U Mazza

Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Piedmont, Italy

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Publications (116)403.82 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this study we have tested the distribution of Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) DNA sequences throughout the spectrum of lymphoid neoplasia in Italy and Spain. 180 cases of lymphoid malignancies representative of the major histologic and immunophenotypic categories of B- and T-cell tumours were analysed by means of a polymerase chain reaction-based assay. KSHV sequences were consistently absent in all categories of lymphoid malignancies studied, with the exception of a subset of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas localizing in the pleural, pericardial or peritoneal cavities, and fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of body-cavity-based lymphoma. The selective and consistent association of KSHV sequences with cases of body-cavity-based lymphoma throughout the spectrum of lymphoid neoplasms suggests that KSHV may be involved in the pathogenesis of this peculiar type of lymphoid malignancy.
    British Journal of Haematology 03/2008; 91(4):918 - 920. · 4.94 Impact Factor
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 12/2006; 445(1):170 - 176. · 4.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Juvenile hemochromatosis is a rare genetic disorder that causes iron overload. Clinical complications, which include liver cirrhosis, heart failure, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and diabetes, appear earlier and are more severe than in HFE-related hemochromatosis. This disorder, therefore, requires an aggressive therapeutic approach to achieve iron depletion. We report here the case of a young Italian female with juvenile hemochromatosis who was unable to tolerate frequent phlebotomy because of coexistent ss-thalassemia trait. The patient was successfully iron-depleted by combining phlebotomy with recombinant human erythropoietin.
    Haematologica 09/2000; 85(8):865-7. · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    Haematologica 02/2000; 85(1):109-10. · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hereditary hyperferritinemia-cataract syndrome (HHCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by bilateral cataracts and increased serum and tissue L-ferritin, in the absence of iron overload. The deregulation of ferritin production is caused by heterogeneous mutations in the iron regulatory element (IRE) of L-ferritin that interfere with the binding of iron regulatory proteins. We have identified several patients from three unrelated Italian families with HHCS. Iron parameters were assessed by standard methods. The IRE element of L-ferritin was amplified by PCR using appropriate primers and directly sequenced. Ferritin levels ranged from 918 microg/L to 2490 microg/L in the patients studied. In one family bilateral cataracts were diagnosed early in life, whereas in the others cataracts were diagnosed around 40-50 years. The female proband of family 3 presented with a severe iron deficiency anemia, which was unrecognized because of the increased ferritin values. Sequencing of the IRE element of L-ferritin in the probands of the three families identified three different nucleotide substitutions (+32 GAE A, +40 AAE G and +39 CT) in the IRE of L-ferritin. These mutations have already been reported in unrelated subjects of different ethnic origins. Our findings are consistent with recurrent mutations associated with HHCS and underline the importance of this syndrome in the differential diagnosis of unexplained hyperferritinemia. In addition, the findings highlight the role played by transferrin saturation in the diagnosis of iron deficiency in these patients.
