Yoshikazu Nishino

Xi'an Jiaotong University, Ch’ang-an, Shaanxi, China

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Publications (115)562.72 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Family history and nutritional status may affect the long-term prognosis of stomach cancer, but evidence is insufficient and inconsistent. To clarify the prognostic factors of stomach cancer, we conducted a prospective study of 1,033 Japanese patients with histologically confirmed stomach cancer who were admitted to a single hospital between 1997 and 2005. Family history of stomach cancer and pretreatment body mass index (BMI) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Clinical data were retrieved from a hospital-based cancer registry. All patients were completely followed up until December, 2008. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated according to family history in parents and siblings and BMI category. During a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 403 all-cause and 279 stomach cancer deaths were documented. Although no association with family history was observed in the patients overall, analysis according to age group found an increased risk of all-cause death associated with a history in first degree relatives (HR = 1.61, 95% CI: 0.93-2.78, p = 0.09) and with a parental history (HR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.06-3.26) among patients aged under 60 years at diagnosis. BMI was related to all-cause and stomach cancer death among patients aged 60 and over, showing a J-shaped pattern (HR of all-cause death = 2.28 for BMI<18.5; HR = 1.61 for 25≤ vs. ≥23.0 to <25.0 kg/m2). A family history of stomach cancer, especially parental history, may affect mortality among younger stomach cancer patients, whereas nutritional status may be a prognostic factor in older patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    International Journal of Cancer 05/2014; · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tobacco smoking is a major risk factor for many diseases. We sought to quantify the burden of tobacco-smoking-related deaths in Asia, in parts of which men's smoking prevalence is among the world's highest. We performed pooled analyses of data from 1,049,929 participants in 21 cohorts in Asia to quantify the risks of total and cause-specific mortality associated with tobacco smoking using adjusted hazard ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. We then estimated smoking-related deaths among adults aged ≥45 y in 2004 in Bangladesh, India, mainland China, Japan, Republic of Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan-accounting for ∼71% of Asia's total population. An approximately 1.44-fold (95% CI = 1.37-1.51) and 1.48-fold (1.38-1.58) elevated risk of death from any cause was found in male and female ever-smokers, respectively. In 2004, active tobacco smoking accounted for approximately 15.8% (95% CI = 14.3%-17.2%) and 3.3% (2.6%-4.0%) of deaths, respectively, in men and women aged ≥45 y in the seven countries/regions combined, with a total number of estimated deaths of ∼1,575,500 (95% CI = 1,398,000-1,744,700). Among men, approximately 11.4%, 30.5%, and 19.8% of deaths due to cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and respiratory diseases, respectively, were attributable to tobacco smoking. Corresponding proportions for East Asian women were 3.7%, 4.6%, and 1.7%, respectively. The strongest association with tobacco smoking was found for lung cancer: a 3- to 4-fold elevated risk, accounting for 60.5% and 16.7% of lung cancer deaths, respectively, in Asian men and East Asian women aged ≥45 y. Tobacco smoking is associated with a substantially elevated risk of mortality, accounting for approximately 2 million deaths in adults aged ≥45 y throughout Asia in 2004. It is likely that smoking-related deaths in Asia will continue to rise over the next few decades if no effective smoking control programs are implemented. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.
    PLoS Medicine 04/2014; 11(4):e1001631. · 15.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate dietary patterns in relation to colorectal cancer risk in Japanese. We prospectively assessed the association between dietary patterns among the Japanese and the risk of colorectal cancer. Dietary information was collected from 44,097 Japanese men and women aged 40-79 years without a history of cancer at the baseline in 1994. During 11 years of follow-up, we documented 854 cases of colorectal cancer, which included 554 cases of colon cancer and 323 cases of rectal cancer. Factor analysis (principal component analysis) based on a validated food frequency questionnaire identified three dietary patterns: (1) a Japanese dietary pattern, (2) an "animal food" dietary pattern, and (3) a high-dairy, high-fruit-and-vegetable, low-alcohol (DFA) dietary pattern. After adjustment for potential confounders, the DFA pattern was inversely associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (hazard ratio of the highest quartile vs the lowest, 0.76; 95 % confidence interval 0.60-0.97; p for trend = 0.02). When colon and rectal cancers were separated, the inverse association between the DFA pattern and cancer risk was observed for rectal cancer (p for trend = 0.003), but not for colon cancer (p for trend = 0.43). No apparent association was observed for either the Japanese dietary pattern or the "animal food" dietary pattern. The DFA dietary pattern was found to be inversely associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. This association was observed for rectal cancer, but not for colon cancer.
