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Publications (3)6.88 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To develop and validate the Alcohol Relapse Risk Scale (ARRS) for Japanese alcohol-dependent individuals and to compare the features of relapse risk for alcohol-dependent individuals with those for stimulant abusers. The ARRS is a multidimensional self-rating scale consisting of 32 items based on the Stimulant Relapse Risk Scale (SRRS). Two hundred eighteen inpatients and outpatients with a history of alcohol dependence (181 males and 36 females) were recruited, provided informed consent, and were administered the ARRS. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for alcohol craving, current state of drinking, and data on relapse within 1 month after the rating were used for validation. Exploratory factor analysis highlighted five factors: stimulus-induced vulnerability (SV), emotionality problems (EP), compulsivity for alcohol (CA), lack of negative expectancy for alcohol (NE), and positive expectancy for alcohol (PE). Cronbach's alpha coefficient for each of the subscales ranged from .55 to .90 and was .90 for the total ARRS, indicating their adequate internal consistency. SV, EP, CA, PE, and total ARRS were significantly correlated with the VAS and current drinking state, supporting their concurrent validity. SV and total ARRS were significantly correlated with relapse, suggesting that the ARRS is useful for predicting relapse risk in alcohol-dependent individuals, similar to the SRRS for stimulant abusers. Compared with stimulant abusers, alcohol-dependent individuals tended to express their desires related to relapse more honestly on the scales. The ARRS has multidimensional psychometric properties that are useful for assessing the various aspects of alcohol relapse risk.
    Drug and alcohol dependence 04/2009; 101(1-2):20-6. · 3.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To develop and validate a multidimensional measure of relapse risk for stimulants in Japanese drug abusers. A Stimulant Relapse Risk Scale (SRRS) was developed based on the Marijuana Craving Questionnaire and a discussion among three psychiatrists. We created 48 items after confirming the items including a variety of relapse risk, such as craving (expectancy, compulsivity, etc.) and emotionality problems. One hundred inpatients and outpatients with a history of stimulant abuse (71 males and 29 females) were recruited with informed consent, and were administered the SRRS. The Visual Analogue Scale for drug craving (VAS), Addiction Severity Index for Japanese (ASI-J), and data on relapse within 3 and 6 months after the rating were used for the validation. Exploratory factor analysis highlighted five factors: anxiety and intention to use drug (AI), emotionality problems (EP), compulsivity for drug use (CD), positive expectancies and lack of control over drug (PL), and lack of negative expectancy for drug use (NE). These accounted for 48.3% of the total variance. Thirty of the 43 items were classified into the five subscales. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for each subscale ranged from .55 to .82, and was .86 for the total SRRS, indicating their adequate internal consistency. AI, CD, PL, and total SRRS were significantly correlated with the drug-use composite score of the ASI-J, supporting their concurrent validity. AI, PL, NE, and total SRRS were significantly correlated with relapse, implying their predictive validity. The SRRS has multidimensional psychometric properties useful for assessing the various aspects of stimulant relapse risk.
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence 06/2007; 88(2-3):174-81. · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) is a frequently used clinical and research instrument that collects data from substance abusers in seven problem areas: medical, employment, alcohol, drug use, legal, family-social functioning, and psychiatric status. In each area, the ASI provides a composite score and severity rating that estimate the seriousness of the problem and the client's need for treatment. In the present study, we investigated the reliability and validity of the Japanese version of the ASI (ASI-J). One hundred and eleven subjects with a history of drug abuse were interviewed with a test battery including the ASI with informed consent. This revealed that: (a) the problem areas were independent of each other, underscoring the need for multidimensional assessment, (b) the inter-rater correlation of severity ratings in each area ranged from 0.68 to 0.99, and Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the items used for the composite score in each area ranged from 0.57 to 0.86, indicating their reliability with the exception of the drug and employment areas, and (c) several composite scores were significantly correlated with the drug craving levels assessed by a visual analogue scale, the abstinence period, mental health, and/or relapse, supporting their concurrent and predictive validity. These results suggest that the ASI-J has acceptable reliability and validity.
    Nihon Arukōru Yakubutsu Igakkai zasshi = Japanese journal of alcohol studies & drug dependence 09/2006; 41(4):368-79.