O F Njokanma

Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Eko, Lagos, Nigeria

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Publications (32)20.4 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Acute soft head syndrome is rare complications seen in children with sickle cell anaemia. A case report of a child with sickle cell anaemia who developed acute soft head syndrome. A 12-year old known sickle cell anaemia patient presented with acute, rapidly progressive skull pain and swelling, manifestations indicative of the rare complication of SCD which is called acute soft head syndrome. Conservative treatment with intravenous fluids and analgesics and empirical use of broad-spectrum antibiotics resulted in recovery. Acute soft head syndrome is a rare complication in children with sickle cell anaemia probably related to skull infarction. It further draws attention to the importance of acute soft head syndrome as a differential to be considered for pains in the head and skull swellings in children with sickle cell anaemia.
    Indian Journal of Hematology and Blood Transfusion 09/2014; · 0.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Sickle cell anemia may affect linear growth, and complications like avascular necrosis of femoral head may make direct measurement of height difficult. Objective: To determine the relationship between height and arm span as well as between height and sitting height among children with sickle cell anemia in Lagos, Nigeria. Methodology: A random sample of 200 children aged 8 months to 15 years were studied-100 with hemoglobin genotype SS and 100 with hemoglobin genotype AA, matched for age and sex. Height/length, sitting height, and arm span were measured. Correlations and regression analysis were performed to test the relationship between height as a dependent variable and the sitting height and arm span as independent variables. Results: Height, arm span, and sitting height were slightly but not significantly lower in subjects with sickle cell anemia. Strong correlations (R ≥ 0.95) were observed between height and other measurements in both subgroups. Regression analysis with height as the independent variable showed that arm span had a higher coefficient of determination than sitting height in both subjects (R(2) = 0.94 vs 0.899) and controls (R(2) = 0.942 vs 0.940). On the other hand, sitting height had a lower mean difference between observed and predicted height (0.04 and -0.11, respectively). Conclusion: Sitting height may be the preferred proxy for height in children with sickle cell anemia.
    Journal of the American College of Nutrition 06/2014; · 1.74 Impact Factor
  • Idowu Odunayo Senbanjo, Kazeem Adeola Oshikoya, Olisamedua Fidelis Njokanma
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    ABSTRACT: Upper arm composition is a reflection of body protein and calorie reserves. However, there is a paucity of data on upper arm composition of children from African countries, including Nigeria. This study aimed to determine the composition of upper arm and nutritional status of school children in Abeokuta, Nigeria and to compare with international reference standards. The sensitivity and specifi city of upper arm muscle area by height (UAMAH) as a nutritional assessment tool was also determined. Five hundred and seventy children aged 5 to 19 years were selected from seven schools using multistage random sampling. Weight, height, mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) and triceps skin fold thickness (TSF) were measured. Body mass index, upper arm muscle area (UAMA), upper arm fat area (UAFA), fat percentage and UAMAH were derived. The TSF, UAFA and fat percentage were significantly higher in females than males at each age group. MUAC and UAMA were significantly higher in female children aged 10-14 years, whereas UAMA was significantly higher in male children aged 15-19 years. UAMA and UAFA of the children were lower than those of Americans but similar to those of Zimbabweans, and higher than those of Indians. The sensitivity and specificity of UAMAH for detecting wasting were 80.8% and 63.9%, respectively, whereas the corresponding values for stunting were 32.2% and 58.2%, respectively. The school children studied have a combination of poor calorie and protein reserve. UAMAH may be a valuable tool for complete evaluation of the nutritional status of school children.
    World Journal of Pediatrics 03/2014; · 1.08 Impact Factor
  • Idowu O Senbanjo, Kazeem A Oshikoya, Olisamedua F Njokanma
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    ABSTRACT: There is limited knowledge about the associations of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections in developing countries. This study aimed to determine the current prevalence and associations of H. pylori infection with breastfeeding practices, nutritional status, and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in a group of apparently healthy children and adolescents in Lagos, Nigeria. This was a prospective hospital-based study conducted at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital that involved 118 children who came to the hospital for routine pediatric care. Seroprevalence status of the children was determined by measuring immunoglobulin G antibodies against H. pylori using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Seventy-five (63.6%) children were seropositive for H. pylori. The prevalence of H. pylori infection increased significantly from 40.4% in children less than five years of age to 85.1% at six to ten years of age (χ(2) = 20.9, p < 0.001). H. pylori infection was associated with low social class (OR = 3.24; 95% CI = 1.20-8.23, p = 0.016) and with RAP (OR = 3.47; 95% CI = 1.55-7.79, p = 0.002), but no association was observed with exclusive breastfeeding, duration of breastfeeding, and under-nutrition. The prevalence of H. pylori infection is high, particularly among children from low socioeconomic backgrounds in Lagos, Nigeria. It is associated with RAP. The effect of this infection on children's health requires further studies.
