Susana Barrena

Universidad de Salamanca, Helmantica, Castille and León, Spain

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Publications (19)99.58 Total impact

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    Leukemia: official journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K 03/2014; 28(8). DOI:10.1038/leu.2014.103 · 9.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: For decades now, it is well established that chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematopoietic stem cell (HPC) disorder. However, it remains to be determined whether BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangement occurs in a HPC or at an earlier stem cell and whether the degree of involvement of hematopoiesis by the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene relates to the response to therapy. Here, we have investigated by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) the distribution of BCR-ABL1 fusion gene in FACS-sorted bone marrow (BM) populations of mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) and other hematopoietic cell populations from 18 newly diagnosed CML patients. Overall, our results showed systematic involvement at relatively high percentages of BM maturing neutrophils (97% ± 15%), basophils (95% ± 12%), eosinophils (90% ± 8%), CD34+ precursors cells (90% ± 7%), monocytes (84% ± 30%), nucleated red blood cells (87% ± 24%), and mast cells (77% ± 33%). By contrast, MPC (30% ± 34%), B-cells (15% ± 27%), T-lymphocytes (50% ± 26%), and NK-cells (35% ± 34%) were involved at lower percentages. In 8/18 CML patients, ≥2 tumor BCR-ABL1+ subclones were detected by iFISH. Of note, all tumor cell subclones were systematically detected in CD34+ cells, whereas MPC were only involved by the ancestral tumor cell subclone. In summary, here we confirm the presence at diagnosis of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene in MPC, CD34+ precursors, and other different BM hematopoietic myeloid cell lineages from CML patients, including also in a significant fraction of cases, a smaller percentage of T, B, and NK lymphocytes. Interestingly, involvement of MPC was restricted to the ancestral BCR-ABL1+ subclone. Am. J. Hematol. 89:288–294, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    American Journal of Hematology 03/2014; 89(3). DOI:10.1002/ajh.23626 · 3.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To establish the utility of flow cytometry (FCM) for screening and diagnosis of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) from lymphoid tissue samples obtained by fine-needle aspiration (FNA). We compared prospectively FCM versus cytology/histology analysis of FNA samples for the diagnostic screening and further World Health Organization (WHO) subclassification of B-NHL. FCM and cytology showed a high degree of agreement (93%); however, diagnosis of reactive processes (RP), B-NHL and T-NHL by FCM showed higher sensitivity than cytology (92-100% versus 64-94%, respectively), without false positive NHL cases. The antibody combination used did not allow a positive diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma as distinct from a RP. A high concordance rate was found between FCM and histopathology (74%) in subtyping B-NHL. In this regard, mantle-cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma showed the highest degree of agreement (100% concordant rates). In turn, FCM showed higher sensitivity/specificity in classifying follicular lymphoma (FL) and large B cell lymphomas, while the opposite occurred for marginal-zone and lymphoplasmacytic lymphomas. FCM enhances the diagnostic ability of FNA cytology, playing a crucial role in a rapid and accurate differential diagnosis between RP, B-NHL and T-NHL. In addition, immunophenotyping of FNA samples contributes to a more precise subclassification of B-NHL when combined with histopathology and genetic/molecular data.
    Histopathology 03/2011; 58(6):906-18. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2559.2011.03804.x · 3.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Immunophenotypic characterization of B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (B-CLPD) is becoming increasingly complex due to usage of progressively larger panels of reagents and a high number of World Health Organization (WHO) entities. Typically, data analysis is performed separately for each stained aliquot of a sample; subsequently, an expert interprets the overall immunophenotypic profile (IP) of neoplastic B-cells and assigns it to specific diagnostic categories. We constructed a principal component analysis (PCA)-based tool to guide immunophenotypic classification of B-CLPD. Three reference groups of immunophenotypic data files—B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemias (B-CLL; n=10), mantle cell (MCL; n=10) and follicular lymphomas (FL; n=10)—were built. Subsequently, each of the 175 cases studied was evaluated and assigned to either one of the three reference groups or to none of them (other B-CLPD). Most cases (89%) were correctly assigned to their corresponding WHO diagnostic group with overall positive and negative predictive values of 89 and 96%, respectively. The efficiency of the PCA-based approach was particularly high among typical B-CLL, MCL and FL vs other B-CLPD cases. In summary, PCA-guided immunophenotypic classification of B-CLPD is a promising tool for standardized interpretation of tumor IP, their classification into well-defined entities and comprehensive evaluation of antibody panels.
