Rolando Medina

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX, United States

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Publications (14)71.74 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aims of this study were to estimate the frequency and course of substances use disorders in Latino patients with schizophrenia and to ascertain risk factors associated with substance use disorders in this population. We studied 518 subjects with schizophrenia recruited for a genetic study from the Southwest United States, Mexico, and Central America (Costa Rica and Guatemala). Subjects were assessed using structured interviews and a best estimate consensus process. Logistic regression, chi(2), t test, Fisher's exact test, and Yates' correction, as appropriate, were performed to assess the sociodemographic variables associated with dual diagnosis. We defined substance use disorder as either alcohol or substance abuse or dependence. Out of 518 patients with schizophrenia, 121 (23.4%) had substance use disorders. Comorbid substance use disorders were associated with male gender, residence in the United States, immigration of Mexican men to the United States, history of depressive syndrome or episode, and being unemployed. The most frequent substance use disorder was alcohol abuse/dependence, followed by marijuana abuse/dependence, and solvent abuse/dependence. This study provides data suggesting that depressive episode or syndrome, unemployment, male gender, and immigration of Mexican men to the United States were factors associated with substance use disorder comorbidity in schizophrenia. Binary logistic regression showed that country of residence was associated with substance use disorder in schizophrenic patients. The percentage of subjects with comorbid substance use disorders was higher in the Latinos living in the United States compared with subjects living in Central America and Mexico.
    Schizophrenia Research 03/2010; 120(1-3):87-94. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chromosome 18 abnormalities are associated with a range of physical abnormalities such as short stature and hearing impairments. Psychiatric manifestations have also been observed. This study focuses on the presentations of psychiatric syndromes as they relate to specific chromosomal abnormalities of chromosome 18. Twenty-five subjects (13 with an 18q deletion, 9 with 18p tetrasomy, and 3 with an 18p deletion), were interviewed by psychiatrists (blind to specific chromosomal abnormality) using the DIGS (subjects 18 and older) or KSADS-PL (subjects under 18). A consensus best estimation diagnostic process was employed to determine psychiatric syndromes. Oligonucleotide Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (Agilent Technologies) was utilized to define specific regions of chromosome 18 that were deleted or duplicated. These data were further analyzed to determine critical regions of the chromosome as they relate to phenotypic manifestations in these subjects. 58.3% of the chromosome 18q- deletion subjects had depressive symptoms, 58.3% had anxiety symptoms, 25% had manic symptoms, and 25% had psychotic symptoms. 66.6% of the chromosome 18p- deletion subjects had anxiety symptoms, and none had depressive, manic, or psychotic symptoms. Fifty percent of the chromosome 18p tetrasomy subjects had anxiety symptoms, 12.5% had psychotic symptoms, and 12.5% had a mood disorder. All three chromosomal disorders were associated with high anxiety rates. Psychotic, manic and depressive disorders were seen mostly in 18q- subjects and this may be helpful in narrowing regions for candidate genes for these psychiatric conditions.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Neuropsychiatric Genetics 11/2009; 153B(3):837-45. · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We determined the rates of agreement between diagnoses, using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS) and diagnoses arrived at, using additional sources of information, to establish whether there are differences in agreement between direct interview diagnoses at US and non-US sites in comparison best estimate consensus process and to identify diagnoses that could increase diagnostic error when only the DIGS is used. DIGS diagnoses were compared with consensus diagnoses that used the same DIGS interview, plus Family Interview for Genetic Studies (FIGS) and review of medical records in 342 psychotic subjects. We found similar numbers of subjects diagnosed with schizophrenia (225 by direct interview, and 232 by consensus process). The majority of those "misdiagnosed" by direct interview had mood disorder by the consensus. Over 10% of the total subjects diagnosed by direct interview as not meeting criteria for schizophrenia had schizophrenia by consensus. There were no statistically significant differences between countries (US vs. non-US sites) in the agreement rate between direct interview diagnosis and consensus diagnosis. In conclusion, a final best-estimate process is essential to make diagnostic distinctions and to reduce diagnostic misclassifications for both research studies and in clinical practice.