    Cancer Causes and Control 03/2014; · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An association of cigarette smoking with breast cancer risk has been hypothesized. However, results from previous studies have been inconsistent. This case-control study investigated the association of cigarette smoking with breast cancer risk in terms of estrogen-receptor/progesterone-receptor (ER/PgR) status. From among female patients aged 30 years and over admitted to a single hospital in Japan between 1997 and 2011, 1,263 breast cancer cases (672 ER+/PgR+, 158 ER+/PgR-, 22 ER-/PgR+, 308 ER-/PgR- and 103 missing) and 3,160 controls were selected. History of smoking (ever, never), some smoking-related measures, and passive smoking from husbands (ever, never) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Polytomous logistic regression and tests for heterogeneity across ER+/PgR + and ER-/PgR- were conducted. For any hormone receptor subtype, no significant association was observed between history of smoking (ever, never) and breast cancer risk. Analysis of smoking-related measures revealed that starting to smoke at an early age of ≤19 years was significantly associated with an increased risk of postmenopausal ER-/PgR- cancer (odds ratio = 7.01, 95% confidence interval: 2.07-23.73). Other measures of smoking such as the number of cigarettes per day, the duration of smoking, and start of smoking before the first birth were not associated with breast cancer risk for any receptor subtype. There was no association between passive smoking (ever, never) and breast cancer risk for any of the four subtypes. These results indicate that history of smoking and passive smoking from husbands may have no overall effect on breast cancer risk for any hormone receptor subtype. However, it is possible that women who start to smoke as teenagers may have a higher risk of developing postmenopausal ER-/PgR- cancer. Further studies are needed to clarify the association of smoking with breast cancer risk, especially the role of starting to smoke at an early age.
    SpringerPlus 01/2014; 3:65.
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    ABSTRACT: Objective This study examined the association of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) during adulthood with stroke and its subtypes using data from a large-scale prospective cohort study in Japan. Methods The study population included 36,021 never-smoking Japanese women who were enrolled between 1983 and 1985 and were followed-up for 15 years. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for stroke death associated with ETS exposure at home during adulthood. Results A total of 906 cases of stroke death were observed during 437,715 person-years of follow-up. Compared with never-smoking women without smoking family members, HRs for stroke mortality among never-smoking women living with smoking family members in all subjects, in those aged 40–79 years, and in those aged ≥ 80 years were 1.14 (95% confidence interval: 0.99–1.31), 1.24 (95% CI: 1.05–1.46), and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.66–1.19), respectively, after adjustment for possible confounders. The risk was most evident for subarachnoid hemorrhage [HR: 1.66 (95% CI: 1.02–2.70) in all subjects]. Conclusion This study suggests that exposure to ETS at home during adulthood is associated with an increased risk of stroke among never-smoking Japanese women.
    Preventive Medicine. 01/2014; 67:41–45.
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    ABSTRACT: Studies on the effects of consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds on the incidence of pancreatic cancer are not conclusive. We examined the association (if any) between the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds and the risk of pancreatic cancer in Japan. Data from 32,859 participants registered in the Ohsaki National Health Insurance Cohort Study who were 40–79 years old and free of cancer at baseline were analyzed. Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds was assessed at baseline using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire (containing 40 items). Incidences of pancreatic cancer were identified by computer linkage with the Miyagi Prefectural Cancer Registry. During 11 years of follow-up, 137 pancreatic cancers (67 men and 70 women) were identified. The hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of pancreatic cancer risk for the highest versus the lowest tertile were 0.82 (0.40–1.68, trend P = 0.57) in men and 0.64 (0.35–1.20, trend P = 0.22) in women for total consumption of fruits, 0.89 (0.46–1.73, trend P = 0.76) in men and 0.67 (0.33–1.35, trend P = 0.23) in women for total consumption of vegetables, and 0.92 (0.46–1.84, trend P = 0.81) in men for consumption of seaweeds (results for the consumption of seaweeds in women were not analyzed because of poor reliability), respectively. Total consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds was not associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer.