    Leukemia: official journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K 02/2011; 25(2):385. DOI:10.1038/leu.2010.296 · 9.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Heavy chain diseases (HCDs) are rare B-cell lymphoproliferative neoplasias characterized by the production of a monoclonal component consisting of a truncated monoclonal Ig heavy chain without the associated light chain. Among them, patients with gamma-HCD are so rare that no more than 150 cases can be found in the literature. In this paper, we report one additional case: an 83-year-old man with a gamma-HCD, in whom a kappa light chain component was detected in the serum by using the serum free light-chain assessment and in addition monoclonal kappa cytoplasmic expression was detected in bone marrow plasma cells by flow cytometric analysis. In the work-up of the patient, the underlying anatomopathological lymphoproliferative disease corresponded to a lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, as it is stated in the current World Health Organization classification (2008), with both lymphadenopathic and bone marrow infiltration. As in other cases, several autoimmune manifestations (antiphospholipidic syndrome and immune thrombocytopenia) were present during the course of the disease in this patient. This case report illustrates a new case of gamma-HCD, in which serum free light-chain analysis and flow cytometry represented a valuable tool for diagnosis, a finding that could be very important for the future management of these patients.
    Annals of Clinical Biochemistry 10/2010; 47(Pt 6):570-2. DOI:10.1258/acb.2010.010146 · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A heterogeneous spectrum of immunophenotypic abnormalities have been reported in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, most studies are restricted to the analysis of CD34(+) cells and/or other major subsets of CD34(-) cells, frequently not exploring the diagnostic and prognostic impact of immunophenotyping. We propose for the first time an immunophenotypic score (IS) based on the altered distribution and immunophenotypic features of maturing/mature compartments of bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic cells in 56 patients with MDS that could contribute to a refined diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of the disease. Although MDS-associated phenotypes were detected in reactive BM, the overall immunophenotypic profile of BM cells allowed an efficient discrimination between MDS and both normal and reactive BM, once the number and degree of severity of the abnormalities detected per patient were simultaneously considered in the proposed IS. Interestingly, increasingly higher IS were found among patients with MDS showing adverse prognostic factors and in low- versus high-grade cases. The most informative prognostic factors included the number of CD34(+) cells, presence of aberrant CD34(-)/CD117(+) precursors, decreased mature neutrophils and CD34(-) erythroid precursors, and increased numbers of CD36(-/lo) erythroid precursors; in addition, the IS was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival. Assessment of immunophenotypic abnormalities of maturing/mature BM cells allows an efficient discrimination between MDS and both normal and reactive BM, once the number and degree of severity of the abnormalities detected are simultaneously scored. Interestingly, progressively higher IS were found among patients with MDS with adverse prognostic features and shorter overall survival.
    Cytometry Part B Clinical Cytometry 01/2010; 78(3):154-68. DOI:10.1002/cyto.b.20513 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Multiparameter flow cytometry has become an essential tool for monitoring response to therapy in hematological malignancies, including B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (B-CLPD). However, depending on the expertise of the operator minimal residual disease (MRD) can be misidentified, given that data analysis is based on the definition of expert-based bidimensional plots, where an operator selects the subpopulations of interest. Here, we propose and evaluate a probabilistic approach based on pattern classification tools and the Bayes theorem, for automated analysis of flow cytometry data from a group of 50 B-CLPD versus normal peripheral blood B-cells under MRD conditions, with the aim of reducing operator-associated subjectivity. The proposed approach provided a tool for MRD detection in B-CLPD by flow cytometry with a sensitivity of < or =8 x 10(-5) (median of < or =2 x 10(-7)). Furthermore, in 86% of B-CLPD cases tested, no events corresponding to normal B-cells were wrongly identified as belonging to the neoplastic B-cell population at a level of < or =10(-7). Thus, this approach based on the search for minimal numbers of neoplastic B-cells similar to those detected at diagnosis could potentially be applied with both a high sensitivity and specificity to investigate for the presence of MRD in virtually all B-CLPD. Further studies evaluating its efficiency in larger series of patients, where reactive conditions and non-neoplastic disorders are also included, are required to confirm these results.