    The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries 01/2014; 8(4):448-53. · 1.00 Impact Factor
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    Samuel Olufemi Akodu, Olisamedua Fidelis Njokanma, Omolara Adeolu Kehinde
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Sickle cell disorders are known to have a negative effect on linear growth. This could potentially affect proportional growth and, hence, Cormic Index. Objective. To determine the Cormic Index in the sickle cell anaemia population in Lagos. Methodology. A consecutive sample of 100 children with haemoglobin genotype SS, aged eight months to 15 years, and 100 age and sex matched controls (haemoglobin genotype AA) was studied. Sitting height (upper segment) and full length or height were measured. Sitting height was then expressed as a percentage of full length/height (Cormic Index). Results. The mean Cormic Index decreased with age among primary subjects (SS) and AA controls. The overall mean Cormic Index among primary subjects was comparable to that of controls (55.0 ± 4.6% versus 54.5 ± 5.2%; 54.8 ± 4.5% versus 53.6 ± 4.9%) in boys and girls, respectively. In comparison with AA controls, female children with sickle cell anaemia who were older than 10 years had a significantly lower mean Cormic Index. Conclusion. There was a significant negative relationship between Cormic Index and height in subjects and controls irrespective of gender. Similarly, a significant negative correlation existed between age, sitting height, subischial leg length, weight, and Cormic Index in both subjects and controls.
    Anemia 01/2014; 2014:312302.
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    ABSTRACT: Congenital heart disease contributes significantly to the health burden of children in Nigeria. Interventions for congenital heart disease have been available in the developed world since the first report on device closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in 1967 by Porstmann. However, this did not start in Nigeria until October 2010. This study aimed to document the profiles of the patients who had undergone interventions for congenital heart diseases since the availability of the procedure, the challenges encountered, and the prospects associated with the interventions at the study site. All the patients referred to undergo interventions for congenital heart disease at the study center between October 2010 and 2012 were studied. The profile of the patient, including diagnosis at referral, indication for interventions, and interventions performed, were documented. The patients ranged in age from 3 to 62 years (mean age, 13.54 ± 17.7 years), and the male-to-female ratio was 1:3. The diagnosis at referral included PDA in 10 (83 %) of the 12 patients and secundum atrial septal defect in 2 patients (17 %). They all had transcatheter closure of the defects. Interventional procedures for congenital heart diseases currently are available locally, but the high degree of manpower training required, the cost, and the local availability of consumables are major factors limiting their use. Regional and international collaboration could be mutually beneficial.
    Pediatric Cardiology 07/2013; · 1.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of obesity is increasing in children and adolescents even in resource-poor countries. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of obesity in a group of Nigerian school children using triceps skin-fold thickness (SFT) and body mass index (BMI). The subjects were 1235 randomly selected primary and secondary Lagos school children aged 5–18 years, triceps SFT was measured with Harpenden® calipers and BMI calculated from weight and height. Using BMI, overweight and obesity were defined as values of 85th to 94th percentile for age and sex and ≥95th percentile, respectively. Using triceps SFT, obesity was defined as SFT > 85th percentile of the NHANES III study. Fifty-seven subjects (15 boys and 42 girls) had SFT > 85th percentile with a higher prevalence in girls than boys (6.4% vs. 2.6%, P = 0.001). The prevalence of BMI-defined overweight and obesity were also higher among girls (11.9% vs. 5.7%, P < 0.001 and 4.7% vs. 2.2%, P = 0.02, respectively). Females of upper socioeconomic class were more likely to be overweight (16.2% vs. 6.6%, P < 0.0001), obese (6.3% vs. 2.8%, P = 0.03) or have elevated SFT (8.2% vs. 4.2%, P = 0.03) than those of low socioeconomic status. Forty-seven of 57 subjects (82.5%) with elevated SFT also had high BMI. The prevalence of obesity is low in the study population but the much higher prevalence of overweight suggests that steps should be taken to control fatness before the figures worsen. In more than 80% of subjects, elevated SFT co-existed with elevated BMI.