    Cancer Epidemiology. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In Japan, population-based cancer incidence data are reported several years behind the latest year of cancer mortality data. To bridge this gap, we aimed to determine a short-term projection method for cancer incidence. Data between 1985 and 2007 were obtained from the population-based cancer registries in four prefectures (Miyagi, Yamagata, Fukui and Nagasaki). Three projection models were examined: generalized linear model with age and period (A + P linear); generalized linear model with age, period and their interactions (A*P linear); and generalized additive model with age, period and their interactions smoothed by spline (A*P spline). We performed a 5-year projection for the years 2000 and 2005, based on the data of 1985-95 and 1985-2000, respectively. Seven cancer sites (stomach, liver, colorectal, lung, female breast, cervix uteri and prostate) and all cancers combined were analyzed. The accuracy of projection was evaluated by whether each observed number fell within the 95% confidence interval of the projected number. The A*P spline model accurately projected 8 of 13 cancer site-sex combinations, whereas the number of site-sex combinations of accurate projection was 2 and 6 for A + P linear and A*P linear models, respectively. For liver and colorectal cancers, the A*P spline model alone performed accurate projections; the relative differences between projected and observed numbers of cancer incidence ranged between -0.4 and +10.9% for the A*P spline, and between +7.4 and +37.6% for the other two models. All three models failed to project sudden increases in prostate cancer between 2000 and 2005. The A*P spline model is a candidate method for the projection of cancer incidence in Japan. However, we need a continuous validation for prostate cancer.
    Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology 11/2013; · 1.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although cigarette smoking is a well-known risk factor for lung cancer, histology-specific risk has not been fully clarified in Japan. This case-control study evaluated the associations between smoking and lung cancer risk according to sex and histologic type. From among patients aged 30 yrs and over admitted to a single hospital in Japan between 1997 and 2009, 1,670 lung cancer cases and 5,855 controls were selected. History of smoking, quantity and duration of smoking, and passive smoking from spouses were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each exposure were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. Ever-smoking was significantly associated with a higher risk of squamous cell and small cell carcinoma. The OR for these two histologic types combined was larger in women (OR = 24.98, 95% CI: 13.50-46.23) than in men (OR = 9.43, 95% CI: 5.73-15.51). Analysis of the quantity and duration of smoking showed that the OR for each exposure level tended to be larger in women than in men. For adenocarcinoma, clear positive associations with quantity and duration-related factors were observed among men, and a significant positive association with passive smoking from spouses was found among non-smoking women (OR = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.06-1.95). These results suggest sex- and histologic type- differences in the association of smoking with lung cancer risk. Although smoking control should be continued to prevent lung cancers, further studies are required to better clarify differences in smoking-related lung cancer risk between the sexes and histologic types. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Cancer Science 08/2013; 104(11):1515–1522. · 3.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background:Epidemiological evidence regarding the effect of coffee on the incidence of prostate cancer is inconsistent. We aimed to investigate coffee consumption and the risk of prostate cancer risk in a general Japanese population.Methods:We conducted a prospective cohort study in Ohsaki city, Japan, where 18 853 men aged 40-79 years participated in a baseline survey. Coffee consumption was assessed via a validated self-administered questionnaire. During 11 years of follow-up (from January 1 1995 to December 31, 2005), 318 incident cases of prostate cancer were detected. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence interval (CIs).Results:There was a significant inverse association between coffee consumption and the incidence risk of prostate cancer. Compared with those who did not drink coffee, the multivariate adjusted HRs were 0.81 (95% CI: 0.61-1.07), 0.73 (95% CI: 0.53-1.00), and 0.63 (095% CI: 0.39-1.00) for those who drank coffee occasionally, 1-2 cups per day, and 3 cups per day, respectively, with a P for trend of 0.02.Conclusion:This prospective finding from a Japanese population adds evidence that coffee intake is inversely associated with the incidence of prostate cancer.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication 14 May 2013; doi:10.1038/bjc.2013.238 www.bjcancer.com.
