Yingqian Cai

Southern Medical University, Shengcheng, Guangdong, China

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Publications (18)37.89 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: T cells have major functions in the initiation and perpetuation of nerve graft rejection. Our study aimed to investigate the function of regulatory T cells (Treg)-Th1-Th17-Th22 cells in the rejection of peripheral nerve xenotransplantation.
    Transplantation 08/2014; · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) are considered a novel and promising source of stem cells for cell replacement-based therapy. Current research is mostly limited to investigating the cellular differentiation potential of AMSCs, while few have focused on their immunosuppressive properties. This study is aimed at exploring and evaluating the immunosuppressive effect of human AMSCs on the viability and migratory properties of microglia. We found, from results of cell viability assays, that AMSCs can reduce the activity of inflammatory cells by secreting nitric oxide (NO). Also, based on results from wound healing and transwell migration assays, we show that AMSCs can inhibit the migration of human microglia as well as the mouse microglial cell line BV2, suggesting that they have the ability to inhibit the recruitment of certain immune cells to injury sites. Furthermore, we found that NO contributes significantly to this inhibitory effect. Our study provides evidence that human AMSCs can have detrimental effects on the viability and migration of microglia, through secretion of NO. This mechanism may contribute to anti-inflammatory processes in the central nervous system.
    Brain research. 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that up-regulation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and subsequent peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) formation exerts a devastating effect on the damage of BBB in multiple diseases. However, considerably less attention has been focused on the role of NOS/ONOO(-) in BBB disruption after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Using an experimental stroke model by injecting hemoglobin (Hb) into the caudate nucleus of male Sprague Dawley rats, we explored the role of NOS/ONOO(-) in BBB disruption after ICH. Brain edema content, behavioral changes, alterations of TJ proteins (claudin-5 and ZO-1), expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS), formation of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), as well as NO production were investigated. Hb in the rat brain leaded to a significant brain edema production and neurological deficits. Overexpressed NOS were concomitant with large quantities of 3-NT formation. Moreover, sites of enhanced nNOS, iNOS, eNOS and 3-NT immunoreactivity were colocalized with diminished or discontinuous ZO-1 and/or claudin-5 staining as evidenced by westerblot and immunofluorescence, indicating the involvement of NOS and ONOO(-) in the BBB disruption. Meaningfully, levels of 3-NT in serum which had a similar tendency with that of in brain tissues (r=0.934, P<0.001), had a marked correlation with brain edema content (r=0.782, P<0.001) and neurological deficits (r=0.851, P<0.001). We concluded that ONOO(-) formation by the upregulation of NOS may play a central role in promoting the BBB damage following ICH. Moreover, ONOO(-) may be a promising biomarker for the judgement or prediction of brain injury and clinical prognosis after ICH.
    Brain research 05/2014; · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive form of human brain tumor. It was previously shown that high levels of laminin-8 expression were a predictor of tumor recurrence and patient survival. It is thus important to elucidate the mechanism by which laminin-8 expression is regulated and determine how this contributes to glioma progression. This study investigated the mechanism of regulation of LAMB1, which encodes the β1 chain of laminin-8, in glioma cells lines and in a mouse model of GBM.Methods The expression levels of LAMB1 and miR-124-5p were examined in glioma cell lines (U87 and U251) and GBM tissue samples by quantitative PCR and Western blotting. The potential regulation of LAMB1 by miR-124-5p was investigated by assessing the effects of restored miR-124-5p expression on cell proliferation, colony formation, and tumor growth and angiogenesis. The effects of inhibiting LAMB1 on tumor growth and angiogenesis were also assessed.ResultsThe upregulation of LAMB1 expression was highly correlated with the downregulation of miR-124-5p. LAMB1 protein expression was suppressed by miR-124-5p. The restoration of miR-124-5p expression suppressed glioma growth by inhibiting angiogenesis, effects that were also observed upon LAMB1 knockdown.Conclusions The findings indicate that miR-124-5p functions as a tumor suppressor and could serve as a molecular marker for glioma diagnosis and as a potential therapeutic target in GBM treatment.