    Cytometry Part A 12/2008; 73A(12):1141-50. DOI:10.1002/cyto.a.20638 · 3.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Immunophenotypic characterization of B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (B-CLPD) is associated with the use of increasingly larger panels of multiple combinations of 3 to > or =6 monoclonal antibodies (Mab), data analysis being separately performed for each of the different stained sample aliquots. Here, we describe and validate an automated method for calculation of flow cytometric data from several multicolor stainings of the same cell sample--i.e., the merging of data from different aliquots stained with partially overlapping combinations of Mab reagents (focusing on > or =1 cell populations)--into one data file as if it concerned a single "super" multicolor staining. Evaluation of the performance of the method described was done in a group of 60 B-CLPD studied at diagnosis with 18 different reagents in a panel containing six different 3- and 4-color stainings, which systematically contained CD19 for the identification of B-cells. Our results show a high degree of correlation and agreement between originally measured and calculated data about cell surface stainings, providing a basis for the use of this approach for the generation of flow cytometric data files containing information about a virtually infinite number of stainings for each individual cellular event measured in a sample, using a limited number of fluorochrome stainings.
    Cytometry Part A 09/2008; 73(9):834-46. DOI:10.1002/cyto.a.20608 · 3.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Occurrence of phenotypic abnormalities in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor and precursor cells (HPC) and their major B-cell and nonlymphoid compartments has been frequently reported in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Here, we analyze for the first time the numerical and phenotypic abnormalities of different maturation-associated subsets of bone marrow (BM) CD34(+) HPC from 50 newly diagnosed MDS patients in comparison to normal/reactive BM (n=29). Our results confirm the existence of heterogeneously altered phenotypes among CD34(+) HPC from MDS and indicate that such variability depends both on the relative distribution of the different subsets of CD34(+) HPC committed into the different myeloid and B-lymphoid compartments, and their immunophenotype (for example, higher reactivity for CD117 and CD13 and lower expression of CyMPO, CD64 and CD65 on CD34(+) immature and neutrophil precursors), a clear association existing between the accumulation of CD34(+) HPC and that of immature CD34(+) HPC. Interestingly, expansion of erythroid- and neutrophil-lineage CD34(+) cells is detected in low-grade MDS at the expense of CD34(+) plasmacytoid dendritic cell and B-cell precursors, while expansion of immature CD34(+) precursors occurs in high-grade MDS. On the basis of the number and severity of the phenotypic abnormalities detected, a scoring system is proposed that efficiently discriminates between normal/reactive and MDS CD34(+) HPC, the mean score significantly increasing from low- to high-grade MDS.
    Leukemia: official journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K 07/2008; 22(6):1175-83. DOI:10.1038/leu.2008.49 · 9.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Occurrence of phenotypic abnormalities in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor and precursor cells (HPC) and their major B-cell and nonlymphoid compartments has been frequently reported in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Here, we analyze for the first time the numerical and phenotypic abnormalities of different maturation-associated subsets of bone marrow (BM) CD34(+) HPC from 50 newly diagnosed MDS patients in comparison to normal/reactive BM (n=29). Our results confirm the existence of heterogeneously altered phenotypes among CD34(+) HPC from MDS and indicate that such variability depends both on the relative distribution of the different subsets of CD34(+) HPC committed into the different myeloid and B-lymphoid compartments, and their immunophenotype (for example, higher reactivity for CD117 and CD13 and lower expression of CyMPO, CD64 and CD65 on CD34(+) immature and neutrophil precursors), a clear association existing between the accumulation of CD34(+) HPC and that of immature CD34(+) HPC. Interestingly, expansion of erythroid- and neutrophil-lineage CD34(+) cells is detected in low-grade MDS at the expense of CD34(+) plasmacytoid dendritic cell and B-cell precursors, while expansion of immature CD34(+) precursors occurs in high-grade MDS. On the basis of the number and severity of the phenotypic abnormalities detected, a scoring system is proposed that efficiently discriminates between normal/reactive and MDS CD34(+) HPC, the mean score significantly increasing from low- to high-grade MDS.
    Leukemia: official journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K 07/2008; 22(6):1175-83. DOI:10.1038/leu.2008.49 · 9.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Limited knowledge exists about the impact of specific genetic abnormalities on the proliferation of neoplastic B cells from chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (B-CLPDs). Here we analyze the impact of cytogenetic abnormalities on the proliferation of neoplastic B cells in 432 B-CLPD patients, grouped according to diagnosis and site of sampling, versus their normal counterparts. Overall, proliferation of neoplastic B cells highly varied among the different B-CLPD subtypes, the greatest numbers of proliferating cells being identified in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and Burkitt lymphoma (BL). Compared with normal B cells, neoplastic B-CLPD cells showed significantly increased S + G(2)/M-phase values in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), BL, and some DLBCL cases. Conversely, decreased proliferation was observed in follicular lymphoma, lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia (LPL/WM), and some DLBCL patients; hairy cell leukemia, splenic marginal zone, and MALT-lymphoma patients showed S + G(2)/M phase values similar to normal mature B lymphocytes from LN. Interestingly, in B-CLL and MCL significantly higher percentages of S + G(2)/M cells were detected in BM versus PB and in LN versus BM and PB samples, respectively. In turn, presence of 14q32.3 gene rearrangements and DNA aneuploidy, was associated with a higher percentage of S + G(2)/M-phase cells among LPL/WM and B-CLL cases, respectively.