    The Journal of nervous and mental disease 08/2009; 197(7):530-5. · 1.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Schizophrenia is a genetically complex illness with heterogeneous clinical presentation, including variable age of onset. In this study, the heritability, or proportion of variation in age of onset of psychotic symptoms due to genetic factors, was estimated using a maximum likelihood method. The subjects were 717 members of families with more than one member affected with schizophrenia from Mexican and Central American populations. Age of onset of psychosis was determined by best-estimate consensus diagnosis based on the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies, Family Interview for Genetic Studies, and each subject's medical records. Mean age of onset was 21.44 years (SD 8.07); 20.55 years for males (SD 6.90), and 22.67 for females (SD 9.34). Variance components were estimated using a polygenic model in the SOLAR software package. The sex of the participant was a significant covariate (P = 0.010) accounting for 0.02 of the total variance in age of onset. The heritability of age of onset of psychosis was 0.33 (SE = 0.09; P = 0.00004). These findings suggest that genetic factors significantly contribute to the age of onset of psychotic symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia and that sex influences this trait as well.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Neuropsychiatric Genetics 05/2009; 153B(1):298-302. · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study investigated a new set of families of Latin American ancestry in order to detect the location of genes predisposing to schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. A genome-wide scan was performed for 175 newly recruited families with at least two siblings suffering from a psychotic disorder. Best-estimate consensus procedures were used to arrive at diagnoses, and nonparametric allele-sharing statistics were calculated to detect linkage. Genome-wide significant evidence for linkage for the phenotype of DSM-IV schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder was found in a region on chromosome 17q21 (lod score, 3.33). A region on chromosome 15q22-23 showed suggestive evidence of linkage with this same phenotype (lod score, 2.11). Analyses using a broader model (any psychosis) yielded evidence of suggestive linkage for the 17q21 region only, and no region achieved genome-wide significance of linkage. The new set of 175 families of Mexican and Central American ancestry delineates two new loci likely to harbor predisposition genes for schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. The region with the strongest support for linkage in this sample, 17q21, has been implicated in meta-analyses of schizophrenia genome screens, but the authors found no previous reports of it as a locus for schizophrenia in specific population- or family-based studies, and it may represent the location of a schizophrenia predisposition gene (or genes) of special relevance in Mexican and Central American populations.
    American Journal of Psychiatry 03/2009; 166(4):442-9. · 14.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Variation in the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) promoter region has been shown to influence depression in persons who have been exposed to a number of stressful life events. We evaluated whether genetic variation in 5-HTTLPR, influences current depression, lifetime history of depression and quantitative measures of depression in persons with chronic psychotic disorders. This is an association study of a genetic variant with quantitative and categorical definitions of depression conducted in the southwest US, Mexico and Costa Rica. We analyzed 260 subjects with a history of psychosis, from a sample of 129 families. We found that persons carrying at least one short allele had a statistically significant increased lifetime risk for depressive syndromes (P < 0.02, odds ratio 2.18, 95% CI 1.10-4.20). The 'ss' or 'sl' genotype at the 5-HTTLPR promoter polymorphic locus increases the risk of psychotic individuals to develop major depression during the course of their illness.
    Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 11/2008; 119(2):117-27. · 4.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study attempted to replicate evidence for association of the Epsin 4 gene (which encodes enthoprotin, a protein involved in vesicular transport) to schizophrenia in a new sample of families segregating schizophrenia drawn from the Latin American population. 1,423 subjects (767 with a history of psychosis) from 337 Latino families were genotyped using three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the Epsin 4 gene. A family based association test was utilized to test for association of these SNPs to the phenotypes of psychosis and schizophrenia. Haplotypes defined by these three SNPs showed significant association to the phenotype of psychosis in this sample (global p value=0.014, bi-allelic p value=0.047). Variation in the Epsin 4 gene is significantly associated with psychotic disorder in this Latino population. This provides additional support for the involvement of enthoprotin in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders.