    Neuro-Oncology 02/2014; · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have confirmed the therapeutic effects of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transplantation on cerebral ischemia. However, the proliferative, differentiative, and homing capacity of BMSC from the elderly are significantly reduced, especially after several passages expansion in vitro. In this study, by introducing lentivirus-mediated hTERT and VEGF genes to modify human BMSCs from aged donors, we observed extended lifespan, promoted angiogenic capacity while less enhanced tumorigenicity of the genetically engineering BMSCs. These results therefore suggest that the modification of aged BMSCs by dual expression of hTERT and VEGF may be used for autologous cell replacement for ischemic cerebrovascular disease in elderly patients.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 09/2013; · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many studies have shown that microglia in the activated state may be neurotoxic. It has been proven that uncontrolled or over-activated microglia play an important role in many neurodegenerative disorders. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been shown in many animal models to have a therapeutic effect on neural damage. Such a therapeutic effect is attributed to the fact that BMSCs have the ability to differentiate into neurons and to produce trophic factors, but there is little information available in the literature concerning whether BMSCs play a therapeutic role by affecting microglial activity. In this study, we triggered an inflammatory response situation in vitro by stimulating microglia with the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and then culturing these microglia with BMSC-conditioned medium (BMSC-CM). We found that BMSC-CM significantly inhibited proliferation and secretion of pro-inflammatory factors by activated microglia. Furthermore, we found that the phagocytic capacity of microglia was also inhibited by BMSC-CM. Finally, we investigated whether the induction of apoptosis and the production of nitric oxide (NO) were involved in the inhibition of microglial activation. We found that BMSC-CM significantly induced apoptosis of microglia, while no apoptosis was apparent in the LPS-stimulated microglia. Our study also provides evidence that NO participates in the inhibitory effect of BMSCs. Our experimental results provide evidence that BMSCs have the ability to maintain the resting phenotype of microglia or to control microglial activation through their production of several factors, indicating that BMSCs could be a promising therapeutic tool for treatment of diseases associated with microglial activation.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(12):e84116. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the effect of CatWalk automated gait analysis system for evaluation of motor function of rats with traumatic brain injury (TBI) after umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cell (UC-MSC) treatment. Eighteen Wistar rats were randomized equally into normal control group, TBI ∓ saline group, and TBI ∓ UC-MSCs group. The rats in the latter two groups were subjected to weight-drop impact to induce TBI followed by injection UC-MSCs or saline into the lesion 7 days after TBI. The neurological function was assessed using CatWalk system and modified neurological severity scores (mNSS) before and 3 days after TBI and 7 days after UC-MSC transplantation. The rats were sacrificed 14 days after the cell transplantation and the brain sections were stained for immunohistochemical analyses. Three days after TBI, mNSS test showed moderate injury of the rats. Seven days after the cell transplantation, the rats showed significant motor function improvement and CatWalk analysis indicated partial recovery of the gait parameters of the 4 limbs compared to the rats with saline treatment. Histological analyses showed that DiO-labeled UC-MSCs were present in the lesion boundary and expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein and β-tubulin III. UC-MSC transplantation can promote functional improvement of the brain after TBI in rats. Compared with mNSS test, CatWalk analysis is more sensitive and objective for assessing neurological function and also provides more detailed information on specific gait parameters.
    Nan fang yi ke da xue xue bao = Journal of Southern Medical University 04/2012; 32(4):449-55.
