Yoshifumi Kawarada

Mie University, Tu, Mie, Japan

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Publications (217)387.17 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Malignant pheochromocytoma accounts for approximately 10% of pheochromocytoma cases. The main site of distant metastasis is the liver. Hypertensive crisis due to catecholamine oversecretion is potentially fatal. We present a case of malignant pheochromocytoma with multiple liver metastases. A 60-year-old female with repeated hypertensive episodes was diagnosed with malignant pheochromocytoma. She underwent a left adrenalectomy and partial hepatectomy with resection of segment 6. Catecholamine levels remained high after surgery and she received repeated cycles of chemotherapy. Four months after surgery, multiple liver metastases were detected. In spite of ongoing chemotherapy, catecholamine levels eventually became uncontrollable. Serum and urine noradrenaline and vanillylmandelic acid levels increased, but adrenaline and dopamine levels stayed within the normal range. Preoperative liver imaging revealed multiple metastases in all segments except segment 4. Percutaneous transhepatic portal vein embolization (PTPE) of the right and lateral branches of the portal vein was performed. The functional liver volume of segment 4 increased after PTPE. Right hepatectomy, lateral segmentectomy and partial resection of segment 1 were performed 10 mo after the initial surgery. Intraoperative ultrasonography detected two small tumors in segment 4, which were treated with intraoperative microwave coagulation therapy. Noradrenaline levels normalized immediately after the second hepatectomy. As there was increased telomerase activity in the resected specimen, she received adjuvant chemotherapy. She remained in good health for 2 years. However, further metastases eventually occurred and she subsequently died due to a brain hemorrhage. Hepatectomy may be a therapeutic option for reduction of tumor mass in pheochromocytoma with liver metastases.
    11/2013; 5(11):309-13. DOI:10.4240/wjgs.v5.i11.309
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    ABSTRACT: The value of pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) with extended lymphadenectomy for pancreatic cancer has been evaluated by many retrospective studies and 3 randomized controlled trials (RCT). However, the protocols used and the results found in the 3 RCTs were diverse. Therefore, a multicenter RCT was proposed in 1998 to evaluate the primary end point of long-term survival and the secondary end points of morbidity, mortality and quality of life of patients undergoing standard versus extended lymphadenectomy in radical PD for pancreatic cancer. From March 2000 to May 2003, 112 patients with potentially curable pancreatic head cancer were enrolled and intraoperatively randomized to a standard or extended lymphadenectomy group. No resected patients received any adjuvant treatments. A hundred and one eligible patients were analyzed. Demographic and histopathological characteristics of the two groups were similar. The mean operating time, intraoperative blood loss and number of retrieved lymph nodes were greater in the extended group, but the other operative results were comparable. Although this multicenter RCT was conducted in a strict setting, extended lymphadenectomy in radical PD did not benefit long-term survival in patients with resectable pancreatic head cancer and led to levels of morbidity, mortality and quality of life comparable to those found after standard lymphadenectomy.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Sciences 10/2011; 19(3):230-41. DOI:10.1007/s00534-011-0466-6 · 2.31 Impact Factor
  • Yoshifumi Kawarada · Bidhan C Das · Masami Tabata · Shuji Isaji
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    ABSTRACT: The benefit of total resection of the dilated bile duct has remained unclear. We describe here our surgical management of 13 patients with type IV choledochal cysts. All six younger patients (25-35 years old) underwent resection of the extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) and hepaticojejunostomy (HJ), whereas three of the seven older patients (50-68 years old) underwent resection of the EHBD resection and HJ, with the remaining four older patients undergoing total resection of the dilated bile duct and removal of a pancreatobiliary maljunction (PBMJ) in the form of a S4a+S5 hepatectomy (so-called Taj Mahal) and/or pancreas head resection with second portion pancreaticoduodenectomy. No malignancies were detected in the dilated bile duct after resection in the younger patients, but cancer of the gallbladder and/or the dilated bile duct was found in two (27.5%) of the older patients. No cancers were detected during the long-term follow up (1974-2008) in those patients who underwent EHBD resection plus partial hepatectomy, but cancer developed in the remnant duct in one of the older patients who underwent EHBD resection alone. Based on our findings, we recommend that type IV choledochal cysts should be treated by total excision of the dilated bile duct, including the PBMJ, due to its frequent association with malignancy, and to prevent the development of cancer in the remnant duct and improve the long-term survival rate.