Meritxell Rosell

Imperial College London, Londinium, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (11)51.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: RIP140 is a transcriptional coregulator involved in energy homeostasis, ovulation and mammary gland development. Although conclusive evidence is lacking, reports have implicated a role for RIP140 in breast cancer. Here, we explored the mechanistic role of RIP140 in breast cancer and its involvement in Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Using ChIP-seq analysis, we demonstrate that RIP140 shares over 80% of its binding sites with ERα, colocalizing with its interaction partners FOXA1, GATA3, p300, CBP and p160 family members at H3K4me1-demarcated enhancer regions. RIP140 is required for ERα-complex formation, ERα-mediated gene expression and ERα-dependent breast cancer cell proliferation. Genes affected following RIP140 silencing could be used stratify tamoxifen-treated breast cancer cohorts, based on clinical outcome. Importantly, this gene signature was only effective in endocrine treated conditions. Cumulatively, our data suggests that RIP140 plays an important role in ERα-mediated transcriptional regulation in breast cancer and response to tamoxifen treatment.
    Cancer research. 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Brown adipocytes dissipate energy whereas white adipocytes are an energy storage site. We explored the plasticity of different white adipose tissue depots in acquiring a brown phenotype by cold exposure. By comparing cold-induced genes in white fat to those enriched in brown compared to white fat, at thermoneutrality, we defined a "BRITE" transcription signature. We identified the genes, pathways and promoter regulatory motifs associated with "browning" as these represent novel targets for understanding this process. For example, Neuregulin 4 was more highly expressed in brown adipose tissue, upregulated in white fat upon cold exposure and cell studies showed it is a neurite outgrowth-promoting adipokine, indicative of a role in increasing adipose tissue innervation in response to cold. A cell culture system that allows us to reproduce the differential properties of the discrete adipose depots was developed to study depot specific differences at an in vitro level. The key transcriptional events underpinning white adipose tissue to brown transition are important as they represent an attractive proposition to overcome the detrimental effects associated with metabolic disorders including obesity and Type 2 diabetes.
    AJP Endocrinology and Metabolism 02/2014; · 4.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4) is a serum protein involved in the transport of vitamin A. It is known to be produced by the liver and white adipose tissue. RBP4 release by white fat has been proposed to induce insulin resistance. We analyzed the regulation and production of RBP4 in brown adipose tissue. RBP4 gene expression is induced in brown fat from mice exposed to cold or treated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists. In brown adipocytes in culture, norepinephrine, cAMP, and activators of PPARγ and PPARα induced RBP4 gene expression and RBP4 protein release. The induction of RBP4 gene expression by norepinephrine required intact PPAR-dependent pathways, as evidenced by impaired response of the RBP4 gene expression to norepinephrine in PPARα-null brown adipocytes or in the presence of inhibitors of PPARγ and PPARα. PPARγ and norepinephrine can also induce the RBP4 gene in white adipocytes, and overexpression of PPARα confers regulation by this PPAR subtype to white adipocytes. The RBP4 gene promoter transcription is activated by cAMP, PPARα, and PPARγ. This is mediated by a PPAR-responsive element capable of binding PPARα and PPARγ and required also for activation by cAMP. The induction of the RBP4 gene expression by norepinephrine in brown adipocytes is protein synthesis dependent and requires PPARγ-coactivator-1-α, which acts as a norepinephine-induced coactivator of PPAR on the RBP4 gene. We conclude that PPARγ- and PPARα-mediated signaling controls RBP4 gene expression and releases in brown adipose tissue, and thermogenic activation induces RBP4 gene expression in brown fat through mechanisms involving PPARγ-coactivator-1-α coactivation of PPAR signaling.