    Blood 06/2008; 111(10):5130-41. DOI:10.1182/blood-2007-10-119289 · 9.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is a well-defined clinical entity with heterogeneous molecular and cytogenetic features. Here, we analyze the impact of trisomy 12, del(13q), del(17p), and del(11q) as determined by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of purified neoplastic B-CLL cells on their immunophenotype, DNA ploidy status and proliferative rate.Overall, 111 of 180 (62%) B-CLL cases studied displayed one (50%) or more (12%) genetic abnormalities, del(13q) (35%) being more frequently detected than trisomy 12 (23%) followed by del(11q) (9%) and del(17p) (8%). Trisomy 12 was associated with a higher frequency of DNA aneuploidy, stronger expression of CD19, CD20, CD22, CD24, CD27, CD79b, CD38, and sIg and lower reactivity for CD43 with respect to cytogenetically nonaltered cases. In turn, cases with del(13q) displayed greater reactivity for CD20, FMC7, CD27, CD22, CD5, and bcl2, while del(11q) was associated with brighter expression of CD38, FMC7, CD25, and sIg. Hierarchical clustering analysis of the immunophenotype of B-CLL cases with cytogenetic abnormalities allowed the identification of three different groups of patients with increasing frequencies of trisomy 12, del(11q), and del(13q). Remarkably, none of the cytogenetic abnormalities analyzed except coexistence of 13q- and 17p- had a clear impact on the proliferative index of B-CLL cells.
    Cytometry Part B Clinical Cytometry 05/2008; 74(3):139-49. DOI:10.1002/cyto.b.20390 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: New cisplatin analogue carrying a cholic acid, complex [PtCl(UDC)(en)] (en = ethylenediamine, UDC = Ursodeoxycholate) has been synthesized from [PtCl2(en)] and characterized. This novel complex shows increased cytotoxicity against a cisplatin-resistant ovarian tumor cell line (CH1cisR) as compared with the parent compound cisDDP. Moreover, while cisplatin only exerts its activity over the G2/M population, [PtCl(UDC)(en)] seems to induce apoptosis both in cycling and resting cells. Intrinsically fluorescence at room temperature was observed for this platinum complex with a quantum yield Φ = 0.11. In order to achieve dynamic pictures of the biological effects of cisplatin analogues, it would be very interesting to have intrinsically fluorescent compounds with cytotoxic activity, especially against drug-resistant cell-lines.
    Letters in Drug Design &amp Discovery 06/2007; 4(5):341-345. DOI:10.2174/157018007780867898 · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    Leukemia 10/2005; 19(9):1708-9. DOI:10.1038/sj.leu.2403858 · 9.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tetraspanin proteins form signaling complexes between them and with other membrane proteins and modulate cell adhesion and migration properties. The surface expression of several tetraspanin antigens (CD9, CD37, CD53, CD63, and CD81), and their interacting proteins (CD19, CD21, and HLA-DR) were analyzed during normal B-cell maturation and compared to a group of 67 B-cell neoplasias. Three patterns of tetraspanin expression were identified in normal B cells. The first corresponded to bone marrow CD10(+) B-cell precursors (BCP) which showed high expression of CD81 and CD9, low reactivity for CD53 and negativity for CD37. CD10(-) B-lymphocytes showed downregulation of CD9/CD81 and upregulation of CD53/CD37. Plasma cells showed re-expressed CD9 and downregulated CD37. Hierarchical clustering analysis of flow cytometry immunophenotypic data showed a good correlation between the tumor differentiation stage and the pattern of tetraspanin expression, with all analyzed individual samples classified into three major groups, independently of their normal or neoplastic origin. Despite this, neoplastic B-cells frequently showed aberrantly high/low expression of the different markers analyzed. Interestingly, in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, abnormal expression of CD53 and CD9 were associated with different patterns of disease infiltration, which would support the role of these molecules on modulating adhesion and migration of neoplastic B cells.