    Haematologica 07/1999; 84(6):489-92. · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) are chronic myeloproliferative disorders that may progress to acute leukemia in a subset of patients. This study aimed at investigating the genetic lesions associated with the blastic transformation of PV and ET. A panel of PV and ET cases at different stages of disease was analyzed for the presence of genetic alterations of TP53, NRAS, KRAS, and MDM2 by a combination of mutational analysis and Southern blot hybridization. The occurrence of microsatellite instability (MSI) was also tested in selected cases. Samples of PV and ET analyzed in chronic phase disease were consistently devoid of all genetic lesions tested, suggesting that alterations of TP53, NRAS, KRAS, and MDM2 do not contribute significantly to development of chronic phase PV and ET. Conversely, mutations of TP53were detected in 7/15 (46.6%) blastic phase cases, including 3/5 PV and 4/10 ET. In blastic phase patients for whom the corresponding chronic phase DNA was also available, it could be documented that the genetic lesion had arisen at the time of blastic transformation. In addition to TP53 mutations, cases of blastic phase PV and ET occasionally harbored mutations of NRAS (one case of blastic phase ET) or displayed MSI (one case of blastic phase PV). These data indicate that inactivation of TP53 is a relatively frequent event associated with the blastic transformation of PV and ET and may be responsible for the tumor progression of these disorders. Genes Chromosom. Cancer 19:250–255, 1997. © 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 12/1998; 19(4):250 - 255. · 3.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty-seven lymphomas of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) derived from distinct anatomical sites were tested for the presence of genetic lesions commonly involved in B-cell lymphomagenesis, including activation of proto-oncogenes (BCL-1, BCL-2, BCL-6, and c-MYC), disruption of tumor suppressor loci (p53, 6q), and infection by viruses [Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Kaposi's sarcoma-herpesvirus/human herpesvirus-8 (KSHV/HHV-8)]. Sixteen low-grade and 11 high-grade MALT-lymphomas were included in the study. The presence of genetic lesions was tested by a combination of molecular approaches, including Southern blot hybridization, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism followed by DNA direct sequencing. Alterations of BCL-1, BCL-2, or c-MYC, as well as infection by KSHV/HHV-8, scored negative in all MALT-lymphomas analysed. Conversely, rearrangements of BCL-6 and mutations of p53 clustered with a fraction of high-grade MALT-lymphomas. Deletions of 6q occurred in selected cases of both low- and high-grade MALT-lymphomas, whereas a monoclonal infection by EBV was restricted to one single patient. These data corroborate the notion that the molecular pathogenesis of MALT-lymphomas differs substantially from that of nodal B-cell lymphomas. Occasionally, however, a proportion of high-grade MALT-lymphomas may harbor selected genetic lesions among the ones commonly involved in nodal B-cell lymphomagenesis. Am. J. Hematol. 56:206–213, 1997. © 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    American Journal of Hematology 12/1998; 56(4):206 - 213. · 4.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: B-diffuse large-cell lymphomas (DLCL) have been associated with some molecular lesions, but the role of such lesions as prognostic markers is still controversial. This report concerns an investigation of the frequency and clinical correlation of bcl-6, bcl-2, c-myc rearrangements and 6(q) deletions in B-DLCL. The presence of these genetic lesions was analyzed in samples of lymph nodes or bone marrow collected at diagnosis in 71 patients with B-DLCL, all treated with an anthracycline-containing chemotherapy regimen. Rearrangement of bcl-6 was found in 11 patients (15%), rearranged bcl-2 in 12 (17%), 6(q) deletions in 10 patients (14%) and c-myc rearrangement in four (6%). Patients with rearranged bcl-6 tended to have a more aggressive disease than patients with germ-line bcl-6 (intermediate-high/high risk according to IPI criteria: 73% vs. 43%), but there were no differences in three-year survival rates (62% vs. 42%) between the two groups. The numbers of involved extranodal sites were similar in patients with rearranged and those with germ-line bcl-6. Patients with bcl-2 rearrangement appeared to have a less aggressive disease than those with germ-line bcl-2 (low/ low-intermediate risk 75% vs. 47%) and a slightly better three-year survival rate (70% vs. 41%) but again the difference was not significant. Both groups with or without 6(q) deletion had similar clinical characteristics and outcomes. The four patients with c-myc rearrangement had aggressive disease and did poorly. The analysis of molecular lesions in B-DLCL may be useful for a better diagnostic definition; however, in this study we were unable to show that the evaluated genetic lesions had a significant impact on clinical outcome.