    Endocrinology 03/2012; 153(3):1162-73. · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) is a distinctive marker of the brown fat phenotype that has been proposed to coordinate the transcriptional activation of genes for lipid oxidation and for thermogenic uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue. Here, we investigated the involvement of PPARα in the transcriptional control of the PPARγ coactivator (PGC)-1α gene. Treatment with PPARα agonists induced PGC-1α mRNA expression in brown fat in vivo and in primary brown adipocytes. This enhancement of PGC-1α transcription was mediated by PPARα binding to a PPAR-responsive element in the distal PGC-1α gene promoter. PGC-1α gene expression was decreased in PPARα-null brown fat, both under basal conditions and in response to thermogenic activation. Moreover, PPARα- and cAMP-mediated pathways interacted to control PGC-1α transcription. PRDM16 (PRD1-BF1-RIZ1 homologous domain-containing 16) promoted PPARα induction of PGC-1α gene transcription, especially under conditions in which protein kinase A pathways were activated. This enhancement was associated with the interaction of PRDM16 with the PGC-1α promoter at the PPARα-binding site. In addition, PPARα promoted the expression of the PRDM16 gene in brown adipocytes, and activation of PPARα in human white adipocytes led to the appearance of a brown adipocyte pattern of gene expression, including induction of PGC-1α and PRDM16. Collectively, these results suggest that PPARα acts as a key component of brown fat thermogenesis by coordinately regulating lipid catabolism and thermogenic gene expression via induction of PGC-1α and PRDM16.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 12/2011; 286(50):43112-22. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα) is a distinctive marker of the brown fat phenotype which has been proposed to coordinate the transcriptional activation of genes for lipid oxidation and for thermogenic uncoupling protein-1 in brown adipose tissue. Here, we investigated the involvement of PPARα in the transcriptional control of the PPARγ-coactivator (PGC)-1α gene. Treatment with PPARα agonists induced PGC-1α mRNA expression in brown fat in vivo and in primary brown adipocytes. This enhancement of PGC-1α transcription was mediated by PPARα binding to a PPAR-responsive element in the distal PGC-1α gene promoter. PGC-1α gene expression was decreased in PPARα-null brown fat, both under basal conditions and in response to thermogenic activation. Moreover, PPARα- and cAMP-mediated pathways interacted to control PGC-1α transcription. PRDM16 (PRD1-BF1-RIZ1 homologous domain-containing 16) promoted PPARα induction of PGC-1α gene transcription, especially under conditions in which protein kinase-A pathways were activated. This enhancement was associated with the interaction of PRDM16 with the PGC-1α promoter at the PPARα-binding site. In addition, PPARα promoted the expression of the PRDM16 gene in brown adipocytes, and activation of PPARα in human white adipocytes led to the appearance of a brown adipocyte pattern of gene expression, including induction of PGC-1α and PRDM16. Collectively, these results suggest that PPARα acts as a key component of brown fat thermogenesis by coordinately regulating lipid catabolism and thermogenic gene expression via induction of PGC-1α and PRDM16.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 10/2011; · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    Meritxell Rosell, Marius C Jones, Malcolm G Parker
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity and its associated complications, which can lead to the development of metabolic syndrome, are a worldwide major public health concern especially in developed countries where they have a very high prevalence. RIP140 is a nuclear coregulator with a pivotal role in controlling lipid and glucose metabolism. Genetically manipulated mice devoid of RIP140 are lean with increased oxygen consumption and are resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity and hepatic steatosis with improved insulin sensitivity. Moreover, white adipocytes with targeted disruption of RIP140 express genes characteristic of brown fat including CIDEA and UCP1 while skeletal muscles show a shift in fibre type composition enriched in more oxidative fibres. Thus, RIP140 is a potential therapeutic target in metabolic disorders. In this article we will review the role of RIP140 in tissues relevant to the appearance and progression of the metabolic syndrome and discuss how the manipulation of RIP140 levels or activity might represent a therapeutic approach to combat obesity and associated metabolic disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translating nuclear receptors from health to disease.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 12/2010; 1812(8):919-28. · 4.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Plasma FGF21 levels and hepatic FGF21 gene expression increase dramatically after birth in mice. This induction is initiated by suckling, requires lipid intake, is impaired in PPARalpha null neonates, and is mimicked by treatment with the PPARalpha activator, Wy14,643. Neonates exhibit reduced FGF21 expression in response to fasting, in contrast to the upregulation occurring in adults. Changes in FGF21 expression due to suckling or nutritional manipulations were associated with circulating free fatty acid and ketone body levels. We mimicked the FGF21 postnatal rise by injecting FGF21 into fasting neonates, and found that this enhanced the expression of genes involved in thermogenesis within brown fat, and increased body temperature. Brown adipocytes treated with FGF21 exhibited increased expression of thermogenic genes, higher total and uncoupled respiration, and enhanced glucose oxidation. We propose that the induction of FGF21 production by the liver mediates direct activation of brown fat thermogenesis during the fetal-to-neonatal transition.