    Leukemia 09/2005; 19(8):1376-83. DOI:10.1038/sj.leu.2403822 · 9.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Two square planar derivatives of Pt(en)Cl(2) with intrinsic fluorescence in aqueous solution at room temperature, with quantum yields (Phi) 0.11 and 0.10, respectively, have been synthesized and characterized as [Pt(en)(CG)Cl] (Complex 1) and [Pt(en)(CG)(2)] (Complex 2) (en = ethylenediamine, CG = cholylglycinate). Complexes 1 and 2 exchange just one ligand (chloride or cholylglycinate, respectively) when reacted with water or 5'-GMP to give the same chemical species. After reaction with DNA oligonucleotides or DNA plasmids, they show enhanced emission in the visible region, which lasts for long periods of time and makes them potentially useful DNA marker molecules. Incubation with nucleated blood cells followed by microscopic analyses revealed that they enter the cells within minutes of exposure, selectively stain the DNA, and persist after more than 48 h of exposure. Complexes 1 and 2 display cell cycle phase-independent cytotoxic activity against cisplatin-resistant CHO (Chinese hamster ovarian) tumor cells, with an early onset of their effects. Their slightly different biological effects, as compared to cisplatin, are considered to be linked to the bile acids and their vector properties and to the preferential formation of monoadducts.
    Bioconjugate Chemistry 03/2005; 16(2):275-82. DOI:10.1021/bc049788r · 4.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are heterogeneous disorders in which conflicting results in apoptosis and multidrug resistance (MDR) have been reported. We have evaluated by multiparameter flow cytometry the expression of apoptosis- (APO2.7, bcl-2, and bax) and MDR-related proteins [P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance protein (MRP), and lung resistance protein (LRP)] specifically on bone marrow (BM) CD34+ cells, and their major CD32-/dim and CD32+ subsets, in de novo AML (n=90), high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (n=9), and low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (n=21) patients at diagnosis, and compared with normal BM CD34+ cells (n=6). CD34+ myeloid cells from AML and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients displayed higher expression of bcl-2 (P <0.0001) and lower reactivity for APO2.7 (P=0.002) compared with low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome and normal controls. Similar results applied to the two predefined CD34+ myeloid cell subsets. No significant differences were found in the expression of P-gp, MRP, and LRP between low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients and normal BM, but decreased expression of MRP (P <0.03) in AML and high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and P-gp (P=0.008) in high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes were detected. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed that low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients were clustered next to normal BM samples, whereas high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes were clustered together and mixed with the de novo AML patients. In summary, increased resistance to chemotherapy of CD34+ cells from both AML and high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes would be explained more appropriately in terms of an increased antiapoptotic phenotype rather than a MDR phenotype. In low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes abnormally high apoptotic rates would be restricted to the CD34- cell compartments.
    Clinical Cancer Research 11/2004; 10(22):7599-606. DOI:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-04-0598 · 8.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lack of apoptosis has been linked to prolonged survival of malignant B cells expressing bcl-2. The aim of the present study was to analyze the amount of bcl-2 protein expressed along normal human B-cell maturation and to establish the frequency of aberrant bcl-2 expression in B-cell malignancies. In normal bone marrow (n=11), bcl-2 expression obtained by quantitative multiparametric flow cytometry was highly variable: very low in both CD34(+) and CD34(-) B-cell precursors, high in mature B-lymphocytes and very high in plasma cells. Bcl-2 expression of mature B-lymphocytes from peripheral blood (n=10), spleen (n=8) and lymph node (n=5) was significantly higher (P<0.02) in CD23(-) as compared to CD23(+) B cells, independent of the type of tissue analyzed. Upon comparison with normal human B-cell maturation, bcl-2 expression in neoplastic B cells from 144 patients was found to be aberrant in 66% of the cases, usually corresponding to bcl-2 overexpression (63%). Follicular lymphoma (FL) carrying t(14;18) and MALT lymphoma were the only diagnostic groups constantly showing overexpression of bcl-2. Bcl-2 overexpression was also frequently found in precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (84%), typical (77%) and atypical (75%) B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, prolymphocytic leukemia (two of three cases), mantle cell lymphoma (55%), but not in t(14;18)(-) FL, splenic marginal zone lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma and multiple myeloma.
    Leukemia 03/2004; 18(3):491-8. DOI:10.1038/sj.leu.2403231 · 9.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peer reviewed
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    ABSTRACT: Peer reviewed

Publication Stats

358 Citations
99.58 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004–2014
    • Universidad de Salamanca
      • Department of Medicine
      Helmantica, Castille and León, Spain
  • 2005
    • Spanish National Research Council
      • Instituto de Biología Molecular "Eladio Viñuela"
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain