Hsin D Chen

University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States

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Publications (8)28.04 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This protocol is a modified version of DNA isolation using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and 96-well plates. It is high-throughput, which facilitates the analysis of large mapping populations. The DNA yield is adequate for at least 100-500 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures.
    Cold Spring Harbor Protocols 11/2010; 2010(11):pdb.prot5516. · 4.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Advances in next-generation sequencing technology have facilitated the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Sequenom-based SNP-typing assays were developed for 1359 maize SNPs identified via comparative next-generation transcriptomic sequencing. Approximately 75% of these SNPs were successfully converted into genetic markers that can be scored reliably and used to generate a SNP-based genetic map by genotyping recombinant inbred lines from the intermated B73 × Mo17 population. The quantitative nature of Sequenom-based SNP assays led to the development of a time- and cost-efficient strategy to genetically map mutants via quantitative bulked segregant analysis. This strategy was used to rapidly map the loci associated with several dozen recessive mutants. Because a mutant can be mapped using as few as eight multiplexed sets of SNP assays on a bulk of as few as 20 mutant F2 individuals, this strategy is expected to be widely adopted for mapping in many species.
    Genetics 08/2010; 184(1):19-26. · 4.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Advances in next-generation sequencing technology have facilitated the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Sequenom-based SNP-typing assays were developed for 1359 maize SNPs identified via comparative next-generation transcriptomic sequencing. Approximately 75% of these SNPs were successfully converted into genetic markers that can be scored reliably and used to generate a SNP-based genetic map by genotyping recombinant inbred lines from the intermated B73 x Mo17 population. The quantitative nature of Sequenom-based SNP assays led to the development of a time- and cost-efficient strategy to genetically map mutants via quantitative bulked segregant analysis. This strategy was used to rapidly map the loci associated with several dozen recessive mutants. Because a mutant can be mapped using as few as eight multiplexed sets of SNP assays on a bulk of as few as 20 mutant F(2) individuals, this strategy is expected to be widely adopted for mapping in many species.
    Genetics 11/2009; 184(1):19-26. · 4.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A massively parallel pyro-sequencing technology commercialized by 454 Life Sciences Corporation was used to sequence the transcriptomes of shoot apical meristems isolated from two inbred lines of maize using laser capture microdissection (LCM). A computational pipeline that uses the POLYBAYES polymorphism detection system was adapted for 454 ESTs and used to detect SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) between the two inbred lines. Putative SNPs were computationally identified using 260,000 and 280,000 454 ESTs from the B73 and Mo17 inbred lines, respectively. Over 36,000 putative SNPs were detected within 9980 unique B73 genomic anchor sequences (MAGIs). Stringent post-processing reduced this number to > 7000 putative SNPs. Over 85% (94/110) of a sample of these putative SNPs were successfully validated by Sanger sequencing. Based on this validation rate, this pilot experiment conservatively identified > 4900 valid SNPs within > 2400 maize genes. These results demonstrate that 454-based transcriptome sequencing is an excellent method for the high-throughput acquisition of gene-associated SNPs.
    The Plant Journal 09/2007; 51(5):910-8. · 6.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes the use of temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis (TGCE) to test for polymorphisms between two DNA fragments. Polymorphisms may be detected within an individual or between individuals depending on the experimental design. In this assay, alleles of interest and a "reference" allele are PCR-amplified with high-fidelity Taq polymerase, and the resulting amplicons are then mixed in a 1:1 ratio. This mixture is denatured and reannealed to allow formation of homoduplexes (in the absence of polymorphisms between the allele of interest and the reference allele) and heteroduplexes (in the presence of polymorphisms). The Reveal System (SpectruMedix), which can analyze four 96-well plates at a time, is then used for electrophoresis and detection, and the data are scored and viewed with Revelation software.
    CSH protocols. 01/2007; 2007:pdb.prot4845.
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    ABSTRACT: A new genetic map of maize, ISU-IBM Map4, that integrates 2029 existing markers with 1329 new indel polymorphism (IDP) markers has been developed using intermated recombinant inbred lines (IRILs) from the intermated B73xMo17 (IBM) population. The website http://magi.plantgenomics.iastate.edu provides access to IDP primer sequences, sequences from which IDP primers were designed, optimized marker-specific PCR conditions, and polymorphism data for all IDP markers. This new gene-based genetic map will facilitate a wide variety of genetic and genomic research projects, including map-based genome sequencing and gene cloning. The mosaic structures of the genomes of 91 IRILs, an important resource for identifying and mapping QTL and eQTL, were defined. Analyses of segregation data associated with markers genotyped in three B73/Mo17-derived mapping populations (F2, Syn5, and IBM) demonstrate that allele frequencies were significantly altered during the development of the IBM IRILs. The observations that two segregation distortion regions overlap with maize flowering-time QTL suggest that the altered allele frequencies were a consequence of inadvertent selection. Detection of two-locus gamete disequilibrium provides another means to extract functional genomic data from well-characterized plant RILs.
    Genetics 12/2006; 174(3):1671-83. · 4.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis (TGCE) can be used to distinguish heteroduplex from homoduplex DNA molecules and can thus be applied to the detection of various types of DNA polymorphisms. Unlike most single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection technologies, TGCE can be used even in the absence of prior knowledge of the sequences of the underlying polymorphisms. TGCE is both sensitive and reliable in detecting SNPs, small InDel (insertion/deletion) polymorphisms (IDPs) and simple sequence repeats, and using this technique it is possible to detect a single SNP in amplicons of over 800 bp and 1-bp IDPs in amplicons of approximately 500 bp. Genotyping data obtained via TGCE are consistent with data obtained via gel-based detection technologies. For genetic mapping experiments, TGCE has a number of advantages over alternative heteroduplex-detection technologies such as celery endonuclease (CELI) and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC). Multiplexing can increase TGCE's throughput to 12 markers on 94 recombinant inbreds per day. Given its ability to efficiently and reliably detect a variety of subtle DNA polymorphisms that occur at high frequency in genes, TGCE shows great promise for discovering polymorphisms and conducting genetic mapping and genotyping experiments.
    Theoretical and Applied Genetics 08/2005; 111(2):218-25. · 3.66 Impact Factor
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Publication Stats

295 Citations
28.04 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009
    • University of Florida
      Gainesville, Florida, United States
  • 2007
    • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
  • 2005–2007
    • Iowa State University
      • Department of Agronomy
      Ames, IA, United States