    Cell metabolism 03/2010; 11(3):206-12. · 17.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The nuclear receptor cofactor receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) is essential for cumulus cell-oocyte complex (COC) expansion, follicular rupture, and oocyte release during ovulation. The expression of many genes necessary for COC expansion is impaired in the absence of RIP140, but the studies herein document that their expression can be restored and COC expansion rescued by treatment with the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like factor amphiregulin (AREG) both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate by several approaches that RIP140 is required for the expression of the EGF-like factors in granulosa cells, but the dependence of genes involved in cumulus expansion, including Ptgs2 Has2, Tnfaip6, and Ptx3, is indirect because they are induced by AREG. Treatment of granulosa cells with forskolin to mimic the effects of LH increases AREG promoter activity in a RIP140-dependent manner that 1) requires an intact cAMP response element in the proximal promoter region of the Areg gene and 2) involves its actions as a coactivator for cAMP response element-binding protein/c-Jun transcription factors. Although human chorionic gonadotropin and AREG coadministration is sufficient to restore ovulation fully in RIP140 heterozygous mice in vivo, both follicular rupture and ovulation remain impaired in the RIP140 null mice. Thus, we conclude that although the level of RIP140 expression in the ovary is a crucial factor required for the transient expression of EGF-like factors necessary for cumulus expansion, it also plays a role in other signaling pathways that induce follicular rupture.
    Endocrinology 03/2010; 151(6):2923-32. · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genetic modification approaches or pharmacological interventions may be useful for understanding the molecular mechanisms by which nutrient derivatives and metabolites exert their effects in the perinatal period and how they may influence longterm metabolism in adults. Examples for such experimental settings in rodents are targeted disruption of the gene for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-a, a lipid sensor and master regulator of lipid catabolism, or maternal treatment with agonists of PPARgamma, a master regulator of adipogenesis and target of insulin sensitizing drugs in adults. All these interventions show differential effects in the perinatal period compared to adults and indicate that altered activity of master regulators of metabolism results in profound metabolic alterations in the perinatal period that may influence adult metabolism.
    Advances in experimental medicine and biology 02/2009; 646:141-8. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Uncoupling protein-3 (UCP3) is a member of the mitochondrial carrier family expressed preferentially in skeletal muscle and heart. It appears to be involved in metabolic handling of fatty acids in a way that minimizes excessive production of reactive oxygen species. Fatty acids are powerful regulators of UCP3 gene transcription. We have found that the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) on the control of UCP3 gene expression depends on the tissue and developmental stage. In adults, UCP3 mRNA expression is unaltered in skeletal muscle from PPARalpha-null mice both in basal conditions and under the stimulus of starvation. In contrast, UCP3 mRNA is down-regulated in adult heart both in fed and fasted PPARalpha-null mice. This occurs despite the increased levels of free fatty acids caused by fasting in PPARalpha-null mice. In neonates, PPARalpha-null mice show impaired UCP3 mRNA expression in skeletal muscle in response to milk intake, and this is not a result of reduced free fatty acid levels. The murine UCP3 promoter is activated by fatty acids through either PPARalpha or PPARdelta but not by PPARgamma or retinoid X receptor alone. PPARdelta-dependent activation could be a potential compensatory mechanism to ensure appropriate expression of UCP3 gene in adult skeletal muscle in the absence of PPARalpha. However, among transcripts from other PPARalpha and PPARdelta target genes, only those acutely induced by milk intake in wild-type neonates were altered in muscle or heart from PPARalpha-null neonates. Thus, PPARalpha-dependent regulation is required for appropriate gene regulation of UCP3 as part of the subset of fatty-acid-responsive genes in neonatal muscle and heart.
    Endocrinology 11/2006; 147(10):4695-704. · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    01/2006;

Publication Stats

158 Citations
51.81 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Imperial College London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2006–2012
    • University of Barcelona
      • Departament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular (Biologia)
      Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
    • National Cancer Institute (USA)
      • Laboratory of Metabolism
      Maryland, United States