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    ABSTRACT: Both vasculogenic mimicry (VM) and transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) are positively correlated with malignancy in glioma. Accordingly, we supposed that TGFβ might be related with VM, and aimed to detect whether TGFβ could influence VM formation in two glioma cell lines U251MG and SHG44, which were different in malignancy. We found that the VM-positive U251MG had a significantly higher TGFβ expression than the VM-negative SHG44. Downregulating TGFβ in U251MG by RNAi technology resulted in a significantly impaired VM formation, which could be rescued by rhTGFβ. However, adding rhTGFβ could not induce VM in SHG44. To investigate the possible mechanism, we detected the changes of some VM-related genes including EphA2, VE-cadherin, MMP-2, MMP-9, MT1-MMP and LAMC2 by RT-PCR and found that MT1-MMP transcript was affected by TGFβ expression. Gelatin zymography showed a declined MMP-2 activity in the TGFβ-inhibited cells. Further studies showed that MT1-MMP inhibition impaired VM formation in U251MG. Moreover, TGFβ induced MT1-MMP expression and VM formation in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicated us that TGFβ was required for VM formation in U251MG. MT1-MMP was correlated with TGFβ-induced VM formation. Thus, TGFβ might be a potential target for VM inhibition in glioma.
    Cancer biology & therapy 12/2011; 12(11):978-88. · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to examine the nanoscale distribution and density of the VEGFR-2 membrane receptor on the endothelial cell surface of glioma microvasculature. Immunofluorescence and atomic force microscopy combined with immunogold labeling techniques were used to characterize and determine the position of the glioma microvasculature endothelial cell surface receptor VEGFR-2. We aimed to indirectly detect the distribution of VEGFR-2 on the cell membrane at the nanoscale level and to analyze VEGFR-2 quantitatively. Immunofluorescence imaging showed a large amount of VEGFR-2 scattered across the endothelial cell surface; atomic force microscopy imaging also showed two globular structures of different sizes scattered across the endothelial cell surface. The difference between the average diameter of the small globular structure outside the cell surface (43.67 ± 5.02 nm) and that of IgG (44.61 ± 3.19 nm) was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The three-dimensional morphologies of the small globular structure outside the cell surface and IgG were similar. The difference between the average diameter of the large globular structure outside the cell surface (74.19 ± 9.10 nm) and that of IgG-SpA-CG (74.54 ± 15.93 nm) was also not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The three-dimensional morphologies of this large globular structure outside the cell surface and IgG-SpA-CG were similar. The total density of these two globular structures within the unit area was 92 ± 19 particles μm(2). No globular structures were seen on the cell surface in the control group. The large globular structure on the surface of glioma microvascular endothelial cells was categorized as a VEGFR-2-IgG-SpA-CG immune complex, whereas the small globular structure was categorized as a VEGFR-2-IgG immune complex. The positions of the globular structures were the same as the positions of the VEGFR-2 molecules. A large amount of VEGFR-2 was scattered across glioma microvascular endothelial cell surfaces; the receptor density was about 92 per square micron.
    Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology 07/2011; 31(5):687-94. · 2.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article reports the phototoxicity effects of a novel photosensitiser ZnPcS4-BSA on human U251 glioma cells in vitro. The cellular uptake of ZnPcS4-BSA by U251 glioma cells was quantified by UV-spectra, and the optimal incubation time was determined. Human U251 glioma cells were incubated in ZnPcS4-BSA of various concentrations, and received laser irradiation of different energy densities. Cell survival rates were measured by CCK-8 assay. Flow cytometer was used to detect apoptosis. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene was detected by real-time PCR in U251 cells after photodynamic therapy (PDT), and β-actin was used as an internal standard. The normal U251 cells severed as controls. Results indicate that the uptake of ZnPcS4-BSA by U251 glioma cells reaches maximum after incubation for 4 hours. ZnPcS4-BSA with different concentrations without light irradiation has no significant effects on cell survival rates. Without ZnPcS4-BSA incubation, cell survival rate of high-dose group (400 J/cm(2)) is the lowest, whereas no significant difference has been found between any other two groups. At laser irradiation of 150 J/cm(2), inhibition rates of the cells increase with ZnPcS4-BSA concentration, and half-inhibitory concentration (IC50) is 0.16 μmol/L. Apoptosis rate of the cells after PDT is significantly higher than that of the control group (p < 0.01). The VEGF expression in the cells increases 5.616 times after PDT. The novel ZnPcS4-BSA is a good photosensitiser for PDT towards U251 glioma cells. The ZnPcS4-BSA based PDT can induce effective apoptosis.