    Clinical Obesity. 06/2013; 3(3-4).
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    ABSTRACT: Excessive central fat in children and adolescents is a risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. This study aimed to compare the body fat distribution patterns of children and adolescents in Abeokuta, Nigeria with international reference standards. Five hundred seventy children aged 5 to 19 years were selected from seven schools using multistage random sampling. Weight, height, triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness (TSF, SSF), and circumference at the waist and hips (WC, HC) were measured. Body mass index (BMI), subscapular:triceps skinfold ratio (STR), waist:hip circumference ratio (WHR), and waist: height ratio (WHtR) were derived. Females had higher mean BMI, TSF, SSF, WC, HC, WHR, and WHtR, while males had significantly higher STR. The mean BMI, WC, TSF, and SSF values were lower for our subjects than for African-American subjects at all ages. On the other hand, in both sexes, STR was higher among Nigerian than African-American subjects up to 12 years old. Thereafter the values were similar. The mean WC was similar to those reported for African-American males up to 8 years, and females up to 7 years of age; thereafter, African-American had higher values. The prevalence of central obesity using WC and WHtR measures was 4.4% and 5.8%, respectively. There is a need to validate each index against serum lipid profiles and other cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    American Journal of Physical Anthropology 02/2013; · 2.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Iron status in patients with sickle cell anaemia is a matter of continuing investigation. Objective. This paper aims to determine the serum iron status of under-five, sickle cell anaemia patients. Methods. The study spanned from December 2009 to February 2010 at the Consultant Outpatient Clinics involving 97 HbSS subjects and 97 age- and sex-matched HbAA controls. Biochemical iron status was assayed in subjects and controls. Results. Age range of the children was seven months to five years, with a mean of 30.6 (±15.97) months. Irrespective of gender, mean serum iron values were higher in HbAA controls than their HbSS counterparts but the observed difference was not significant (P = 0.299 and 0.111, resp.). The mean total iron binding capacity values of males and females were also not significantly different for sickle cell anaemia subjects and controls (P > 0.05). Males and females with HbAA had significantly lower serum ferritin when compared with their HbSS counterparts. Irrespective of gender, mean transferrin saturation was lower in HbSS subjects but the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Children with sickle cell anaemia have higher serum ferritin than controls, implying relatively higher iron content in the reticuloendothelial cells.
    Anemia 01/2013; 2013:254765.
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    ABSTRACT: The frequent need for blood transfusion in children with SCA creates the impression that IDA is rare in this class of children. The objective of the study is to determine the prevalence of IDA in a population of under-five children with SCA in Lagos, Nigeria. Serum iron, total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation and serum ferritin were assayed in 97 under-five children with SCAand 97 age/sex matched controls. THE DIAGNOSIS OF IDA WAS ESTABLISHED BASED ON THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA: haemoglobin <11.0 g/dl plus two or more of the following: MCV <70fl, transferrin saturation (Ts) <16% or serum ferritin (SF) <25ng/dL. Overall prevalence of IDA was significantly higher among AA controls. In the younger age group, the prevalence of IDA was significantly higher among HbAA controls while in the older age group the odds of having IDA was three times higher among HbSS subjects but the difference was not statistically significant. Two of the three SCA children with IDA have history of previous blood transfusion. IDA is uncommon in pre-school aged children with SCA. A multi-centre study is necessary to yield large number of transfused subjects to examine the effects of blood transfusion on prevalence of IDA.
    Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases 01/2013; 5(1):e2013069.