    British Journal of Cancer 05/2013; · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The associations between anthropometric factors, physical activity (PA), and breast cancer risk in terms of estrogen-receptor/progesterone-receptor (ER/PgR) status have been unclear in Japanese women. This case-control study was designed to evaluate these associations. METHODS: From among female patients aged 30 years and over admitted to a single hospital in Japan between 1997 and 2009, 1,017 breast cancer cases (538ER+/PgR+, 125ER+/PgR-, 23 ER-/PgR+, 249 ER-/PgR-, and 82 missing) and 2,902 controls were selected. Height, weight, body mass index (BMI) (kg/m(2)), and time spent exercising (hours/week) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Polytomous logistic regression analysis and tests for heterogeneity across ER+/PgR+ and ER-/PgR- were conducted. RESULTS: Higher BMI was associated with a higher risk of ER+/PgR+ cancer among women overall [odds ratio (OR) = 2.41, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.37-4.23 for BMI ≥30.0; P trend = 0.0001] and postmenopausal women (OR = 6.24, 95 % CI 2.68-14.53 for BMI ≥30.0; P trend < 0.0001). A longer time spent exercising (more than 5 h/week) showed a decreased risk for any type of breast cancer among overall and pre- and postmenopausal women, although this did not reach statistical significance. Height was not associated with any risk. CONCLUSIONS: Higher BMI is associated with an increased risk of ER+/PgR+ cancer among women overall and postmenopausal women. PA might be associated with a decreased risk of any type. To prevent breast cancer, weight control and PA are important.
    Cancer Causes and Control 03/2013; 24(5):1033-1044. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The analysis of cancer trends in Japan has only been sporadically reported. We present a comprehensive report on the trends in cancer incidence and mortality in Japan using the most recent population-based data. METHODS: National cancer mortality data between 1958 and 2011 were obtained from published vital statistics. Cancer incidence data between 1985 and 2007 were obtained from high-quality population-based cancer registries of four prefectures (Miyagi, Yamagata, Fukui and Nagasaki). Joinpoint regression analysis was performed to examine the trends in age-standardized rates of cancer incidence and mortality. RESULTS: All-cancer mortality decreased from the mid-1990s, with an annual percent change of -1.3% (95% confidence interval: -1.4, -1.3), while all-cancer incidence continually increased from 1985, with an annual percent change of 0.7% (95% confidence interval: 0.6, 0.8). Major cancer sites, particularly the liver, colorectum and lung (males), showed a pattern of increasing incidence and mortality rates until the mid-1990s, stabilizing or decreasing thereafter. Stomach cancer showed a long-term decreasing trend for both incidence and mortality, while female breast cancer showed a continuously increasing trend. The incidence of prostate cancer, particularly at the localized stage, increased rapidly between 2000 and 2003, while that of mortality decreased from 2004. No changes were detected in the incidence or mortality for colorectal, female breast or cervical cancers after the establishment of national screening programs for these cancers. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis of cancer trends in Japan revealed a recent decrease in mortality and a continuous increase in incidence, which are considered to reflect changes in the underlying risk factors such as tobacco smoking and infection, and are partially explained by early detection and improved treatment.
    Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology 03/2013; · 1.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although breastfeeding is associated with a reduction in the risk for breast cancer, its relationship with another hormone-related female cancer, endometrial cancer, has not been fully investigated. The objective of the present study was to prospectively examine the association between lactation pattern and the risk for incidence of breast cancer and endometrial cancer in Japanese women. We analyzed data for 26 680 women registered in the Ohsaki National Health Insurance Cohort Study, who were 40-79 years old at the baseline. During the 11 years of follow-up, we identified 148 incident cases of breast cancer and 32 incident cases of endometrial cancer. Compared with breastfeeding only, multivariate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the risk of breast cancer incidence were 1.12 (0.92-1.37) for women who had performed mixed feeding and 1.80 (1.14-2.86) for those who fed their babies only with formula (P-trend=0.014). For endometrial cancer incidence, multivariate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were 1.32 (0.86-2.03) for women who had performed mixed feeding and 3.26 (1.23-8.61) for those who had performed only formula feeding (P-trend=0.018). Our findings appear to raise the possibility that nonbreastfeeding is positively associated with the risks for both breast cancer incidence and endometrial cancer incidence. Confirmation of our findings would require further investigation.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 03/2013; 22(2):187-92. · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the association between body mass index and mortality from overall cardiovascular disease and specific subtypes of cardiovascular disease in east and south Asians. Pooled analyses of 20 prospective cohorts in Asia, including data from 835 082 east Asians and 289 815 south Asians. Cohorts were identified through a systematic search of the literature in early 2008, followed by a survey that was sent to each cohort to assess data availability. General populations in east Asia (China, Taiwan, Singapore, Japan, and Korea) and south Asia (India and Bangladesh). 