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 05/2009; 16(5):684-7. DOI:10.1007/s00534-009-0052-3 · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 74-year-old woman presented with symptoms consistent with hyperadrenocorticism and hyperca-techolaminism. She had a cushingoid appearance and her cortisol level was elevated. Her serum dopamine and noradrenalin levels were also elevated. Computed tomography detected a left adrenal mass measuring 3.5 cm multiply 3.0 cm in diameter. Metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy was negative. Unexpectedly, the serum Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level was elevated. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed increased uptake in the adrenal tumor only, with a maximum standardized uptake value of 2.8. Selective venography and blood sampling revealed that the concentrations of cortisol, catecholamines and CEA were significantly elevated in the vein draining the tumor. A diagnosis of CEA-producing benign adenoma was made. After preoperative management, we performed a combined lateral and anterior transperitoneal laparoscopic adrenectomy. Her vital signs remained stable during surgery. Histopathological examination revealed a benign adenoma. Her cortisol, catecholamine and CEA levels normalized immediately after surgery. We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of CEA-producing adrenal adenoma, along with a review of the relevant literature, and discuss our laparoscopic surgery techniques.
    World Journal of Gastroenterology 01/2008; 13(45):6094-7. DOI:10.3748/wjg.13.6094 · 2.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The principal management of acute cholecystitis is early cholecystectomy. However, percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGBD) may be preferable for patients with moderate (grade II) or severe (grade III) acute cholecystitis. For patients with moderate (grade II) disease, PTGBD should be applied only when they do not respond to conservative treatment. For patients with severe (grade III) disease, PTGBD is recommended with intensive care. Percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder aspiration (PTGBA) is a simple alternative drainage method with fewer complications; however, its clinical usefulness has been shown only by case-series studies. To clarify the clinical value of these drainage methods, proper randomized trials should be done. This article describes techniques of drainage for acute cholecystitis.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):46-51. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1155-8 · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Antimicrobial agents should be administered to all patients with suspected acute cholangitis as a priority as soon as possible. Bile cultures should be performed at the earliest opportunity. The important factors which should be considered in selecting antimicrobial therapy include the agent's activity against potentially infecting bacteria, the severity of the cholangitis, the presence or absence of renal and hepatic diseases, the patient's recent history of antimicrobial therapy, and any recent culture results, if available. Biliary penetration of the microbial agents should also be considered in the selection of antimicrobials, but activity against the infecting isolates is of greatest importance. If the causative organisms are identified, empirically chosen antimicrobial drugs should be replaced by narrower-spectrum antimicrobial agents, the most appropriate for the species and the site of the infection.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):59-67. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1157-6 · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A systematic review of references conducted in the process of developing the Guidelines for the Management of Acute Cholangitis and Cholecystitis did not find many high-quality research reports. There were no criteria for diagnosis, severity assessment, or patient transfer, and no established principles of clinical practice guidelines for acute cholangitis and cholecystitis. In order to develop guidelines that would be useful in clinical practice, an understanding of the current status of clinical practice for acute cholangitis and cholecystitis was considered essential. After several open symposia and a survey of these two diseases, we developed and published a Japanese-language version of Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines for the Management of Acute Cholangitis and Cholecystitis. In order to prepare international Guidelines, we had repeated discussions about the draft Guidelines together with international experts, and, following the Consensus Meeting, held on April 1-2, 2006, in Tokyo, with the attendance of 300 world experts in the field, the International Guidelines for the Management of Acute Cholangitis and Cholecystitis were developed. In this article, we outline the comments and opinions given at the International Meeting and how they are reflected in the final version of the Guidelines.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):114-21. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1163-8 · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this article is to propose new criteria for the diagnosis and severity assessment of acute cholecystitis, based on a systematic review of the literature and a consensus of experts. A working group reviewed articles with regard to the diagnosis and treatment of acute cholecystitis and extracted the best current available evidence. In addition to the evidence and face-to-face discussions, domestic consensus meetings were held by the experts in order to assess the results. A provisional outcome statement regarding the diagnostic criteria and criteria for severity assessment was discussed and finalized during an International Consensus Meeting held in Tokyo 2006. Patients exhibiting one of the local signs of inflammation, such as Murphy's sign, or a mass, pain or tenderness in the right upper quadrant, as well as one of the systemic signs of inflammation, such as fever, elevated white blood cell count, and elevated C-reactive protein level, are diagnosed as having acute cholecystitis. Patients in whom suspected clinical findings are confirmed by diagnostic imaging are also diagnosed with acute cholecystitis. The severity of acute cholecystitis is classified into three grades, mild (grade I), moderate (grade II), and severe (grade III). Grade I (mild acute cholecystitis) is defined as acute cholecystitis in a patient with no organ dysfunction and limited disease in the gallbladder, making cholecystectomy a low-risk procedure. Grade II (moderate acute cholecystitis) is associated with no organ dysfunction but there is extensive disease in the gallbladder, resulting in difficulty in safely performing a cholecystectomy. Grade II disease is usually characterized by an elevated white blood cell count; a palpable, tender mass in the right upper abdominal quadrant; disease duration of more than 72 h; and imaging studies indicating significant inflammatory changes in the gallbladder. Grade III (severe acute cholecystitis) is defined as acute cholecystitis with organ dysfunction.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):78-82. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1159-4 · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute cholecystitis consists of various morbid conditions, ranging from mild cases that are relieved by the oral administration of antimicrobial drugs or that resolve even without antimicrobials to severe cases complicated by biliary peritonitis. Microbial cultures should be performed by collecting bile at all available opportunities to identify both aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Empirically selected antimicrobials should be administered. Antimicrobial activity against potential causative organisms, the severity of the cholecystitis, the patient's past history of antimicrobial therapy, and local susceptibility patterns (antibiogram) must be taken into consideration in the choice of antimicrobial drugs. In mild cases which closely mimic biliary colic, the administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is recommended to prevent the progression of inflammation (recommendation grade A). When causative organisms are identified, the antimicrobial drug should be changed for a narrower-spectrum antimicrobial agent on the basis of the species and their susceptibility testing results.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):83-90. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1160-y · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article discusses the definitions, pathophysiology, and epidemiology of acute cholangitis and cholecystitis. Acute cholangitis and cholecystitis mostly originate from stones in the bile ducts and gallbladder. Acute cholecystitis also has other causes, such as ischemia; chemicals that enter biliary secretions; motility disorders associated with drugs; infections with microorganisms, protozoa, and parasites; collagen disease; and allergic reactions. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is associated with a recent operation, trauma, burns, multisystem organ failure, and parenteral nutrition. Factors associated with the onset of cholelithiasis include obesity, age, and drugs such as oral contraceptives. The reported mortality of less than 10% for acute cholecystitis gives an impression that it is not a fatal disease, except for the elderly and/or patients with acalculous disease. However, there are reports of high mortality for cholangitis, although the mortality differs greatly depending on the year of the report and the severity of the disease. Even reports published in and after the 1980s indicate high mortality, ranging from 10% to 30% in the patients, with multiorgan failure as a major cause of death. Because many of the reports on acute cholecystitis and cholangitis use different standards, comparisons are difficult. Variations in treatment and risk factors influencing the mortality rates indicate the necessity for standardized diagnostic, treatment, and severity assessment criteria.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):15-26. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1152-y · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There are no evidence-based-criteria for the diagnosis, severity assessment, of treatment of acute cholecystitis or acute cholangitis. For example, the full complement of symptoms and signs described as Charcot's triad and as Reynolds' pentad are infrequent and as such do not really assist the clinician with planning management strategies. In view of these factors, we launched a project to prepare evidence-based guidelines for the management of acute cholangitis and cholecystitis that will be useful in the clinical setting. This research has been funded by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare, in cooperation with the Japanese Society for Abdominal Emergency Medicine, the Japan Biliary Association, and the Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery. A working group, consisting of 46 experts in gastroenterology, surgery, internal medicine, emergency medicine, intensive care, and clinical epidemiology, analyzed