    British Journal of Neurosurgery 12/2010; 24(6):660-5. · 0.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors consisting of 18 alpha and 8 beta subunits. Heterodimer composition of alpha and beta subunits has a potential for determining tumor subtypes of human lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression profile of integrins in lung cancer cells. Expression profiling of integrins in a panel of lung cancer cell line, including A549 (adenocarcinoma, ADC), Calu-1 (squamous carcinoma, SCC), H1650 (bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, BAC) and DMS-53 (small cell lung cancer, SCLC), was analyzed by cDNA microarrays, restriction analysis of gene expression (RAGE) and flow cytometry. Seventy-nine lung cancer specimens were used to further validate the data from cell lines using immunohistochemistry. Integrins are obviously expressed in a cell type-specific manner, such as alpha 3 in A549, Calu-1 and H1650 except in DMS53, alpha 4 in H1650, alpha 5 and beta1 in all cell lines. The integrins detected with cDNA microarrays were all unequivocally detected with RAGE and by flow cytometry at the protein level. In all lung cancer specimens, alpha 3 integrin was strongly expressed in ADC, SCC and BAC, but was infrequent in SCLC. alpha 4 integrin was solely expressed in BAC. alpha 5 and beta1 integrins were expressed in all four histological types of lung cancer specimens. Integrin alpha 3 and alpha 4 may be useful as diagnostic markers for adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. RAGE is a promising technique for studying the expression profiles of genes, such as integrins in cancer cells.
    Pathology - Research and Practice 09/2009; 205(12):847-53. · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It has been well accredited that the neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from bone marrow stroma cells (BMSCs) can be used as the therapeutic application. However, their efficacy and safety in therapeutic application are uncertain. In this experiment, the trace marking and oncogenicity of NSCs derived from BMSCs (BMSCs-D-NSCs) were studied. The BMSCs were harvested by gradient centrifugation and cultured in "NSCs medium" in vitro. The verified CD133/Nestin-positive BMSCs-D-NSCs were then transplanted into nude mice to detect the oncogenicity, into the right lateral cerebral ventricle or right caudae putamen and substantia nigra to examine, whether the symptoms were improved in Parkinson's Disease (PD) models after transplantation, by both SPECT image assay of dopamine transporter (DAT) in corpus striatum and its average standard uptake value (SUVave) in corpus striatum and thalamus. Tissue samples and surviving model animals were studied at 1, 3, and 6 months post-transplantation. Before transplantation, the cells were labeled with BrdU or rAAV-GFP for the pathological sections, and with Feridex for the in vivo trace by MRI assay. The concanavalin A (ConA) agglutination test, stop-dependence test with soft agar, karyotype analysis of chromosome G zone in BMSCs-D-NSCs, and the nude mouse neoplasia test were also performed. The BrdU, rAAV-GFP or Feridex can be used as trace markers of BMSCs-D-NSCs during transplantation. The transplanted BMSCs-D-NSCs displayed neither toxicity nor neoplasia up to 6 months in vivo, but could play an important role in improving the symptoms of the animals with degenerative diseases like PD.
    Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology 09/2008; 28(5):689-711. · 2.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The transversal differentiation of bone marrow stroma cell (BMSCs) into neural stem cells (NSCs) has attracted much attention in recent years because of their therapeutic potential. However, the problem in therapeutic application of NSCs was how to confirm whether neuron-like cells differentiated from bone marrow stroma cell-derived neural stem cells (BMSCs-D-NSCs) possess corresponding functions of neurochemistry and electrophysiology. In the present study, we tried to affirm the function of neuron-like cells differentiated from BMSCs-D-NSCs in vitro. The BMSCs were harvested by gradient centrifugation in Ficoll-Paque and cultured in "NSCs medium". Immunocytochemistry was used to detect positive expression of neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) in neuron-like cells derived from the BMSCs-D-NSCs. High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to identify neuron-like cells by detecting excitable amino acids [aspartic acid (Asp), glutamic acid (Glu)], inhibited amino acids [glycine (Gly), gamma (gamma) -aminobutyric acid (GABA), alanine (Ala)] or monoamines [noradrenaline (NE), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), dopamine (DA)]. Electrophysiological properties of the neuron-like cells were also examined using patch clamp analysis to verify their neuron-like functions. It was found that the neuron-like cells differentiated from the BMSCs-D-NSCs could express positive NeuN, synthesize and excrete amino acids, and show some typical electrophysiological properties including the typical Na+ and K+ ion channel membrane current under the voltage patch clamp condition, the typical static electrical membrane potential under the current patch clamp condition, and the differential membrane capacitance and resistance values in series between undifferentiated BMSCs-D-NSCs and differentiated neuron-like cells under the whole-cell patch clamp condition. The neuron-like cells differentiated from BMSCs-D-NSCs exhibit both neuron-like biochemical function and some corresponding electrophysiological properties.
    Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology 07/2008; 28(4):545-58. · 2.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate how the characteristic structure of the cytoskeleton in glioma cells is associated with invasiveness. The whole cytoskeletal system was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), while single cytoskeletal elements were exhibited by AFM and using cytoskeletal protein inhibitors to inhibit microfilaments or/and microtubules and displayed by immunofluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence intensity of F-actin was measured by flow cytometry and the structural difference between C6 glioma cells and astrocytes was studied. Cytoskeletons in both cells presented network structures, however, the C6 glioma cells showed an irregular edge root and their microfilaments were creber and dense. Intermediate filaments were extensive network structure with non-polarized multipoint connections. The microtubules were relatively big and long and formed tight bundles with close connections between bundles. Astrocytes had a regular and smooth edge, with sparse microfilaments, while the intermediate filaments were dense and interwoven and the microtubules were dense bundled, but only loosely connected each other. Besides, the fluorescence intensity of F-actin was significantly higher in C6 glioma cells (202.54 +/- 11.06) than in the astrocytes (62.64 +/- 10.23), P < 0.01. Whole cytoskeleton and its elements of C6 cells were disclosed of characteristic structures associated with invasiveness. Meanwhile, the content of F-actin could be used as a parameter for measuring cell invasiveness.
    Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology 04/2008; 28(6):895-905. · 2.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies suggest that bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are promising grafts for treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Neural precursor cells (NPCs) have been detected in the site of cervical cord injury following intrathecal injection by lumbar puncture. So, this study is designed to determine whether BMSCs (after intrathecal administration by lumbar puncture) could also migrate to the TBI site. The cells were cultured in vitro and transfected with adenovirus green fluorescent protein (Ad-GFP), and then transplanted intrathecally or intravenously into an autologous rabbit model of TBI. The labeled, grafted cells were identified in the injured cerebral tissue using fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that the intrathecal protocol was more efficient than the intravenous one. And motor dysfunction was improved after autologous transplantation of BMSCs. This study suggests another attractive minimally invasive option for treating TBI.
    Neuroscience Letters 04/2008; 434(2):160-4. · 2.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human adult bone marrow-derived neural stemlike cells (MDNSCs) may serve as ideal seed cells for cell replacement therapy for human neurological disorders and injuries. However, the long-term safety of this cell population after transplantation must be thoroughly explored before clinical application, and tumorigenicity is a major concern. In this study, we generated MDNSCs capable of forming neurospherelike aggregates and with the potency to differentiate into neural lineage cells in vitro and investigated hundreds of cancer-related genes in MDNSCs in order to determine whether there were any characteristics that could help in the evaluation of their tumorigenic potential. According to the results of testing by PCR and DNA sequencing, there were no mutations at the frequent mutation sites of tumor-suppressor genes p53, p16, and Rb1. Of the 440 cancer-related genes covered by Oligo GEArray Human Cancer Microarray OHS-802, 63 were found to be significantly overexpressed compared with that in fresh normal human adult bone marrow depleted of red blood cells (RBCs). In particular, the overexpressed genes included those promoting cell proliferation and cell invasion and metastasis and members of several oncogenic signaling pathways. The overexpression of MYC, MMP2, Notch2, STC1, ITGA3, STAT5b, RhoC, and Wnt1 was also revealed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Because it has been shown that activation of some of these genes promote tumorigenesis, our findings highlight the need for further studies of long-term tumorigenicity in MDNSCs.