1 124 897 men and women (mean age 53.4 years at baseline). Risk of death from overall cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, stroke, and (in east Asians only) stroke subtypes. 49 184 cardiovascular deaths (40 791 in east Asians and 8393 in south Asians) were identified during a mean follow-up of 9.7 years. East Asians with a body mass index of 25 or above had a raised risk of death from overall cardiovascular disease, compared with the reference range of body mass index (values 22.5-24.9; hazard ratio 1.09 (95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.15), 1.27 (1.20 to 1.35), 1.59 (1.43 to 1.76), 1.74 (1.47 to 2.06), and 1.97 (1.44 to 2.71) for body mass index ranges 25.0-27.4, 27.5-29.9, 30.0-32.4, 32.5-34.9, and 35.0-50.0, respectively). This association was similar for risk of death from coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke; for haemorrhagic stroke, the risk of death was higher at body mass index values of 27.5 and above. Elevated risk of death from cardiovascular disease was also observed at lower categories of body mass index (hazard ratio 1.19 (95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.39) and 2.16 (1.37 to 3.40) for body mass index ranges 15.0-17.4 and <15.0, respectively), compared with the reference range. In south Asians, the association between body mass index and mortality from cardiovascular disease was less pronounced than that in east Asians. South Asians had an increased risk of death observed for coronary heart disease only in individuals with a body mass index greater than 35 (hazard ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.15 to 3.12). Body mass index shows a U shaped association with death from overall cardiovascular disease among east Asians: increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease is observed at lower and higher ranges of body mass index. A high body mass index is a risk factor for mortality from overall cardiovascular disease and for specific diseases, including coronary heart disease, ischaemic stroke, and haemorrhagic stroke in east Asians. Higher body mass index is a weak risk factor for mortality from cardiovascular disease in south Asians.
    BMJ (online) 01/2013; 347:f5446. · 17.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of screening mammography (MMG) has mainly been demonstrated by studies in western countries. This study was conducted to evaluate cumulative survival and the risk of breast cancer death among Japanese women aged 40-69 years with screening-detected and interval breast cancer divided into three groups: MMG with clinical breast examination (CBE), CBE alone, and self-detection. METHODS: By matching a list of 126,537 women (358,242 person-screenings) who participated in the Miyagi Cancer Society Screening program between 1 April 1995 and 31 December 2002 with the Miyagi Prefectural Cancer Registry, 429 MMG with CBE, 522 CBE, and 3,047 self-detected cases were included in this study. Follow-up was performed until the date of death or 31 December 2007. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for breast cancer death. RESULTS: Five-year survival for women in the MMG with CBE, CBE, and self-detection groups was 96.8, 92.7, and 86.6 %, respectively. The HR (95 % CI) for breast cancer death was 2.38 (0.72-7.94) among CBE-screened and 4.44 (1.42-13.89) among self-detected cases for women aged 40-49 years, but was 3.00 (1.63-5.50) among CBE-screened and 4.51 (2.69-7.56) among self-detected cases for women aged 50-69 years relative to cases screened by use of MMG with CBE. CONCLUSIONS: In terms of the survival and risk of breast cancer death, MMG with CBE may be more effective than MMG alone or self-detection for Japanese women aged 40-69 years.
    Breast Cancer 12/2012; · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Computer-aided detection (CAD) increases breast cancer detection, but its cost-effectiveness is unknown for breast cancer screening in Japan. We aimed to determine whether screening mammography diagnosed by one physician using CAD is cost-effective when compared with the standard double reading by two physicians. METHODS: We established our model with a decision tree and Markov model concept based on feasible screening and clinical pathways, combined with prognosis of the health state transition of breast cancer. Cost-effectiveness analysis between double reading by two readers and single reading with CAD by one reader was performed from a social perspective in terms of the expected cost, life expectancy and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). The hypothetical population comprised 50-year-old female breast cancer screening examinees. Only direct medical costs related to breast cancer screening and treatment were considered. One simulation cycle was 2 years, and the annual discount rate was 3 %. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the robustness of the model and input data. RESULTS: Single reading with CAD increased expected costs by 2,704 yen and extended life expectancy by 0.0087 years compared with double reading. The ICER was 310,805 yen per life year gained, which is below the threshold. Sensitivity analysis showed that the sensitivity and specificity of CAD and the number of breast cancer screening examinees greatly affected the results. CONCLUSIONS: Single reading using CAD in mammography screening is more cost-effective than double reading, although the results are highly sensitive to the sensitivity and specificity of CAD and the numbers of examinees.