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ulcerative colitis (UC) is uncommon in the tropics and sub-tropics. We report a case of UC in a 7 year old girl whose parents were both Nigerians. This report is to alert healthcare professionals in sub-Saharan Africa that UC is not a rare health problem, especially in children. CASE PRESENTATION: The patient presented with frequent passage of blood stained stool, abdominal pain and significant weight loss. The diagnosis was entertained after she was investigated for common causes of chronic diarrhea in our setting and the findings were negative. The patient symptoms abated after she was commenced on steroid therapy. CONCLUSION: Under-diagnosis and misdiagnosis may account for a dearth of information on UC in African children.
    BMC Research Notes 10/2012; 5(1):564.
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    ABSTRACT: Since the first report on device closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) by Porstmann et al in 1967, the procedure has gained wide acceptance and has been used all over the world, including parts of Africa. The advantages when compared to surgical closure include shorter procedure time and hospital stay and no scar being left. This mode of treatment was not available in Nigeria prior to this with patients having to travel abroad to benefit. Cardiac catheterisation laboratory became available in Lagos, Nigeria in 2009 and in October 2010, the laboratory collaborated with Lagos State University College of Medicine (LASUCOM) and Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), to perform a device closure on a 3-year old girl with PDA who had presented to LASUTH with heart failure at the age of 6 months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the procedure has been performed in Nigeria The patient made a successful recovery and is haemodynamically stable, on no medications. Device closure of PDA is now safe and available in Nigeria.
    African journal of medicine and medical sciences 09/2012; 41(3):327-30.
  • Samuel Olufemi Akodu, Ijeoma Nnenna Diaku-Akinwumi, Olisamedua Fidelis Njokanma
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    ABSTRACT: Children with sickle cell anemia are vulnerable to growth deficits; thus, it would be thought that obesity would be rare among them. The objective of the study is to examine the prevalence of obesity in a sickle cell anemia population in Lagos. A random sample of children with sickle cell anemia aged 2-15 years was interviewed and anthropometric measurements including weight and height were taken. Their body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Participants were classified as obese or not obese by their BMI or weight-for-height-for-age using World Health Organization standard definitions. The overall prevalence of obesity was 2.5% and 3.8% among hemoglobin genotype SS subjects and hemoglobin genotype AA controls, respectively. The age-specific prevalence for obesity was highest among the adolescent age category in hemoglobin genotype AA controls and the childhood age category in subjects with sickle cell anemia. All the obese subjects with sickle cell anemia were from upper socioeconomic strata, while two and one of the three subjects with hemoglobin genotype AA were from upper and middle socioeconomic strata, respectively. Obesity does exist among children with sickle cell anemia in Lagos, Nigeria. Public health programs aimed at prevention and control of obesity must include children with sickle cell anemia.
    Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 05/2012; 29(4):358-64. · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Factors that have led to the increasing popularity of medical travel include the high cost of healthcare, long wait times for certain procedures, the ease and affordability of international travel, and improvements in both technology and standards of care in many countries. The present study aims to elaborate the factors that attract international cardiac patients to India, to document the proportion of the admissions into the paediatric cardiac ward who are international patients, and to identify the sources of funding of the international patients. This was a prospective, cross-sectional, and analytical study carried out between May 2009 and October 2009 in the paediatric cardiac care unit of a large tertiary care cardiac centre in India paediatric wards. Structured questionnaires were administered. A total of 1372 patients were admitted during the study period, of which 155 (11.3%) were patients from countries outside India. Majority of the patients were from Malaysia (45%), Nigeria (23%), and Tanzania (15%). The age ranged from 1 month to 39 years with an average of 61 months. The male to female ratio was 1:1.4 and the majority of subjects (72.5%) were in social classes 3 and 4. cheaper cost and better expertise was the prominent reason for choosing India. More than half of the respondents were either sponsored by the government or self-funded. For patients from Nigeria 53% (9) were sponsored by self (parent), 29% (5) by non-governmental organisations (NGO), 12% (2) by the parent employer, and 6% (1) by the government. There is a need for local development of facilities and training of personnel in specialised areas of healthcare to provide succour for a significant number of nationals who might otherwise have suffered and possibly have even died of their ailment. There is also the added advantage that such facilities would save foreign currency and help boost our economy.
    Indian heart journal 01/2012; 64(1):50-3.
