the virus in feces (18%) was observed in sows. Gene sequencing was performed on 6 strains from feces, serum, and manure ditch: the nucleotide identities varied from 81.5% to 99% when compared with those of other strains of genotype 3 isolated from swine. This is the first study in Europe to show the variation in virus distribution by age in feces and serum in a naturally infected swine population.
    Canadian journal of veterinary research = Revue canadienne de recherche vétérinaire 08/2007; 71(3):236-40. · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The reduction in salivary flow in patients subjected to head and neck irradiation induces changes in the oral microflora and increases the risk of oral mucosal infections. The frequent presence of fungi, particularly Candida, in the oral environment of these patients complicates identification of the most important cariogenic bacteria with the commercial CRT Bacteria (Ivoclar Vivadent) culture media. Such identification is important for the application of chemical measures to control cariogenic bacteria in these patients, since it has been shown that simple fluoride application is unable to control caries in this population. The aim of this study was to obtain a simple medium that inhibits Candida spp. growth and allows the specific growth of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp. Thus, reliable counts of cariogenic species can be achieved. Stimulated saliva samples from 30 head- and neck-radiotherapy patients were seeded in commercial CRT Bacteria culture medium and in two different media designed by our group: mitis salivarius bacitracin agar (MSBA), containing 5% potassium tellurite and fluconazole 64 microg/ml (MSBTPF) for the isolation of Streptococcus; and Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) agar, containing bacitracin 0.2 U/ml and fluconazole 32 microg/ml (MRSBF) for the isolation of Lactobacillus spp. Candida growth was inhibited 100% in the media developed in this study. In all the samples seeded, growing of colonies in MRSBF was identified as Lactobacillus, while in CRT Bacteria for Lactobacillus spp. this species was only isolated in 48.1% of the samples. S. mutans was identified in 71.4% of the colonies that grown in MSBTPF medium, while in CRT Bacteria for S. mutans, this species was only identified in 35% of the colonies obtained. The culture medium developed in the present study was able to inhibit the 100% of Candida spp. growth. These new media permit reliable counts of cariogenic bacteria in irradiated patients.
    Oral health & preventive dentistry 02/2007; 5(4):285-9. · 0.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine at which production stages hepatitis E virus (HEV) is shed by the highest number of pigs and to estimate the relative risk associated with each stage. For this purpose, 146 fecal samples of pigs from 21 farms were studied. In addition, 1 sample from the manure ditch and another sample of drinking water, collected directly from the trough located in the pen, were taken from 16 farms. HEV RNA was detected in fecal samples from 34 pigs (23.29%). The production stages in which most pigs excreted HEV were weaners (41.7%) and pigs in the first month of feeding (60%). The results of the statistical analysis showed that the principal significant risk stage in HEV shedding was the first month of feeding (odds ratio [OR] 19.5, 95% CI 3.59-106.07, P = 0.001) followed by the weaners stage (OR 9.3, 95% CI .78-48.42, P = 0.008). In 8 out of 16 farms tested (50%) HEV RNA was detected in raw manure and in the water trough of only 1. Detection of HEV in manure ditches raises the concern of how to deal with manure of swine origin, because it is used as soil fertilizer.
    Journal of veterinary diagnostic investigation: official publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc 10/2006; 18(5):462-5. · 1.18 Impact Factor