A Davidoff

University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States

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Publications (16)27.87 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Transabdominal sonograms of 68 consecutive pregnant women were reviewed retrospectively. Images of fetal parts obtained through the umbilical window (UW) were compared with those obtained through the paraumbilical window (PUW) as to (1) thickness of tissue to amniotic cavity, (2) clarity of the part imaged, and (3) noise produced. The paraumbilical tissue thickness had a mean of 18 mm; the umbilical tissue thickness, a mean of 11 mm. In patients where the difference in thickness of their paraumbilical tissue and umbilical tissue was only 0 mm to 6 mm (group 1), the UW improved clarity in 10 of 34 (29%), reduced clarity in 3 of 34 (9%), and did not change clarity in 21 of 34 (62%). Improvement of images with use of the UW was not statistically significant. However, in the group of patients with the difference in tissue thickness between the paraumbilical and umbilical areas of > 6 mm (group 2), clarity was improved in 19 of 32 (60%), reduced in 2 of 32 (6%), and was unaltered in 11 of 32 (34%). In this group the image improvement with the UW was statistically significant. Images through the UW had relatively less noise. In group 1, noise was reduced in 12 of 35 (34%). The effect of the UW on noise reduction was more significant in group 2 (tissue thickness difference > 6 mm): 24 of 31 (77%) of cases.
    Journal of Clinical Ultrasound 05/1994; 22(4):263-7. · 0.70 Impact Factor
  • Investigative Radiology - INVEST RADIOL. 01/1993; 28(12).
  • Investigative Radiology - INVEST RADIOL. 01/1993; 28(12).
  • Investigative Radiology - INVEST RADIOL. 01/1993; 28(12).
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    ABSTRACT: Dynamic chest computed tomography (CT) was performed in 326 patients who had undergone abdominal CT for blunt trauma to evaluate the role of chest CT in screening for thoracic aortic injury. Evidence of mediastinal bleeding constituted an abnormal CT examination. The results were correlated with those from aortography in 131 patients. The chest radiographs were abnormal in 127 patients (39%). Of those 127 patients, chest CT scans were abnormal in 39 patients; an aortic tear was present in eight of those patients (21%). The remaining 88 patients had normal CT scans and no aortic injury. Of the 199 patients with normal radiographs, 15 had abnormal CT scans and 184 had normal CT scans and no aortic injury. There were no false-negative CT scans; 79% of patients with normal CT scans had false-positive chest radiographs. With CT there was a significant improvement over plain radiography in specificity, accuracy, and predictive value of positive results. If chest CT were used as an adjunct to chest radiography in the screening for traumatic aortic tear, the need for aortography would decrease by 56%. Chest CT can safely help discriminate candidates for aortography, is cost-effective, and, in hemodynamically stable patients, should be incorporated in the screening for traumatic aortic tear.
    Radiology 04/1992; 182(3):667-73. · 6.34 Impact Factor
  • Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise - MED SCI SPORT EXERCISE. 01/1992; 24.
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    ABSTRACT: We present a case report of a urethral diverticulum where magnetic resonance imaging suggested infected contents of the urethral diverticulum besides providing superb detail of periurethral anatomy. The critical clinical question was answered.
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging 02/1991; 9(6):955-7. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The usefulness of non-contrast CT, limited to the upper abdomen, in conjunction with conventional IV contrast-enhanced scanning was studied prospectively in 190 patients who had sustained blunt abdominal trauma. In 78, visceral injuries were confirmed at surgery or at follow-up CT. Of the patients with injuries, 14 (18%) had hyperdense hematomas on the non-contrast studies that became isodense after IV administration of contrast material. These hematomas generally were small and posed an immediate threat to life in only one patient (0.5% of all subjects). In 13% of patients with injury (5% of the total), the additional information did influence treatment planning (surgery in two and intensive conservative treatment in eight). Compared with conventional contrast scanning, the combined non-contrast-contrast technique increased the scanning time only by about 5 1/2 min, but it improved the sensitivity and accuracy of CT in detecting visceral injuries from 74% and 84% to 92% and 91%, respectively (p less than or equal to .003 and p less than or equal to .04). Although contrast-enhanced scanning alone accurately depicts visceral injuries requiring surgical treatment, the incorporation of a non-contrast sequence can detect a subgroup of patients who require intensive conservative management with bed rest and close observation. This additional information can be obtained expeditiously, with minimal additional effort or intervention. The use of non-contrast scanning alone is not recommended.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 02/1989; 152(1):41-8. · 2.90 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Clinical Ultrasound 01/1989; 17(3):219-21. · 0.70 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Roentgenology 11/1988; 151(4):834-5. · 2.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We reviewed the charts of 87 patients with documented splenic injuries resulting from blunt trauma admitted to a regional trauma referral center during the 32-month period beginning in January 1984. Delayed celiotomy was defined as surgical intervention for splenic injury after a trail of nonoperative management lasting at least 24 hours. Delayed celiotomy was not required in any of the 16 cases in the pediatric age group (age less than or equal to 17 years) who were initially managed nonoperatively. In contrast, of the 27 adults who were initially treated nonoperatively, ten (37%) ultimately required celiotomy. Although splenorrhaphy was successfully performed in 21 of 44 patients undergoing early operation, all ten of the patients requiring celiotomy after an unsuccessful trial of observation underwent splenectomy rather than a spleen-preserving procedure. Of the 27 adults who were initially managed nonoperatively, 24 had abdominal computed tomography (CT) performed during their initial diagnostic evaluation. Twenty-three of these scans were reviewed by one of the authors. A CT scoring system was developed, based on the degree of splenic parenchymal and capsular injury and the amount of fluid in the abdomen and the pelvis. Adult patients who were successfully treated without operation had a significantly (p = 0.011) lower total CT score than did patients who required delayed celiotomy. No adult with a total CT score less than 2.5 required delayed operative intervention. These data support
    The Journal of trauma 07/1988; 28(6):828-31. · 2.35 Impact Factor
  • K L Reuter, A Davidoff, T Hunter
    Journal of Clinical Ultrasound 07/1988; 16(5):346-8. · 0.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Visualization of the head of the pancreas by CT was prospectively evaluated in two groups of 100 patients who did not have pancreatic disease. Patients were given either a fat-density oral contrast material (12.5% corn-oil emulsion and metoclopramide) or a conventional high-density oral contrast material (barium suspension or iodinated solution). There was no statistically significant difference in the subjects' tolerance to the two regimens. There was, however, a significant improvement in ability to distinguish the head of the pancreas from the duodenal C-loop when the fat-density contrast material was given. When pancreaticoduodenal discrimination was graded, patients given corn-oil emulsion and metoclopramide received an average score of 0.94, whereas those given the high-density agent received an average score of 0.74, with 1.00 being the highest possible score (p less than .005). These data suggest that for routine CT evaluation of the head of the pancreas, a combination of corn-oil emulsion and metoclopramide may be superior to the conventional high-density oral contrast agents given without metoclopramide.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 07/1988; 150(6):1303-6. · 2.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To overcome the problem of inadequate mixing of gastrointestinal (GI) tract contents with conventional high-density oral contrast agents in abdominal computed tomography (CT), a flavored 12.5% corn oil emulsion (COE) was tested as an oral contrast agent in 62 patients. The results were compared with those obtained from 105 patients who received high-density oral contrast agents. A simple patient preparation regimen for the COE was developed, which appears to be reasonably well tolerated by the patients and yields diagnostic studies comparable to those obtained with conventional agents. Use of the COE resulted in consistent discrimination of the GI tract and depiction of the GI wall. Preliminary data suggest that it may be particularly useful for CT evaluation of the stomach, duodenum, and pancreas; in patients suspected of having solid tumors; and in thin people.
    Radiology 10/1987; 164(3):653-6. · 6.34 Impact Factor
  • J. Kelly, V. Raptopoulos, A. Davidoff
    Investigative Radiology - INVEST RADIOL. 01/1987; 22(9).
  • Investigative Radiology - INVEST RADIOL. 01/1987; 22(9).