    Annals of Oncology 01/1998; 9(1):55-61. · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty-seven lymphomas of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) derived from distinct anatomical sites were tested for the presence of genetic lesions commonly involved in B-cell lymphomagenesis, including activation of proto-oncogenes (BCL-1, BCL-2, BCL-6, and c-MYC), disruption of tumor suppressor loci (p53, 6q), and infection by viruses [Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Kaposi's sarcoma-herpesvirus/human herpesvirus-8 (KSHV/HHV-8)]. Sixteen low-grade and 11 high-grade MALT-lymphomas were included in the study. The presence of genetic lesions was tested by a combination of molecular approaches, including Southern blot hybridization, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism followed by DNA direct sequencing. Alterations of BCL-1, BCL-2, or c-MYC, as well as infection by KSHV/HHV-8, scored negative in all MALT-lymphomas analysed. Conversely, rearrangements of BCL-6 and mutations of p53 clustered with a fraction of high-grade MALT-lymphomas. Deletions of 6q occurred in selected cases of both low- and high-grade MALT-lymphomas, whereas a monoclonal infection by EBV was restricted to one single patient. These data corroborate the notion that the molecular pathogenesis of MALT-lymphomas differs substantially from that of nodal B-cell lymphomas. Occasionally, however, a proportion of high-grade MALT-lymphomas may harbor selected genetic lesions among the ones commonly involved in nodal B-cell lymphomagenesis.
    American Journal of Hematology 01/1998; 56(4):206-13. · 4.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) are chronic myeloproliferative disorders that may progress to acute leukemia in a subset of patients. This study aimed at investigating the genetic lesions associated with the blastic transformation of PV and ET. A panel of PV and ET cases at different stages of disease was analyzed for the presence of genetic alterations of TP53, NRAS, KRAS, and MDM2 by a combination of mutational analysis and Southern blot hybridization. The occurrence of microsatellite instability (MSI) was also tasted in selected cases. Samples of PV and ET analyzed in chronic phase disease were consistently devoid of all genetic lesions tested, suggesting that alterations of TP53, NRAS, KRAS, and MDM2 do not contribute significantly to development of chronic phase PV and ET. Conversely, mutations of TP53 were detected in 7/15 (46.6%) blastic phase cases, including 3/5 PV and 4/10 ET. In blastic phase patients for whom the corresponding chronic phase DNA was also available, it could be documented that the genetic lesion had arisen at the time of blastic transformation. In addition to TP53 mutations, cases of blastic phase PV and ET occasionally harbored mutations of NRAS (one case of blastic phase ET) or displayed MSI (one case of blastic phase PV). These data indicate that inactivation of TP53 is a relatively frequent event associated with the blastic transformation of PV and ET and may be responsible for the tumor progression of these disorders.
    Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 09/1997; 19(4):250-5. · 3.55 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Hematology - AMER J HEMATOL. 01/1997; 56(4):206-213.
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    ABSTRACT: B-lineage diffuse large cell lymphoma (B-DLCL) arising de novo is characterized by a marked degree of clinical heterogeneity. To determine whether or not the clinical heterogeneity of de novo B-DLCL is reflected by heterogeneity in the molecular features of these tumors, we investigated the pattern of distribution of several genetic lesions in 70 cases of de novo B-DLCL at diagnosis. The panel of genetic lesions tested comprised the molecular alterations most frequently detected in B-DLCL, including rearrangements of BCL2, BCL6, and MYC as well as deletions of 6q and mutations of TP53. One or more genetic lesions were detected in 39/70 cases of B-DLCL. Isolated structural alterations of BCL2, BCL6, 6q or TPS3 were detected in 8/70, 10/70, 11/70, and 3/70 cases, respectively. No isolated MYC lesions were detected. Six cases carried different combinations of two genetic lesions, including lesions of BCL2 + BCL6 (1 case), BCL2 + MYC (1 case), BCL2 + 6q (2 cases), or BCL6 + 6q (2 cases). One case had accumulated three genetic lesions, namely a rearrangement of BCL2 and BCL6 and a mutation of TPS3. Overall, these data show that multiple distinct patterns of genetic lesions may associate with de novo B-DLCL, indicating that the molecular pathogenesis of this group of lymphomas is characterized by a high degree of molecular heterogeneity.
    Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 06/1996; 16(1):21-30. · 3.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Microsatellite instability (MSI) represents one specific pattern of genomic instability and is one of the genetic lesions most frequently detected in human neoplasia. Although MSI has been found to be associated with a wide variety of solid cancers, its involvement in lymphoid malignancies is virtually unexplored. In this study, we have investigated the presence of MSI in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders by comparing the pattern of nine microsatellite repeats (two tetranucleotides, two trinucleotides, and five dinucleotides) on autologous germline and tumor DNA of 23 patients, including 17 with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (B-CLL/SLL), four with hairy cell leukemia, one with lymphoplasmacytoid lymphoma, and one with T-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. All samples at diagnosis displayed a germline pattern of the microsatellites examined, thus suggesting that MSI is not involved in the pathogenesis of these lymphoproliferations. Also, no microsatellite alterations were observed in consecutive samples of B-CLL/SLL obtained from the same patient at various stages of the disease both before and after chemotherapy. Conversely, alterations in 3/9 microsatellite repeats were detected in one case of Richter's syndrome which had evolved from a pre-existent B-CLL/SLL phase. Overall, the low frequency of MSI among chronic lymphoproliferative disorders adds further weight to the common view that the mechanisms and patterns of genomic instability in lymphoid neoplasia differ markedly from those commonly observed in solid cancers.
    Annals of Hematology 03/1996; 72(2):67-71. · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute leukemias carrying MLL rearrangements are characterized by a high degree of clinical and immunologic heterogeneity, as demonstrated by variability in their immunophenotype, consistent with lymphoid or myeloid/monoblastic derivation, as well as their occurrence in distinct age groups from infancy to adulthood. Recently, it was shown that inactivation of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene occurs frequently in cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia carrying MLL rearrangements. In order to assess the extent of TP53 inactivation throughout the immunophenotypic and clinical spectrum of MLL+ acute leukemias, we tested for TP53 mutations 29 cases of MLL+ acute leukemias displaying lymphoid (13 cases) or myeloid/monoblastic (16 cases) features and belonging to different age groups. Mutations were detected in 6/16 myeloid/monoblastic cases and in 3/13 lymphoid cases. Among myeloid/monoblastic leukemias, the TP53 mutations occurred in 3/4 infants, but only in 3/16 cases in other age groups. Overall, our data suggest that (1) TP53 inactivation is a relatively common event in leukemias with MLL rearrangements irrespective of the leukemic phenotype and of the patients' age; (2) at least two genetic lesions (i.e., MLL rearrangement and TP53 mutation) have accumulated in the short time (few weeks after the birth or conception of the child) corresponding to the development of acute leukemias of infancy.
    Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 02/1996; 15(1):48-53. · 3.55 Impact Factor
  • Genes Chromosomes & Cancer - GENE CHROMOSOME CANCER. 01/1996; 15(1):48-53.
  • Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics - CANCER GENET CYTOGENET. 01/1996; 91(2):175-175.
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    ABSTRACT: In this study we have tested the distribution of Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) DNA sequences throughout the spectrum of lymphoid neoplasia in Italy and Spain. 180 cases of lymphoid malignancies representative of the major histologic and immunophenotypic categories of B- and T-cell tumours were analysed by means of a polymerase chain reaction-based assay. KSHV sequences were consistently absent in all categories of lymphoid malignancies studied, with the exception of a subset of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas localizing in the pleural, pericardial or peritoneal cavities, and fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of body-cavity-based lymphoma. The selective and consistent association of KSHV sequences with cases of body-cavity-based lymphoma throughout the spectrum of lymphoid neoplasms suggests that KSHV may be involved in the pathogenesis of this peculiar type of lymphoid malignancy.