    Breast Cancer 10/2012; · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We aimed to examine the association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in a pooled analysis of data from the Asia Cohort Consortium. The data for this pooled analysis included 883 529 men and women from 16 cohort studies in Asian countries. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pancreas cancer mortality in relation to BMI. Seven predefined BMI categories (<18.5, 18.5-19.9, 20.0-22.4, 22.5-24.9, 25.0-27.4, 27.5-29.9, ≥30) were used in the analysis, with BMI of 22.5-24.9 serving as the reference group. The multivariable analyses were adjusted for known risk factors, including age, smoking, and a history of diabetes. We found no statistically significant overall association between each BMI category and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in all Asians, and obesity was unrelated to the risk of mortality in both East Asians and South Asians. Age, smoking, and a history of diabetes did not modify the association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer. In planned subgroup analyses among East Asians, an increased risk of death from pancreas cancer among those with a BMI less than 18.5 was observed for individuals with a history of diabetes; hazard ratio=2.01 (95% confidence interval: 1.01-4.00) (P for interaction=0.07). The data do not support an association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in these Asian populations.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 10/2012; · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tubeimoside-1 (TBMS1) has been shown to possess promising anticancer potential against various cancer cells. However, its effect against melanoma cells remained enigmatic. In this study, for the first time, we investigated the effect of TBMS1 on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in melanoma A375 cells. In order to examine the effects of TBMS1 on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, we performed MTT assays and flow cytometry analysis. The results revealed that TBMS1 decreased the cell viability of melanoma A375 cells. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that TBMS1 markedly induced apoptosis of A375 cells and arrested cell cycle at G2/M phase in a dosedependent manner. Induction of apoptosis involved a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, down-regulation of Bcl-2 and upregulation of Bax before culminating in apoptosis in TBMS1-treated A375 cells. These in vitro results suggested that TBMS1 should be further examined for in vivo activity and molecular mechanism in human melanoma.
    Bangladesh Journal of Pharmacology 08/2012; 7:150-156. · 0.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The associations between menstrual and reproductive factors and breast cancer risk in relation to estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PgR) status have been unclear in Japanese women. This case-control study evaluated these associations, overall and separately, by menopausal status. A total of 1092 breast cancer cases and 3160 controls were selected from among female patients aged 30 years and over admitted to a single hospital in Miyagi Prefecture between 1997 and 2009. The receptor status distribution among the cases (missing: 8.4%) was 571 ER+/PgR+, 133 ER+/PgR-, 24 ER-/PgR+ and 271 ER-/PgR-. Menstrual and reproductive factors were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Polytomous logistic regression and tests for heterogeneity across ER+/PgR+ and ER-/PgR- were conducted. Later age at menarche was significantly associated with a decreased risk of both ER+/PgR+ and ER-/PgR- cancer among women overall (P(trend) = 0.0016 for ER+/PgR+; P(trend) = 0.015 for ER-/PgR-) and among postmenopausal women (P(trend) = 0.012 for ER+/PgR+; P(trend) = 0.0056 for ER-/PgR-). Nulliparity was associated with an increased risk of ER+/PgR+, but not ER-/PgR- cancer among women overall (P(heterogeneity) = 0.019) and among postmenopausal women (odds ratio for ER+/PgR+ = 2.56, 95% confidence interval = 1.61-4.07; P(heterogeneity) = 0.0095). A longer duration of breastfeeding tended to be associated with a decreased risk in all subtypes among women overall. Later age at menarche has a protective effect against both ER+/PgR+ and ER-/PgR- cancer. However, parity might impact differently on various subtypes of breast cancer. Further studies are needed to clarify the etiology of the rare ER+/PgR- and ER-/PgR+ cancer subtypes.