    Schizophrenia Research 11/2008; 106(2-3):253-7. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Functional alterations of components of the endogenous cannabinoid system, in particular of the cannabinoid receptor 1 protein (CB1), are hypothetical contributors to many of the symptoms seen in schizophrenia. Variants within the cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) have been shown to be directly associated with the hebephrenic form of schizophrenia in a Japanese population. This finding, however, has yet to be replicated. In the present study we sought to study the same (AAT)n-repeat microsatellite of the CNR1 gene which showed association to hebephrenic schizophrenia in Japan, and to investigate whether this microsatellite showed association to a hebephrenic type of schizophrenia in a family-based association study in a population of the Central Valley of Costa Rica. The Lifetime Dimensions of Psychosis Scale and a best estimate consensus process were utilized to identify subjects with schizophrenia who had an elevated lifetime dimensional score for negative and disorganized symptoms, which we used as a proxy for "hebephrenia." Using the Family Based Association Test we found association of these hebephrenic subjects and the (AAT)n-repeat marker of the CNR1 (multi-allelic P = 0.0368). Our hypothesis that an association with the (AAT)n-repeat marker of CNR1 would not be found with the more general type of schizophrenia was also confirmed. Schizophrenic subjects with prominent lifetime scores for disorganization and negative symptoms (dimension for hebephrenia) are associated with the CNR1 gene and present a type of symptomatology that resembles chronic cannabinoid-induced psychosis. The current finding points to the possibility of different genetic and pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying different types of schizophrenia.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Neuropsychiatric Genetics 05/2008; 147(3):279-84. · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Schizophrenia (SC) and bipolar disorder (BP) share many clinical features, among them psychosis. We previously identified a putative gene locus for psychosis on chromosome 18p in a sample from the Central Valley of Costa Rica (CVCR) population. The present study replicated the association to a specific allele of microsatellite marker D18S63 on 18p11.3, using a newly collected sample from the CVCR. A combined analysis of both samples, plus additional subjects, showed that this specific allele on D18S63, which lies within an intron on the TGFB-induced factor (TGIF) gene, is strongly associated (P-value=0.0005) with psychosis. Eleven additional SNP markers, spanning five genes in the region, were analyzed in the combined sample from the CVCR. Only the four SNPs within the TGIF gene were in strong linkage disequilibrium with D18S63 (D'=1.00). A specific haplotype for all five markers within the TGIF gene showed evidence of association (P-value=0.011) to psychosis. A second, distinct haplotype, containing a newly identified nonsynonymous polymorphism in exon 5 of the TGIF gene, showed a nonsignificant trend towards association to psychosis (P-value=0.077). TGIF is involved in neurodevelopment, neuron survival and controls the expression of dopamine receptors. Altogether, our results point to the possible involvement of TGIF in the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders in the CVCR population.
    Molecular Psychiatry 12/2007; 12(11):1033-41. · 15.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Schizophrenia is a complex psychiatric disorder, likely to be caused in part by multiple genes. In this study, linkage analyses were performed to identify chromosomal regions most likely to be associated with schizophrenia and psychosis in multiplex families of Mexican and Central American origin. Four hundred and fifty-nine individuals from 99 families, containing at least two siblings with hospital diagnoses of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, were genotyped. Four hundred and four microsatellite markers were genotyped for all individuals and multipoint non-parametric linkage analyses were performed using broad (any psychosis) and narrow (schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder) models. Under the broad model, three chromosomal regions (1pter-p36, 5q35, and 18p11) exhibited evidence of linkage with non-parametric lod (NPL) scores greater than 2.7 (equivalent to empirical P values of less than 0.001) with the peak multipoint NPL = 3.42 (empirical P value = 0.00003), meeting genomewide evidence for significant linkage in the 1pter-p36 region. Under the narrow model, the same three loci showed (non-significant) evidence of linkage. These linkage findings (1pter-p36, 18p11, and 5q35) highlight where genes for psychosis and schizophrenia are most likely to be found in persons of Mexican and Central American ancestry, and correspond to recent linkages of schizophrenia or psychosis in other populations which were formed in part from emigrants from the Spanish empire of the 15th and 16th centuries.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Neuropsychiatric Genetics 04/2007; 144B(2):193-9. · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have identified a putative gene locus for both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in the chromosome 18q21 region. To identify candidate genes associated with these disorders we completed fine mapping analyses (using microsatellite markers) in 152 families from the Central Valley of Costa Rica (CVCR) (376 total subjects, 151 with a history of psychosis, 97 with a history of mania). Microsatellite analyses showed evidence of association at two contiguous markers, both located at the same genetic distance and spanning approximately 11 known genes. In a corollary gene expression study, one of these genes, malic enzyme 2 (ME2), showed levels of gene expression 5.6-fold lower in anterior cingulate tissue from post-mortem bipolar brains. Subsequent analysis of individual SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium with the ME2 gene revealed one SNP and one haplotype associated with the phenotype of psychosis in the CVCR sample. ME2 interacts directly with the malate shuttle system, which has been shown to be altered in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and has roles in neuronal synthesis of glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid. The present study suggests that genetic variation in or near the ME2 gene is associated with both psychotic and manic disorders, including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.