    British Journal of Haematology 01/1996; 91(4):918-20. · 4.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chromosomal deletions of band 13q14 occur recurrently in BCR/ABL negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD), including myelosclerosis with myeloid metaplasia (MMM), polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), juvenile chronic myeloid leukemia (JCML), and the so-called BCR/ABL- chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The RBI tumor suppressor locus, mapping to 13q14, has long since been hypothesized as the important gene. In this report, we have determined the frequency of 13q14 deletions at the molecular level in a large panel of BCR/ABL- CMPD at different disease stages and performed a detailed genetic analysis of gross rearrangements/deletions and point mutations of the RBI gene in these disorders. Our data show that molecular deletions of 13q14 are detected in a relatively large fraction of BCR/ABL- CMPD (38%), that they appear to be more frequent in MMM than in other BCR/ABL- CMPD, and that they may be present at diagnosis or occur during blastic evolution of the neoplasia. The RBI gene displayed a germline configuration in all BCR/ABL- CMPD tested, suggesting that 13q14 deletions in these disorders affect a tumor suppressor locus distinct from RBI.
    Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 11/1995; 14(2):106-11. · 3.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In order to verify the genetic factors influencing the clinical expression of beta-thalassemia we have studied 292 Italian patients, 165 with thalassemia intermedia and 127 with thalassemia major. The beta-globin gene mutations were defined in all cases. The number of alpha-globin genes and the integrity of specific control regions of the beta-globin cluster--gamma promoters and beta-Locus Control Region (beta-LCR)--were studied in selected cases. Homozygosity for mild mutations (group I) accounts for 24% of the intermedia patients and it is not represented among major patients. Forty-four percent of intermedia patients had combinations of mild/severe (group II) mutations and 32% had homozygosity or double heterozygosity for severe mutations (group III). Seventy-six percent of patients with thalassemia major were classified in group III and 24% in group II. Deletion type-alpha3.7 thalassemia, assessed in a part of the cases, was found in 5% of thalassemia major and 19.5% of intermedia patients in groups II and III. Structural analysis of gamma promoters and beta-LCR HS2 and HS4 regions, carried out in order to look for alterations associated with Hb F increase, did not reveal new mutations. Only rare polymorphic changes were observed at the HS2 and HS4 level. The -158G gamma C T change was found with an increased incidence in intermedia patients in groups II and III. A subset of 10 beta-thalassemia heterozygotes with mild intermedia phenotype resulted from coinheritance of a triplicated alpha-locus. We have been unable to find a molecular basis for the benign clinical course in approximately 20% of patients with thalassemia intermedia. Other genetic or acquired factors must be hypothesized which ameliorate the clinical condition.
    American Journal of Hematology 03/1995; 48(2):82-7. · 4.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A high frequency of lymphoma in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals has been reported since the outbreak of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in 1982. AIDS-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (AIDS-NHL) is almost invariably derived from B cells and is classified as high- or intermediate-grade NHL, according to the working formulation. Two main histologic types are recognized, including small noncleaved cell lymphoma (SNCCL) and diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL). Pre-existing host factors putatively involved in lymphoma development include disrupted immunosurveillance, deregulated cytokine production, chronic antigen stimulation, and infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). These alterations are associated with the development of multiple oligoclonal expansions which correspond to the clinical phase known as persistent generalized lymphadenopathy (PGL). The appearance of a true AIDS-NHL is characterized by the presence of a monoclonal B-cell population displaying several genetic lesions, including monoclonal EBV infection, c-MYC and BCL-6 rearrangements, RAS mutations, p53 inactivation, and 6q deletions. These genetic lesions cluster into two distinct molecular pathways, which specifically associate with the different histologic subtypes of AIDS-NHL, i.e., AIDS-SNCCL and AIDS-DLCL. The presence of distinct genetic pathways for AIDS-SNCCL and AIDS-DLCL correlate with a number of clinical features which distinguish these two groups of tumors, including differences in the age of onset, CD4 counts at the time of presentation, time elapsed since HIV infection, and clinical outcome.
    Annals of Hematology 01/1995; 69(6):281-90. · 2.87 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

926 Citations
403.82 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1964–2000
    • Università degli Studi di Torino
      • • Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche e Biologiche
      • • Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche
      • • Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Molecolari e Scienze per la Salute
      Torino, Piedmont, Italy
  • 1976–1979
    • Istituto Medicina Sport Torino
      Torino, Piedmont, Italy