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    ABSTRACT: Stunting adversely affects the physical and mental outcome of children. The objectives of the study were to determine the prevalence of and risk factors associated with stunting among urban school children and adolescents in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Five hundred and seventy children aged 5-19 years were selected using the multi-stage random-sampling technique. Stunting was defined as height-for-age z-score (HAZ) of < -2 standard deviation (SD) of the National Center for Health Statistics reference. Severe stunting was defined as HAZ of < -3 SD. The mean age of the children was 12.2 + 3.41 years, and 296 (51.5%) were males. Ninety-nine (17.4%) children were stunted. Of the stunted children, 20 (22.2%) were severely stunted. Identified risk factors associated with stunting were attendance of public schools (p < 0.001), polygamous family setting (p = 0.001), low maternal education (p = 0.001), and low social class (p = 0.034). Following multivariate analysis with logistic regression, low maternal education (odds ratio = 2.4; 95% confidence interval 1.20-4.9; p = 0.015) was the major contributory factor to stunting. Encouraging female education may improve healthcare-seeking behaviour and the use of health services and ultimately reduce stunting and its consequences.
    Journal of Health Population and Nutrition 08/2011; 29(4):364-70. · 1.12 Impact Factor
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    I O Senbanjo, K A Oshikoya, O F Njokanma
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    ABSTRACT: There is significant variability of the age at which children achieve dryness. We determine the age at achievement of micturational dryness and attitude of parents about enuresis among urban Nigerian children. A total of 346 questionnaires were administered to parents of children between the ages of 12 - 180 months who came for routine paediatric care at the outpatient unit of Federal Medical Centre, Abeokuta. At age 36 months, 86 (51.8 %) and 34 (20.5 %) out of 166 children had achieved dryness at daytime and night time respectively. Achievement of dryness was significantly related to low maternal education (p = 0.022) and low social class (p = 0.009). Twenty-four (26.7 %) children had nocturnal enuresis. Four (4.4 %) of these children also had diurnal enuresis. All the parents/guardians were aware about enuresis but only 9.8 % correctly identified it as a health problem. Even though none of the children with enuresis ever visited health facility for their problem, a statistically significant proportion of the parents desire to discuss with health practitioners (p = 0.015). The proportion of children achieving dryness by age 36 months is very small when compared with children from developed parts of the world. There is also a high prevalence of enuresis which are not reported. Therefore, health workers in the tropics should as a routine enquire about enuresis in their daily paediatric care particularly for those children from polygamous homes and high social class.
    African health sciences 06/2011; 11(2):244-51.
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    ABSTRACT: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) may cause prolonged hospital admissions with high treatment costs. The burden of ADRs in children has never been evaluated in Nigeria. The incidence of pediatric ADRs and the estimated cost of treatment over an 18-month period were determined in this study. Prospective observational study on children admitted to the pediatric wards of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH) in Nigeria, between July 2006 and December 2007. Each patient was assessed for ADRs throughout admission. Medical and non-medical costs to the hospital and patient were estimated for each ADR by reviewing the medical and pharmacy bills, medical charts and diagnostic request forms and by interviewing the parents. Cost estimates were performed in 2007 naira (Nigeria currency) from the perspectives of the hospital (government), service users (patients) and society (bearers of the total costs attributable to treating ADRs). The total estimated cost was expressed in 2007 United States dollars (USD). Two thousand and four children were admitted during the study; 12 (0.6%) were admitted because of ADRs and 23 (1.2%) developed ADR(s) during admission. Forty ADRs were suspected in these 35 patients and involved 53 medicines. Antibiotics (50%) were the most suspected medicines. Approximately 1.83 million naira (USD 15,466.60) was expended to manage all the patients admitted due to ADRs. Treating pediatric ADRs was very expensive. Pediatric drug use policies in Nigeria need to be reviewed so as to discourage self-medication, polypharmacy prescription and sales of prescription medicines without prescription.