    Journal of Neuroscience Research 12/2007; 85(14):3064-70. · 2.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this experiment, the bone marrow stroma cells (BMSCs) were harvested and then cultured in "neural stem cells (NSCs) medium" which was modulated by our lab with P. R. of China patent number as ZL 02134314.4 in vitro. The proliferation of NSCs was confirmed by formation of cell's clones and scan electron microscopy test. The identifications of NSCs, neurons-like cells and glial-like cells were immunocytochemically performed by detecting Nestin, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Neurons-like cells were further identified by detecting excitability amino acid, inhibited amino acid, or monoamine biological activity materials with high pressure liquid chromatograph (HPLC), and also by examining the electrophysiological properties with patch clamp, in order to verify their neuron-like functions. It was implied that the differentiated BMSCs-NSCs-derived neuron-like cells were characterized by both the neuron-like bio-chemical function and some corresponding electrophysiological properties.
    Conference proceedings: ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference 02/2005; 5:5215-8.
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    ABSTRACT: ObjectiveTo investigate the effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) on U251 human glioma cells in vitro. MethodsU251 human glioma cells were routinely cultured and then treated with ALA, a type of photosensitizer, at various concentrations followed by light irradiation. The PDT-induced phototoxicity of the cells was determined by a MTT assay. In addition, cells were treated with ALA at a fixed concentration and subjected to various doses of light irradiation. ResultsWith the same light dosage (25.0 J/cm2), the cell survival rates were 70.16%±5.02%, 50.19%±4.79%, 34.97%±5.34%, 27.04%±4.34%, and 24.26% ±2.76% at ALA concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mM, respectively (F =279.88, P =0.0000). But the survival rates of the cells incubated with 2.0 mM ALA compared to those with 4.0 mM ALA (27.04%±4.34% vs 24.26%±2.76%) showed no significant difference (P=0.611 ). At a single ALA concentration, the cell survival rates were 83.48% ± 6.79%, 68.09%±6.02%, 33.75%± 6.70%, 23.34%± 5.08% and 15.14%± 3.60% for light doses of 6.25,12.5, 25.0,50.0, and 100 J/cm2, respectively (F=422.03, P=0.0000). Without exposure to light, however, the cell survival rates were 96.64% ±6.56%, 97.71% ±5.48%, 98.10% ±6.25%, 99.44% ±7.02%, and 95.86% ±7.80% for ALA concentrations at 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mM, respectively (F=0.68,P =0.6085). Without ALA in the medium, the cell survival rates were 98.74% ±6.20%, 96.49% ±7.13%, 97.60% ±5.94%, 95.70%±4.86%, 98.08%±6.26% for light doses of 6.25, 12.5, 25.0, 50.0, and 100 J/cm2, respectively (F=0.6400, P=0.6368). ConclusionThe PDT damage to the U251 cells increased with ALA concentration within a relative lower range, but then plateaued at higher concentrations. PDT damage was proportional to the doses of irradiated light. Without ALA, the light alone caused no photodynamic damage and ALA itself was nontoxic. The ALA-induced PDT appears to be a promising therapy for glioma.
    Chinese Journal of Clinical Oncology 07/2004; 1(4):256-261.

Publication Stats

61 Citations
37.89 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2014
    • Southern Medical University
      • Department of Neurosurgery
      Shengcheng, Guangdong, China
  • 2011
    • Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences and General Hospital
      Shengcheng, Guangdong, China