and examined the literature on patients with cholangitis and cholecystitis in order to produce evidence-based guidelines. During the investigations we found that there was a lack of high-level evidence, for treatments, and the working group formulated the guidelines by obtaining consensus, based on evidence categorized by level, according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence of May 2001 (version 1). This work required more than 20 meetings to obtain a consensus on each item from the working group. Then four forums were held to permit examination of the Guideline details in Japan, both by an external assessment committee and by the working group participants (version 2). As we knew that the diagnosis and management of acute biliary infection may differ from country to country, we appointed a publication committee and held 12 meetings to prepare draft Guidelines in English (version 3). We then had several discussions on these draft guidelines with leading experts in the field throughout the world, via e-mail, leading to version 4. Finally, an International Consensus Meeting took place in Tokyo, on 1-2 April, 2006, to obtain international agreement on diagnostic criteria, severity assessment, and management.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):1-10. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1150-0 · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biliary decompression and drainage done in a timely manner is the cornerstone of acute cholangitis treatment. The mortality rate of acute cholangitis was extremely high when no interventional procedures, other than open drainage, were available. At present, endoscopic drainage is the procedure of first choice, in view of its safety and effectiveness. In patients with severe (grade III) disease, defined according to the severity assessment criteria in the Guidelines, biliary drainage should be done promptly with respiration management, while patients with moderate (grade II) disease also need to undergo drainage promptly with close monitoring of their responses to the primary care. For endoscopic drainage, endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD) or stent placement procedures are performed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have reported no difference in the drainage effect of these two procedures, but case-series studies have indicated the frequent occurrence of hemorrhage associated with endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST), and complications such as pancreatitis. Although the usefulness of percutaneous transhepatic drainage is supported by the case-series studies, its lower success rate and higher complication rates makes it a second-option procedure.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):35-45. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1154-9 · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cholecystectomy has been widely performed in the treatment of acute cholecystitis, and laparoscopic cholecystectomy has been increasingly adopted as the method of surgery over the past 15 years. Despite the success of laparoscopic cholecystectomy as an elective treatment for symptomatic gallstones, acute cholecystitis was initially considered a contraindication for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The reasons for it being considered a contraindication were the technical difficulty of performing it in acute cholecystitis and the development of complications, including bile duct injury, bowel injury, and hepatic injury. However, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is now accepted as being safe for acute cholecystitis, when surgeons who are expert at the laparoscopic technique perform it. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has been found to be superior to open cholecystectomy as a treatment for acute cholecystitis because of a lower incidence of complications, shorter length of postoperative hospital stay, quicker recuperation, and earlier return to work. However, laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis has not become routine, because the timing and approach to the surgical management in patients with acute cholecystitis is still a matter of controversy. These Guidelines describe the timing of and the optimal surgical treatment of acute cholecystitis in a question-and-answer format.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):91-7. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1161-x · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biliary drainage is a radical method to relieve cholestasis, a cause of acute cholangitis, and takes a central part in the treatment of acute cholangitis. Emergent drainage is essential for severe cases, whereas patients with moderate and mild disease should also receive drainage as soon as possible if they do not respond to conservative treatment, and their condition has not improved. Biliary drainage can be achieved via three different routes/procedures: endoscopic, percutaneous transhepatic, and open methods. The clinical value of both endoscopic and percutaneous transhepatic drainage is well known. Endoscopic drainage is associated with a low morbidity rate and shorter duration of hospitalization; therefore, this approach is advocated whenever it is applicable. In endoscopic drainage, either endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD) or tube stent placement can be used. There is no significant difference in the success rate, effectiveness, and morbidity between the two procedures. The decision to perform endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) is made based on the patient's condition and the number and diameter of common bile duct stones. Open drainage, on the other hand, should be applied only in patients for whom endoscopic or percutaneous transhepatic drainage is contraindicated or has not been successfully performed. Cholecystectomy is recommended in patients with gallbladder stones, following the resolution of acute cholangitis with medical treatment, unless the patient has poor operative risk factors or declines surgery.