    São Paulo medical journal = Revista paulista de medicina 05/2011; 129(3):153-64. · 0.75 Impact Factor
  • B A Animasahun, E N Ekure, O F Njokanma
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    ABSTRACT: A double-chambered right ventricle (DCRV) is a rare congenital heart disease and an uncommon cause of congestive cardiac failure. An anomalous muscle band divides the right ventricle into two cavities, causing variable degrees of obstruction. Echocardiography is considered a useful method for the diagnosis of this pathology, especially in children. An eight-year-old patient with a small ventricular septal defect (VSD) and double-chambered right ventricle presented with a history of palpitations, easy fatigability and recurrent fever. On presentation, she had features of congestive cardiac failure. A complete diagnosis was initially missed with transthoracic two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiography but later obtained based on transthoracic 2-D echocardiography with Doppler facility. This was confirmed with cardiac catheterisation. The patient was referred for surgical correction, which was successful. Due to the rarity of this condition and the consequences of missing the diagnosis, we present this case in order to highlight the rarity of this congenital heart disease in childhood.
    Cardiovascular journal of Africa 01/2011; 22(5):274-7. · 0.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Few studies documenting the echocardiographic findings of patients with sickle cell anaemia have been reported from Africa despite the high prevalence of the disease on the continent. The present study aimed to determine echocardiographic cardiac dimensions and haemodynamic parameters of children with homozygous sickle cell anaemia (SCA), in steady state at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH). Sixty children with SCA and sixty age and sex matched controls with ages ranging from 1-15 years were studied. Their cardiovascular functions were determined by echocardiographic examination. Mean age of SCA patients and controls were 95.41 ± 49.06 months and 95.45 ± 50.9 months respectively (p = 0.97). Mean left atrial dimension (LA), left ventricular end diastolic diameter (LVEDD), left ventricular end systolic diameter (LVESD), left ventricular posterior wall thickness (LVPW), Interventricular septal thickness (IVS) and left ventricular mass (LVM) in SCA patients were significantly larger than those of controls (p < 0.001 for each parameter). Left ventricular fractional shortening (FS) and ejection fraction (EF) were within acceptable normal limits although significantly lower in SCA patients (p < 0.001). The mean haemoglobin concentration in the subjects (77.23 ± 12.88) was significantly lower than in the controls (121 ± 16.09) (p < 0.001). Each direct echocardiographic parameter (LAD, AO, LVEDD, LVESD, IVS, LVPW and LVM) correlated significantly with age in both groups while left ventricular functional parameters (FS and EF) did not in both groups. Chamber dimensions, LVPW, FS and EF were inversely correlated with haemoglobin concentration in the subjects.
    The Nigerian postgraduate medical journal 06/2010; 17(2):107-12.
  • B A Animasahun, C O Akitoye, O F Njokanma
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    ABSTRACT: Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a chronic haemolytic disorder caused by homozygous inheritance of abnormal haemoglobin called 'haemoglobin S' (HbS). The disease burden is enormous to the patient, family and community. One potential weapon in its prevention is health information and awareness among the populace. The study is to detrmine the awareness of sickle cell anaemia among health professionals and medical students at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital Idiaraba, Lagos. Part of a large study which was cross-sectional and descriptive study, carried out at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), between the months of August and September 2006. Data were collected from 403 health professionals and students using structured questionnaires. Majority (98.7%) of the respondents had heard about SCA. Only 211 (55%) of the respondent felt genotype screening should be done at pre-school age. 128 (33.7%) felt it should be done during childhood. Doctors had a statistically significantly better knowledge of best time for detecting genotype. In all, 85% of the respondents had been involved in the management of sickle cell anaemia with the highest proportion among nurses (p = 0.02). Only 93 (24.3%) of the respondents knew most of the complications of sickle cell anaemia, 176 (46.3%) knew some of it, while 111 (29.2%) knew only a law complications. Nurses had a statistically significantly poorer knowledge of the complication of sickle cell anaemia. More nurses felt that engagement should be ended if there was a risk of having a child with sickle cell anaemia. Continuing medical education for health professionals about sickle cell anaemia, its management and complication is necessary.
    Nigerian quarterly journal of hospital medicine 01/2010; 19(4):195-9.

Publication Stats

91 Citations
20.40 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2014
    • Lagos University Teaching Hospital
      Eko, Lagos, Nigeria
  • 2011–2013
    • Lagos State University
      • Department of Paediatrics and Child Health
      Eko, Lagos, Nigeria
  • 2010–2013
    • College of Medicine University of Lagos
      Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria
  • 2012
    • Narayana Hrudayalaya Hospitals
      Bengalūru, Karnātaka, India