    Psychiatry Research 03/2007; 150(1):1-11. · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Linkage studies using multiplex families have repeatedly implicated chromosome 8 as involved in schizophrenia etiology. The reported areas of linkage, however, span a wide chromosomal region. The present study used the founder population of the Central Valley of Costa Rica and phenotyping strategies alternative to DSM-IV classifications in attempts to further delimitate the areas on chromosome 8 that may harbor schizophrenia susceptibility genes. A linkage disequilibrium screen of chromosome 8 was performed using family trios of individuals with a history of psychosis. Four discrete regions showing evidence of association (nominal P values less than 0.05) to the phenotype of schizophrenia were identified: 8p23.1, 8p21.3, 8q13.3 and 8q24.3. The region of 8p23.1 precisely overlaps a region showing strong evidence of linkage disequilibrium for severe bipolar disorder in Costa Rica. The same chromosomal regions were identified when the broader phenotype definition of all individuals with functional psychosis was used for analyses. Stratification of the psychotic sample by history of mania suggests that the 8q13.3 locus may be preferentially associated with non-manic psychosis. These results may be helpful in targeting specific areas to be analyzed in association-based or linkage disequilibrium-based studies, for researchers who have found evidence of linkage to schizophrenia on chromosome 8 within their previous studies.
    Psychiatric Genetics 09/2006; 16(4):159-68. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study used the population of the Central Valley of Costa Rica (CVCR) and phenotyping strategies alternative to DSMIV classifications to investigate the association of neuregulin 1 with schizophrenia. Using 134 family trios with a history of psychosis, we genotyped six of the seven markers originally identified to be associated with schizophrenia in Iceland. The neuregulin Icelandic haplotype was not associated with schizophrenia in the CVCR population. However, a novel haplotype was found to be overrepresented in subjects with functional psychosis (global P-value > 0.05). Stratification of the sample by history of mania suggests that this haplotype may be preferentially over-transmitted to persons with a history of manic psychosis. These results suggest that the neuregulin 1 gene is unlikely to play a major role in predisposing to schizophrenia in the CVCR. Further studies in the CVCR and other Latin American populations should be performed in order to corroborate these findings.
    Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 04/2006; 113(4):314-21. · 4.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The long-standing concept that schizophrenia (SC) and bipolar disorder (BP) represent two distinct illnesses has been recently challenged by findings of overlap of genetic susceptibility loci for these two diseases. We report here the results of a linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis of chromosome 18 utilizing subjects with SC from the Central Valley of Costa Rica. Evidence of association (P < 0.05) was obtained in three chromosomal regions: 18p11.31 (D18S63), 18q12.3 (D18S474), and 18q22.3-qter (D18S1161, D18S70), all of which overlap or are in close proximity with loci previously shown to be in LD with BP, type I in this population. Since both the SC and bipolar samples contained cases with a history of mania and almost all cases of SC and BP had a history of psychosis, we performed an alternative phenotyping strategy to determine whether presence or absence of mania, in the context of psychosis, would yield distinct linkage patterns along chromosome 18. To address this issue, a cohort of psychotic patients (including a range of DSMIV diagnoses) was divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of mania. Regions that showed association with SC showed segregation of association when the sample was stratified by history of mania. Our results are compared with previous genetic studies of susceptibility to SC or BP, in Costa Rica as well as in other populations. This study illustrates the importance of detailed phenotype analysis in the search for susceptibility genes influencing complex psychiatric disorders in isolated populations and suggests that subdivision of psychoses by presence or absence of past mania syndromes may be useful to define genetic subtypes of chronic psychotic illness.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Neuropsychiatric Genetics 12/2005; 139B(1):54-60. · 3.23 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

205 Citations
71.74 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2010
    • Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
      • • Paul L. Foster School of Medicine
      • • Department of Psychiatry
      Lubbock, TX, United States
    • University of Costa Rica
      • Centro de Investigación en Biología Celular y Molecular (CIBCM)
      San José, Provincia de San Jose, Costa Rica
  • 2006–2008
    • University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
      • Department of Psychiatry
      San Antonio, TX, United States