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):68-77. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1158-5 · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Unusual cases of acute cholecystitis and cholangitis include (1) pediatric biliary tract infections, (2) geriatric biliary tract infections, (3) acalculous cholecystitis, (4) acute and intrahepatic cholangitis accompanying hepatolithiasis (5) acute biliary tract infection accompanying malignant pancreatic-biliary tumor, (6) postoperative biliary tract infection, (7) acute biliary tract infection accompanying congenital biliary dilatation and pancreaticobiliary maljunction, and (8) primary sclerosing cholangitis. Pediatric biliary tract infection is characterized by great differences in causes from those of adult acute biliary tract infection, and severe cases should be immediately referred to a specialist pediatric surgical unit. Because biliary tract infection in elderly patients, who often have serious systemic conditions and complications, is likely to progress to a serious form, early surgery or biliary drainage is necessary. Acalculous cholangitis, which often occurs in patients with serious concomitant conditions, such as those in intensive care units (ICUs) and those with disturbed cardiac, pulmonary, and nephric function, has a high mortality and poor prognosis. Cholangitis accompanying hepatolithiasis includes recurrent pyogenic cholangitis, an epidemic disease in Southeast Asia. Biliary tract infections, which often occur after a biliary tract operation and treatment of the biliary tract, may have a fatal outcome, and should be carefully observed. The causes of acute cholangitis associated with pancreaticobiliary maljunction differ before and after operation. Direct cholangiography is most useful in the diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis. If cholangiography visualizes a typical bile duct, differentiation from acute pyogenic cholangitis is easy. This article discusses the individual characteristics, diagnostic criteria, treatment guidelines, and prognosis of these unusual types of biliary tract infection.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):98-113. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1162-9 · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for acute biliary inflammation/infection (acute cholangitis and acute cholecystitis), according to severity grade, have not yet been established in the world. Therefore we formulated flowcharts for the management of acute biliary inflammation/infection in accordance with severity grade. For mild (grade I) acute cholangitis, medical treatment may be sufficient/appropriate. For moderate (grade II) acute cholangitis, early biliary drainage should be performed. For severe (grade III) acute cholangitis, appropriate organ support such as ventilatory/circulatory management is required. After hemodynamic stabilization is achieved, urgent endoscopic or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage should be performed. For patients with acute cholangitis of any grade of severity, treatment for the underlying etiology, including endoscopic, percutaneous, or surgical treatment should be performed after the patient's general condition has improved. For patients with mild (grade I) cholecystitis, early laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the preferred treatment. For patients with moderate (grade II) acute cholecystitis, early laparoscopic or open cholecystectomy is preferred. In patients with extensive local inflammation, elective cholecystectomy is recommended after initial management with percutaneous gallbladder drainage and/or cholecystostomy. For the patient with severe (grade III) acute cholecystitis, multiorgan support is a critical part of management. Biliary peritonitis due to perforation of the gallbladder is an indication for urgent cholecystectomy and/or drainage. Delayed elective cholecystectomy may be performed after initial treatment with gallbladder drainage and improvement of the patient's general medical condition.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):27-34. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1153-x · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Because acute cholangitis sometimes rapidly progresses to a severe form accompanied by organ dysfunction, caused by the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and/or sepsis, prompt diagnosis and severity assessment are necessary for appropriate management, including intensive care with organ support and urgent biliary drainage in addition to medical treatment. However, because there have been no standard criteria for the diagnosis and severity assessment of acute cholangitis, practical clinical guidelines have never been established. The aim of this part of the Tokyo Guidelines is to propose new criteria for the diagnosis and severity assessment of acute cholangitis based on a systematic review of the literature and the consensus of experts reached at the International Consensus Meeting held in Tokyo 2006. Acute cholangitis can be diagnosed if the clinical manifestations of Charcot's triad, i.e., fever and/or chills, abdominal pain (right upper quadrant or epigastric), and jaundice are present. When not all of the components of the triad are present, then a definite diagnosis can be made if laboratory data and imaging findings supporting the evidence of inflammation and biliary obstruction are obtained. The severity of acute cholangitis can be classified into three grades, mild (grade I), moderate (grade II), and severe (grade III), on the basis of two clinical factors, the onset of organ dysfunction and the response to the initial medical treatment. "Severe (grade III)" acute cholangitis is defined as acute cholangitis accompanied by at least one new-onset organ dysfunction. "Moderate (grade II)" acute cholangitis is defined as acute cholangitis that is unaccompanied by organ dysfunction, but that does not respond to the initial medical treatment, with the clinical manifestations and/or laboratory data not improved. "Mild (grade I)" acute cholangitis is defined as acute cholangitis that responds to the initial medical treatment, with the clinical findings improved.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):52-8. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1156-7 · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Tokyo Guidelines formulate clinical guidance for healthcare providers regarding the diagnosis, severity assessment, and treatment of acute cholangitis and acute cholecystitis. The Guidelines were developed through a comprehensive literature search and selection of evidence. Recommendations were based on the strength and quality of evidence. Expert consensus opinion was used to enhance or formulate important areas where data were insufficient. A working group, composed of gastroenterologists and surgeons with expertise in biliary tract surgery, supplemented with physicians in critical care medicine, epidemiology, and laboratory medicine, was selected to formulate draft guidelines. Several other groups (including members of the Japanese Society for Abdominal Emergency Medicine, the Japan Biliary Association, and the Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery) have reviewed and revised the draft guidelines. To build a global consensus on the management of acute biliary infection, an international expert panel, representing experts in this area, was established. Between April 1 and 2, 2006, an International Consensus Meeting on acute biliary infections was held in Tokyo. A consensus was determined based on best available scientific evidence and discussion by the panel of experts. This report describes the highlights of the Tokyo International Consensus Meeting in 2006. Some important areas focused on at the meeting include proposals for internationally accepted diagnostic criteria and severity assessment for both clinical and research purposes.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2007; 14(1):11-4. DOI:10.1007/s00534-006-1151-z · 1.60 Impact Factor
  • Nippon Shokakibyo Gakkai zasshi The Japanese journal of gastro-enterology 11/2006; 103(10):1113-8.
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    ABSTRACT: The health insurance system in Japan is based upon the Universal Medical Care Insurance System, which gives all citizens the right to join an insurance scheme of their own choice, as guaranteed by the provisions of Article 25 of the Constitution of Japan, which states: "All people shall have the right to maintain the minimum standards of wholesome and cultured living." The health care system in Japan includes national medical insurance, nursing care for the elderly, and government payments for the treatment of intractable diseases. Medical insurance provisions are handled by Employee's Health Insurance (Social Insurance), which mainly covers employees of private companies and their families, and by National Health Insurance, which provides for the needs of self-employed people. Both schemes have their own medical care service programs for retired persons and their families. The health care system for the elderly covers people 75 years of age and over and bedridden people 65 years of age and over. There is also a system under which the government pays all or part of medical expenses, and/or pays medical expenses not covered by insurance. This is referred to collectively as the "medical expenses payment system" and includes the provision of medical assistance for specified intractable diseases. Because severe acute pancreatitis has a high mortality rate, it is specified as an intractable disease. In order to lower the mortality rate of various diseases, including severe acute pancreatitis, the specification system has been adopted by the government. The cost of treatment for severe acute pancreatitis is paid in full by the government from the date the application is made for a certificate verifying that the patient has an intractable disease.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2006; 13(1):7-9. DOI:10.1007/s00534-005-1046-4 · 1.60 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
387.17 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1978–2011
    • Mie University
      • • First Department of Surgery
      • • Department of Hepatobiliary Pancreatic and Transplant Surgery
      • • School of Medicine
      • • Faculty of Medicine
      • • Department of Surgery
      Tu, Mie, Japan