    Cancer Science 07/2012; 103(10):1861-70. · 3.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Body mass index (BMI) may be an important factor affecting breast cancer outcome. Studies conducted mainly in Western countries have reported a relationship between higher BMI and a higher risk of all-cause death or breast cancer-specific death among women with breast cancer, but only a few studies have been reported in Japan so far. In the present prospective study, we investigated the associations between BMI and the risk of all-cause and breast cancer-specific death among breast cancer patients overall and by menopausal status and hormone receptor status. The study included 653 breast cancer patients admitted to a single hospital in Japan, between 1997 and 2005. BMI was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. The patients were completely followed up until December, 2008. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated according to quartile points of BMI categories, respectively: <21.2, ≥21.2 to <23.3 (reference), ≥23.3 to <25.8 and ≥25.8 kg/m2. During the follow-up period, 136 all-cause and 108 breast cancer-specific deaths were observed. After adjustment for clinical and confounding factors, higher BMI was associated with an increased risk of all-cause death (HR = 2.61; 95% CI: 1.01-6.78 for BMI ≥25.8 vs. ≥21.2 to <23.3 kg/m2) among premenopausal patients. According to hormonal receptor status, BMI ≥25.8 kg/m2 was associated with breast cancer-specific death (HR = 4.95; 95% CI: 1.05-23.35) and BMI <21.2 kg/m2 was associated with all-cause (HR = 2.91; 95% CI: 1.09-7.77) and breast cancer-specific death (HR = 7.23; 95% CI: 1.57-33.34) among patients with ER + or PgR + tumors. Analysis by hormonal receptor status also showed a positive association between BMI and mortality risk among patients with ER + or PgR + tumors and with BMI ≥21.2 kg/m2 (p for trend: 0.020 and 0.031 for all-cause and breast cancer-specific death, respectively). Our results suggest that both higher BMI and lower BMI are associated with an increased risk of mortality, especially among premenopausal patients or among patients with hormonal receptor positive tumors. Breast cancer patients should be informed of the potential importance of maintaining an appropriate body weight after they have been diagnosed.
    BMC Cancer 04/2012; 12:149. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although experimental studies have shown that gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) has a role in tumor progression, epidemiologic evidence for a relationship between GGT and cancer incidence is limited. The present study investigated the association between GGT and cancer incidence and assessed the role of alcohol consumption in this association. We examined a cohort of 15 031 Japanese adults aged 40 to 79 years who attended a health checkup in 1995 and were free of cancer at that time. GGT was measured using the Szasz method. The participants were then followed from 1 January 1996 until 31 December 2005, and cancer incidence was recorded by using the Miyagi Regional Cancer Registry. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed for each quartile of GGT and compared. The lowest quartile (GGT <13.0 IU/ml) was used as the reference category. We documented 1505 cancers. Among participants in the highest quartile (GGT ≥31.0 IU/ml), the multivariate HR for any cancer was 1.28 (95% CI, 1.08-1.53; P for trend, <0.001), the HR for colorectal cancer was significantly greater than unity, and the HRs for esophageal, pancreatic, and breast cancers were greater than unity but not significantly so. This positive trend was observed only in current drinkers. Our findings suggest that there is a positive relationship between GGT and cancer incidence only for alcohol-related cancers in current drinkers and that the positive association of GGT with cancer incidence largely reflects alcohol consumption.
    Journal of Epidemiology 03/2012; 22(2):144-50. · 2.11 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
562.72 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Xi'an Jiaotong University
      Ch’ang-an, Shaanxi, China
  • 2006–2013
    • Miyagi Cancer Center
      Сендай, Miyagi, Japan
    • Iwate Prefectural Central Hospital
      Aomori, Aomori Prefecture, Japan
  • 1999–2012
    • Tohoku University
      • • Division of Public Health and Forensic Medicine
      • • Graduate School of Medicine
      Sendai, Kagoshima-ken, Japan
  • 2011
    • Moncrief Cancer Institute
      Fort Worth, Texas, United States
    • Vanderbilt University
      • Division of Epidemiology
      Nashville, MI, United States
  • 2004–2009
    • University Hospital Medical Information Network
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2003–2006
    • Fujita Health University
      • Department of Public Health
      Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
    • Nagoya University
      Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
  • 2005
    • Aichi Cancer Center
      Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan
    • Miyagi University
      Japan
    • National Cancer Research Institute
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 1997
    • The University of Tokyo
      • Department of Health Science and Nursing
      Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan